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Full text of "Public documents of the legislature of Connecticut, ... session .."

university of 

Connecticut 

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DOES NOT CIRCULATE 



T 

PUBLIC DOCUMENTS 

A3 

of THE Vi I 

i 
STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



.JANUARY SESSION. 16 



printed by (Drder of the (6etterat ^st^embly 



HARTFORD : 
131 



CONTENTS 



1 . Governor's Message. 

REPORTS. 

Treasurer. 

Comptroller of Public Accounts. 

4. Criminal Business of Courts. 

5. School Fund Commissioner. 
Connecticut Hospital for the Insane. 

7. State Reform School. 

8. Industrial School for Girls. 

9. State Prison. 

1">. Abstract of Returns concerning Jails. 

1 1. Adjutant-General. 

: _ State Board of Health. 

1".. Bank Commissioners. 

14. Railroad Commissioners. 

15. 1' Mi Commissioners. 

16. Shell-Fish Commissione 

IT. Capitol Grounds, Commissioners for Grading 

1 v Sheffield Scientific School. 

19. Agricultural Experiment Station. 

20. Pharmacy < loinmiss 
-\ Board of Charil 

Liquors, Commission to 
1 1 era! 



MESSAGE 






Ills EXCELLENT ^ 



HOBART B. BlGELOW, 



60YERN0R OF CON.M.nh 1 1. 



in III I 



General Assembly, 



-A/// iu i t'ij / , l&S y. 



Printed by Otiet of ilic Le^i>l;iturc. 



HARTFORD, CONN 

Tin ( 'AM . LO KWOOD vV I'.uain LBD Oo., P 
1882. 



< 



M ESS AG !•:. 



To th § and Hous< of li >>>■. g< ntati 

The anuual review of the condition and history of our 
State, which it is my duty to present to you at your assem- 
bling contains nothing which marks the past year as excep- 
tional. We have continued in the way of peace and general 
prosperity on which the year opened. We have not been 
disturbed by sedition at home, nor alarmed by threatenings 
from abroad. Our harvests have been gathered, our trade 
has ha<l its healthy and Legitimate growth, our manufactures 
have been in steady and remunerative operation. The «l 
trous attack apontlie late President Garfield has saddened us 
in common with our brethren of the whole nation: we have 
mourned him sincerely: we have been horror-stricken al the 
crime that deprived the nation of its great chief magistrate. 
lint we have seen the disaster tall upon us without causing 
any crisis m the conduct of the general government. We 
have drawn from this Pact -till greater confidence in ■ free 

BJ Stem : and we have seen our common sorrow lead to feelings 

■ union and brotherhood throughout all sections 

our land. We are in an era of hope, of good feeling, and of 

sperity. It is, then, without the expectation of presenting 
any matter of new or special interest or importance that 1 ask 
your attention to a statement of tin* affairs of our common- 
wealth. 

The State Finances. 
The total receipts of the treasury for th.- year ending 
\ ember 80th have h<-< > n II J 224 60.01, and , '"' expenditures 
have i"'«'ii H This 

business of 1 Last year the receipt H . ,;,; l.- 

>ut the balance on th.- war's Lu> 



440.87. We have, then, during the year increased the revenue 
and decreased the expenses. The total balance carried over 
this year to the new account is 11,118,892.55. ■ I called your 
attention last year to the fact that this amount was usually 
needed early in the year to meet current demands. There 
stand also to be paid therefrom unexpended appropriations to 
the sum of 1121,000. This amount is still due on appropria- 
tions made by the last General Assembly. I must refer you to 
the detailed report of the comptroller for the manner in which 
this money has been expended. It will be seen that the differ- 
ences which may appear between the figures of this year and 
the year preceding are all to be found in the sums spent by 
the State in its charitable and benevolent institutions. In 
the expenses which have been incurred in the maintenance of 
peace and order, the protection of business and of life, the 
education of our children, and the administration of justice, 
in what can be strictly called the government of the State, 
there has been no material change. 

The State Debt. 

The statement of the condition of the public debt remains 
the same as in 1881. 1 will repeat it in order again to call 
the attention of the General Assembly to the fact that it has 
not been decreased, and that no provision has been made by 
law for its gradual extinction. The amount of bonds outstand- 
ing is 14,967,600. Of this the sum of 1877,000 becomes due 
at the end of the current year. 

It is the opinion of the Treasurer that this amount can be 
paid from the balance which it is estimated will be in his 
hands at that time. If it should result that in the course of 
the following year the treasury is embarrassed by so large a 
payment, the difficulty will probably not be so great but that a 
temporary and small loan will supply all necessities till the 
gap lias been filled by the natural increase in the revenue. 
But this management supposes the maintenance of the pres- 
ent rate of taxation and no material increase in the expend- 
itures of the State. 

It is my sad duty to announce to you the recent death, on 
the second of January, of the State Treasurer, the Hon. David 



P, Niclmis A hum- and faithful career in the service oi the 
State has thus been closed. Mr. Nichols had been four I 
chosen to till the important office of Treasurer, and had per- 
formed its duties with thorough knowledge and capacity, with 
eminent modesty and dignity, and with an uprightness that is 
beyond praise. His death in the active discharge of bis office 
must be looked upon as a public misfortune, and his Loss as a 
serious one to the state. I > \ kis character he had deserved 
the confidence of his fellow citizens, and by his faithful ser- 
he has earned their gratitude and remembrance. 
The demands of public business being Buch that the office 
of Treasurer could no1 remain vacant without serious dis- 
turbance and inconvenience, 1 have, after consultation with 
and advice from the full bench of judges of the Supreme 
Court of Errors, exercised the powers vested in the Governor 
by statute, and have filled the vacancy by the appointment of 
James D. Smith, of Stamford, to be Treasurer for the unex- 
pired term. 

Banks. 

From the report of the Bank Commissioners you will learn 
that the State hanks are. on the whole, in a healthy and pros- 
pering condition. There is no change in their number. 
There are enough of them to meet the demands of business, 
and they are guarded by such Limitations and restrictions that 
organization of new ones offers no temptation to the specu- 
lator. An examination of the figures of the commission 
report shows an increase in small depositors and in the gross 

sum of deposits: it also exhibits a change in the character 
of investments. The amount of loans on real estate is dec 
ing, while the loans made upon the restricted classes of per- 
sonal property allowed by the law are increasing. The 
possession of this class of property enables the hanks more 

ly to meet any sudden demand for money. Then 
nothing in this department of State interests which calls for 
special remark. The commissioners make no recommenda- 
tions tor new Legislation, and you will probably he called 
upon to do only the routine business "t every year in this 
direction. 



6 

The National Guard. 

The active militia of the State consists of four regiments 
and one battalion of infantry and one battery of artillery. 
These form a brigade, under command of a Brigadier-Gen- 
eral. There are thirty-seven infantry companies, divided 
into one regiment of ten companies, three of eight companies, 
and one battalion of three companies. By the muster of 
November, 1881, we have 2,334 men in service, of whom 165 
are commissioned officers and 2,169 enlisted men. This is a 
decrease from last year of 580. Seven companies of infantry 
have been disbanded, four in accordance with the act of 1881, 
and three because they failed to reach a proper standard of 
efficiency. Active service during the year has embraced the 
customary parades, and an encampment at Nianticfor six days 
of the second, third, and fourth regiments, and the artillery. 
The first regiment was chosen to represent the State at the 
Yorktown Centennial Celebration, in accordance with the 
special act of the last General Assembly. The second com- 
pany of Governor's foot guards were detailed for escort duty, 
under the provisions of the same act. These organizations 
took part in the ceremonies at Yorktown on the 20th of 
October. 

As directed by the last Assembly, I was present with my 
staff. The militia of Connecticut, though they had to con- 
tend with the disadvantages and annoyances of delays, pre- 
sented a most creditable appearance. They did not suffer 
from comparison with any body of troops in the great line of the 
general review. In soldierly appearance, perfection of equip- 
ment, and precision of movement they were not surpassed. 
The same qualities, with a very high degree of discipline, were 
exhibited throughout the entire trip. Their visit to Charles- 
ton, by invitation of the city and State authorities, was, in 
many respects, a memorable event. It was memorable as 
being, as nearly as such a thing is possible, the visit of one 
State to another ; it was memorable from the representative 
character, in their respective sections, of the States that took 
part in it, and it was especially memorable to Connecticut 
from the liberal, whole-souled, and sincere welcome with which 



{ 



her representatives were received. Nothing was lefl undone 
to make the occasion pleasant in every particular. I believe 
that tin- visit gave a Large body of Connecticut citizens new 
and truer ideas of the South, its Peelings and motives \\'« 
hope thai those southern citizens whom we met, and to whom 
ire indebted for such s fraternal welcome, vr -• • i 1 1 < * « 1 from 
the visit truer conceptions of the temper of our people toward 
them. It has certainly given an added cordiality and hearti- 
a to the good feeling between Connecticut and South 
Carolina. 

1 cannot refrain from giving a word of well-merited praise 
to the behavior of the troops on their tedious sea voyi 
under the strange discomforts of an ill-provided troop-ship, 
and to the excellent interior discipline and admirable Belf- 
control exhibited amid the festivities of the two days and 
nights entertainment at Charleston. It is do small praise to 
say that in a body of five hundred soldiers, enjoyingthe most 
open-handed and unlimited entertainment at the hands of 
the local militia, nothing occurred to occasion even the repri- 
mand of a superior officer. 

Coast Defences. 
We may he assured that we have a force sufficient lor the 
ty of the State, so far as it may he threatened with inte- 
rior violence. As much cannot he said of those defences for 
which we depend upon the general government. I call your 
attention to the fact that the great thoroughfare for commerce 
which forms our BOUthern boundary, Long Island Sound, is 
practically without defence. No work that in these daye 
advances in the art of war deserves the name of fortification 
Lies between the ocean and our Connecticut sea-ports. How- 
ever good may he our local militia, we are ;it the mercy of 
the firsl attack from the sea. It may be well for you to take 
such action as will direct the attention of the Federal G 
eminent to the neglected condition of our coast. 

Common Schools. 
Our common-school system is so matured, so long estab- 
lished, and so well settled in its methods and results, that the 



8 

annual review made from year to year shows but little change. 
In the number of schools, of children, of days of attendance, 
etc., there is observable the increase to be expected from the 
natural growth of our population. This, of course, occasions 
a slight steady increase of expenditure which is met by the 
natural increase of the revenue. It is only when comparison 
is made between periods separated by some considerable lapse 
of time, that the real growth of our schools can be fairly esti- 
mated. During the past year they have undergone no change 
in management. They are doing their important and benefi- 
cent work quietly and thoroughly. It is probable that only 
matters of detail will be brought to your attention. 

Storrs' Agricultural School and Experiment Station. 
The report of the directors of the Agricultural Experiment 
station shows that the work of the past year has been mostly 
directed to the examination of commercial fertilizers, fodder, 
and feed stuffs produced in this State or used here, and the 
examination of milk and dairy products. Thus far the sta- 
tion has had the use of rooms rent free. In 1877, when the 
station was established by the act of the Legislature, the 
Sheffield Scientific School of Yale College tendered the free 
use, for five years, of certain rooms ready fitted for the work. 
This, witli the other facilities coming with it, enabled the 
station to begin its work at once. The five years end June, 
1882, and the growth of the Scientific School in this period 
has been such that now it needs these rooms, and has so 
notified the Board of Control of the Experiment Station. 
This makes it necessary to provide new accommodations, and 
this Assembly will be asked to give this branch of the State 
service the means to carry on its work independently and 
efficiently. It is a matter for State pride that its lead in the 
establishment of this service has been followed by so many 
other States. They have recognized the wisdom of our action, 
and have created institutions for the same ends. Most of 
these are on a larger scale, some on a very much larger scale 
than ours, the evidence being that the true interests of the 
respective States justify their liberality. 



The Storra Agricultural School, authorized by the last 
General Assembly, was opened od the 28th of Septem 
and is now fully organized ami under operation, with three 
instructors and thirteen Bcholars. The managemen( and in- 
struction is, I believe, in the hands of men who will Bpare no 
pains to make it thoroughly practical and efficient. The 
scholars have engaged with spirit in the work of the faro 

well as in the duties of the class-r q. The trustees look 

upon the beginnings of this school as full of promise for the 
future oi our agriculture. Being the first of its kind in this 
country, and having no example to follow, it must roach 8UC- 

3 through experience. It is intended to be more technical 
and nearer the farm than the Agricultural College has been 
or well can he. It is intended to strengthen in its pupils 
their attachment for rural life. Its object is not to make 
scholars, hut to train young men to he well informed and 
skillful farmers. The school in its early must of 

necessity he an experiment. It is cordially commended to the 
ring care of the General Assembly. With your support 
it cannot fail to win success and prove honorable ami profit- 
able to the State. 

State Prison. 

The report of the commissioners of t lie State Prison i- in 
some regards a noteworthy one. The high state of discipline 
at this establishment which was reported last year ha-> I 
maintained and increased. The number of punishments has 
decreased, in fact has been Bteadily decreasing under the 
present management. Severe punishments have become of 

the : currence, and even the reprimand is not frequent. 

The appropriations of Last year were no< found quite suffi- 
cient for the work which was found absolutely necessary, 
hut the deficiency was met from the earnings of the 
prison. The deficiency at the close of tip - business 

$5,259.81. This may he traced to three causes; first, the 
number of prisoners has been -mailer than la- by 

eleven; in the next place L,654 days of labor have been 
lost by sickness; thee tanses have tended t«. diminish 

the income of the prison; and in the last pla well 

2 



10 

known that there has been a very appreciable rise during the 
year in the cost of necessaries. This loss by sickness has 
assumed very serious proportions. It is said that about three 
fourths of these cases of disabling sickness can be traced to 
malarial disorders. In view of these facts, and the long 
acknowledged inferior character of the prison buildings, the 
board of commissioners insist this year with particular em- 
phasis, on the necessity of a new prison building on a new 
site. The arguments which they use, and which will doubt- 
less be more fully presented to you, are the age of the prison, 
the fact that it was built in days when prison management 
was radically different from what it is to-day, its manifestly 
unhealthy situation, and the fact that the experience of many 
other states has shown that buildings of the character of our 
old prison are not so built as to allow of the best results un- 
der improved and intelligent management. It may well be 
that the time has come for Connecticut to take into serious 
consideration the whole matter, and show its appreciation of 
the improved conduct of its prison by equipping a proper 
building. 

The Connecticut Prison Association continues its good 
work of aiding discharged prisoners to obtain honest employ- 
ment upon their release from prison. That " no person dis- 
charged from the State prison during the past year can truth- 
fully say that necessity has compelled him to return to crime," 
entitles the Association to the good will of all right minded 
citizens. It is also worthy of remark that the administration 
of the prison has been greatly aided by the co-operation of citi- 
zens who have exerted themselves to make the religious ser- 
vices and life of the prison real and useful. As a consequence 
the effects of the Sunday services have shown themselves in 
the discipline of the week. That this effect is more than 
temporary would appear also from the fact that the number 
of convicts who are returned to the prison to serve out sen- 
tences under a second conviction, is steadily diminishing. 

The State Reform School. 

The matter of most interest in connection with the Reform 
School, is the establishment of an experimental cottage, to 



II 

try the results of the familj system, as compared with the 
congregate system, on which the Bchool has formerly been 
conducted. The buc o far, for a trial <»t aboul nine 

months has been in every way satisfactory. The true 
support the Superintendent in his assertions aboul the work- 
ing of this Bystem, and show thai the action of the lasl 
Lssembly in making the appropriations necessary for the ex- 
periment, was wise. Its immediate extension is not asked 
for, as it is deemed best to have the results of a longer ex- 
perience to support such a recommendation. As a whole the 
State has every reason to be satisfied with the condition of 
the school. The administration of the Superintendent, aided 
by tin- valuable influence of his wife, the matron, has been 
to the satisfaction of the trustees. Their endeavor 1ms been 
to make the school a reformatory and not ;i penal establish- 
ment, and 80 to conduct it that a hoy's having been there will 
furnish a lair presumption that lie will not later become an 
inmate of the State prison. The reverse has been only too 
near the truth in times past. I commend to your favroable 
attention the suggestions which are made by the trustees and 
superintendent, as to what is needed to make the work of the 
school still more efficient. 

The Industrial School for Girls. 
This reformatory, anil a true reformatory it has proved to 
he. has gone on without noteworthy event through the year, 
doing its good and necessary work effectively It has cared 
for -21 girls during the xvwv. of these 174 remain in the 
school, and 47 have been discharged or placed in good 

homes or places where they have I ssl employment. The 

trustees find that there is developing a tendency to Bend to the 
school girls of a very tender age, that they may he kept out of 
the way of vicious and corrupting influences, rather than for 
fane purp erecting evil habits already formed. From 

this and other facts within their knowledge the trustees are 
led to believe, and they represent thai ;i Large number of i 

Lected youth of both Sexes may be found within tli. - 

growing up without responsible guardianshi] 



< 



12 

ditions of ignorance and idleness, and plainly drifting toward 
a life of pauperism and crime. They are to be found in the 
streets of our cities, in the almshouses of our towns, and in 
other places equally ill-fitted for making them good citizens. 
Their case may not need the discipline of the Reform school 
or of the Industrial school, or any management involving ex- 
pense to the State, but it does demand an efficient guardian- 
ship, with power to enforce habits of daily employment in 
school or at work. This subject of neglected children is con- 
sidered of sufficient importance to warrant inquiry into the 
facts and taking such action as their case requires. 

Hospital for Insane. 

At the Middletown hospital for the insane the new build- 
ing, the south hospital, was opened for patients on July 20th, 
the fifteenth anniversary of the establishment. As a conse- 
quence of the enlarged capacity of the retreat there has been 
a notable increase of patients. The year began with 529 
under treatment, and ends with 731. Of these, 719 are aided 
by the State. It is a serious question what provision is to be 
made for our indigent insane. The almshouses of our towns 
are not yet relieved of them, and their number seems to be 
increasing. The State Board of Charities will probably call 
your attention more in detail to this subject. 

The other charitable institutions under the care of the State 
are in a healthy condition according to the reports of their 
boards of trustees, and call for no especial mention. You 
will be given all needed facts in the annual reports which are 
to be submitted to you. 

Commission of Pharmacy. 

The commission of pharmacy in the work of the first year 
under the act. of 1881, have found in general that the act 
meets the requirements of public safety, but some incidental 
defects of detail are referred to in their report, which will 
need your attention. As the law is framed it allows the licens- 
ing of pharmacists residing in the cities and boroughs of the 
State, but when strictly construed would exclude those resid- 



L8 

bag in towns «>r villages. This is apparently an oversight, 
h Bhould be corrected. The Dumber of registered poisons in 
found t'» be too restricted, and I would advise thai Laudanum 
and other dangerous forms of opium be added to tin- List of 
articles, the purchase ofwhich musl be registered. The woi 
the commission is greater than was supposed it would be, and 
consequently, Borne changes of minor consequence will have 
to be made to meet the facts. In general, however, il maj 
id that the law Ikis worked well. 
There is nothing calling for particular discussion here in 
the reports of tin- railroad commissioners or of the State 
board of health or of any of the other State boards. As I 
have already said, in the great pari of the regular admin- 
istration of the >tatc it has been a quiet and uneventful year. 

Reorganisation of Courts. 

It arse impossible for me to say, save in the most 

ral way. what will he the topics on which you will be 

railed to art at this BeS8ion. Most of the changes of OUT laws 

which a sted to a legislature do not show themselves 

at all until presented under the form of a hill or a petition. 
e are, however, a few subjects which have been discussed 
somewhat publicly, either by the press or by associal 
pecially interested in intelligent and effective Legislation, 
whichl think it proper to bring to your notice. One of these 
is the re-organization of the courts of the State. Every one 
familiar with the subjecl admits the defects which exist, 
pecially in our courts of first resort, or original jurisdiction. 
Our system of i having 

.eat part out-lived its useful; - to the 

trial and decision of causes. The changes in our social con- 
dition during tin- last half century has been such that the 
justice courts as now organized do not m< iis< demands 

be people. One thousand jusl two 

id little inquiry i> m i their capacity or fiti 

for the i judicial duties. A great Dumber of minor 

civii e, and are tried by these ms 

(rates. With a Large part of our people all i 



i 



14 

knowledge of justice, and its administration is confined to 
what they have learned from experience in the justice courts. 
It is true that the amounts of money involved are commonly 
small, and can never exceed one hundred dollars, but the 
quality of justice should not be governed by the amount in 
controversy. To one man fifty dollars may be as important 
as five thousand to another, and the rights of both parties 
should be as carefully examined and decided in the one case as 
in the other. It is said that there is a remedy for the miscarriage 
of justice in these justice courts in the opportunity of appeal. 
But this is not always so. Unless the person aggrieved is in 
a position to prosecute an appeal, it is the same to him as if 
no remedy existed. The organization of the higher courts is 
also susceptible to amendment. The State has seen fit to 
change its method of appointing the judges of the higher 
courts, in the hope that the State will have the services of a 
high grade of ability. This is right. The State should call 
the very best brains and the very highest learning to the 
bench, and should make the bench an object of ambition to 
them. \ T ery pertinent to the attainment of this end is the 
proper organization of courts, that justice may be adminis- 
tered with the greatest fairness, the least expense, the most 
certainty, and with as much dispatch as consists with a 
thorough trial. 

A Criminal Code. 

Allied to this topic and of quite equal importance, is the 
matter of the revision, amendment, rearrangement and codi- 
fication of the body of our criminal law. 1 do not think it is 
an error to say that in the opinion of the most of our people 
the efficiency of the administration of our criminal law has, 
within a very few years past, been seriously impaired. Crimes, 
if not criminals, remain unpunished ; the trials of criminal 
cases of capital importance or even of less gravity, if they are 
of a nature to attract public attention, have become a by-word 
for delay, and a reproach for uncertainty, and they are too 
often enacted at full length twice or even three times. Expen- 
ses also are often unjustly distributed, being thrown on small 
towns, when they should be borne by the county or by the 






15 

Is a consequence, the State has Buffered In reputation. 
It is not easy to ii\ the responsibility for this condition of 

things. The fault isnot wholly in the procedure oi ihec Is, 

though it i> partly there ; it is not wholly in the Bystem as at 
present organized, of jury trials, though thai has a shar< 
it: it is not wholly in the substance of our criminal law, 
defining crimes and imposing penalties, though no Bmall part 
of it lies there, but it affects the whole body. The acts now 
grouped under the title of "Crimes and Criminal Prosecu- 
tions" have been enacted at various times and often without 
much regard to each other, and there seems to 1"- a need for 
a more accurate definition of crimes and readjustment of 
penalties. Can there be any doubt that the crime of burglary, 
for instance, Bhould be divided into d and punishments 

provided proportionate to the magnitude of the offense? The 
breaking into an inhabited dwelling-house in the night ti 
armed with a dangerous weapon, is in its nature a higher 
grade of offense, and Bhould be more Beverely punished, than 
the breaking and entering <»t" an uninhabited dwelling in the 
night time by an unarmed person. 
It is important that the criminal law Bhould be expressed 
- plain and accurate a form as possible. It Bhould b 
forth that any man can know with certainty for what 
lie may become liable to criminal punishment. When off 
have been committed punishment should he Bure. The 
tainty of punishment i> a much more powerful deterrent from 
crime than its Beverity 'Hie criminal cl ipon 

their chano - ping the penalty of their crimes, and the 

odds should be made very heavy against them. In our State 

the cut. -re. -in, nt .-i criminal law i> to extent com- 
mitted to men who are not trained Lawyers. Their work 
would he more efficiently dour if the whole of the criminal 
law was contained in a carefully prepared code. The 

»n of such a code would not be an experiment, and pre- 

ts no difficulties beyond finding competent and willing 

persons to do the work. The appointment of commissions 

h of th<- Subjects I have \. 

would meet my hearty approval. During tip- last (i 



i 



16 

Connecticut has made some important changes in her law to 
adapt it to the demands of our present society. The results 
have been highly beneficial. That they are so is due in large 
measure to the fact that the statutes by which the changes 
were effected have been drafted by able and experienced men 
after careful study. I can especially name in this connection 
the late Judge Seymour, who during the last part of his 
life devoted a large part of his time to this important service. 
If it is thought best to appoint such a commission to enter 
upon the work of codifying our criminal law it should be 
provided that they report their progress to future assemblies, 
and that they submit their work to the examination, criticism, 
and suggestions of the bench of judges, before it is reported 
to the legislature for final enactment. 

Attorney-General. 
Our State has no recognized legal adviser, or law officer. 
It has been the custom for the various departments of the 
government, when questions of law regarding their duties have 
arisen, to consult counsel as it pleased them, or to proceed 
according to custom and their own judgment. In the making 
of contracts and other work of a legal nature, the interests of 
the State have been protected, if at all, by occasional counsel. 
The executive has had no one whose duty it was to overlook 
these matters and to examine the questions presented. It 
has happened from this state of things that the legal rights 
of the State have in some instances failed of proper protection 
and the State government has suffered pecuniary loss in con- 
siderable sums. Our practice is quite the contrary of that of 
other States in the Union. In more than thirty of them some 
trained law officer of the State is found, to whom are officially 
referred the thousand and one questions that are arising from 
day to day in the conduct of public business. I strongly urge 
upon your favorable consideration the proposal which will 
probably be made to you at this session, to create and make 
provision for filling the office of Attorney-General. I com- 
mend this action to you as being in the interests of true 
economy. 



17 

Conclusion. 
It is an old maxim that "it is wise to let vrell eiiougb 
alone,' 1 and it can perhaps nowhere be mure safely applied 

than in public business. While I have Suggested one or two 

subjects on which 1 think legislation is needed, and where 
certain changes would be improvements, yet it will be seen 

than in the Large interests of the State there will he need of 
little action save sneh as is wanted to sustain their present 

prosperous condition. Providence has smiled upon us and 
blessed ns in all onr public lite. May the same providence 
guide your deliberations at this Assembly, and direct them to 
the highest Lrnod of the whole commonwealth. 

HOBART B. BIGELOW, 



i 



REPORT 

01 i in I j 

TREASURER 



01 THE 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



TO THE 



General Assembly, January Session, 1882. 



FOI5 THE 



Fiscal Year ending November 30, 1881. 



HARTFORD, CONN. 

PBB88 09 Till. I iO, LOCXWOOD I BB 4 TWA BO OOMPAMT. 

1888. 



State of Connecticut, 



i 
i 



Trkasirkk's OffH 
Hartford, January Session, l vv _. 
To th> Honorable Speaker of the House of Representatives : 

SlB, — I have the honor herewith to transmit the Report of 
the Finances of this Department for the fiscal year ending 
with November 30. 1881, that it may be presented to the 
General Assembly. 

This report was prepared by the Hon. David P. Nichols, 
late Treasurer of the State, of whose honor, uprightness, and 
fidelity to his trusts, I desire to make most honorable men- 
tion. 

Very Respectfully, 

JAMES D. SMITH, 

Treasurer. 



\i E PORT 



State of Connecticut, 
Trbasi ber'b Office, Babtford, January, A. I). L882. 

To tit infill/: ■ 

1 have the honor to present the annual report of this 

department, showing the amount of revenue received and the 
payments made from the treasury during the fiscal year end- 
in- November 30, 1 681. 

Civil List Account. 
Balan ah on hand December 1. 1880, - $906,587.82 

iiue received during the year, - - 1,722,160.01 

$2,628,747.83 
Deduct payments as follows: 

List < trders, - - - $830,934.86 

Registered Ordere - - 386,481. m; 

S «• Bonds, - 288,450. 00 

Interest credited to the School Fund, 3,988.96 $1,50 

Balance to tlie credit of the Civil List, Dec 1. 1881, $1,118,892.55 

General and Special Accoun 
Balance to the credit of all accounts, Dec. 1, 1880, $1,091,04 
Receipts from all sources during the year, - 2,009,232.31 

$3,100,278.15 

Deduct payments for all purposes, - - 1.7: 



Balance to the credit of all account. Dec 1. 1881, f 



Showing a balance in the Treasury at the close of the fiscal 

ending with November 30, 1881, to the credit of the 

Civil List. School Fund, Sinking Fund, and other accounts 
amounting to one million, three hundred and seventy-thn-,- 
thousand, six hundred and thirty-nine dollars and sixty-eight 
cents. 



6 . treasurer's report. [Jan., 

State Debt. 
The amount of State Bonds outstanding at the close of the 
fiscal year was $4,967,600. 

The amount of the public debt, less the Civil List 

Fund, Dec. 1, 1880, was ... $4,061,012.18 

The amount of the public debt, less the Civil List 

Funds, Dec. 1, 1881, was 3.848,707.45 



Reduction of the public debt during the year, - $212,304.73 

Showing the debt of the State over the Civil List Funds on 
the first day of December, 1881, to have been three million, 
eight hundred forty-eight thousand, seven hundred and 
seven dollars and forty-five cents, and the reduction of the 
debt during the year two hundred twelve thousand, three 
hundred and four dollars and seventy-three cents. 

State Bonds. 

Thirteen thousand dollars of Coupon Bonds, received in 
exchange for Registered Bonds during the fiscal year ending 
Nov. 30, 1880, were burned by the Finance Committee of 
1881. 

The Coupon Bonds received in exchange for Registered 
Bonds during the past year amount to only five thousand dol- 
lars (15,000). 

The Registered Bonds transferred and surrendered, for 
which new certificates have been issued, amount to fifty thou- 
sand and five hundred dollars ($50,500). 

State Taxes. 

The State and military commutation taxes received from 
the several towns during the year amount to five hundred 
eighty-three thousand, six hundred and twenty-four dollars 
and ninety-six cents ($583,624.96). 

The amount remaining unpaid December 1, 1881, and 
which has since been collected, was ten thousand and twenty- 
eight dollars and fifty-one cents. 

The Military Commutation Tax due from the town of Glas- 
tonbury is still unpaid. 



L882.] 

HGfl Bab 

Tin- ed from the 3 Its amount to one 

hundred sixty-three thousand, >i\ hundred and nin< 
seven dollars and eighty-nine cenl 

DAL In-' R LNCE I lOMP LW 

The sd from the Mutual [nsurance Oompaniee 

of th»> State during the year amount to three hundred 

ninety-six thousand, three hundred and thirty-two dollars and 

nty ceo 2.70). Of this amount, the Mutual 

[nsurance Oompaniee have paid 1890,454.96, and the 

Mutual Fire Insurance Oompaniee 74. 

Railroad Tai 

The amount of railroad ceived during the year is 

throe hundred eighty-three thousand and forty-five dol- 
lars and fifty-four cents (338- >. This amount incl 
the taxes of the New York & \<w England Railroad, |45,- 
.98, and the (Tew Haven a Derby Railroad, 84,210.09, 
reported unpaid Dec. 1. 1 V S". and of the past-due 
3 of the Housatonic Railroad. 

The taxes ol the Oonnecticu Western Railroad rep 
unpaid Dec. 1. 1880, amounting to ?27.^m;.7:.\ and the t 
of the Shepaug Railroad, amounti 
by tb- ably of 1 v "l . 

Tbe railroad taxes remaining unpaid Dec. 1. 1881, are as 
follows: 

Connecticut Central Railroad, tax d 

October, ls^ - $2,826.00 

Connecticut ( iue 

Octet*- l.iss.00 

Connecticut Vail. ;ae 

SUJIl 
tford k Connect! 
id, tax dm 
Hartford & Connects Sail- 

road, tax due (>.- 






8 treasurer's report. [Jan., 

New Canaan Railroad, tax due Octo- 
ber, 1880, - - - 500.00 

New Canaan Railroad, tax due Octo- 
ber, 1881,' - - . 500.00 1,000.00 

New Haven & Derby Railroad, tax due October, 1881, 3,462.15 
New York & New England Railroad, tax due Octo- 
ber, 1881, - - - ' - - - 83,445.87 
Shepaug Railroad, tax due October, 1881, - - 669.68 
New London Northern Railroad, tax due October, 

1881, - - . - 14,777.55 

$122,002.79 

Since the close of the past fiscal year, the tax due from the 
New London Northern Railroad Company has been paid, and 
176,575.45 of the amount due from the New York & New 
England Railroad Company. 

The capital stock issued by several of the railroad com- 
panies of the State, which have come into possession of their 
railroad property by foreclosure, only represents a part of the 
bonds entitled to be exchanged for stock, and several of such 
companies in making their returns for taxation only include 
the amount of stock actually issued, thus leaving out from 
taxation the entire amount of bonds which have not been 
converted, and which represent in part the property of such 
companies, and which may be converted into stock at any 
time. The amount of such railroad bonds on the first day of 
October last was about twelve millions of dollars. Ought 
not these bonds to be so returned by the railroad companies 
that the property which- they represent may be taxed ? 

Governor Hobart B. Bigelow has paid into the Treasury 
the sum of one thousand four hundred and thirty-five dollars 
and eleven cents (11,435.11), received by him from the 
United States on account of claims due this State. 

The annexed tables and statement of accounts give in 
detail the receipts and disbursements of the Treasury during 
the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES D. SMITH, 

Treasurer. 



1882.J 






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10 



treasurer's report. 



[Jan., 



GENERAL REVENUE. 

taxes from towns payable november 10, 1881. 
Hartford County. 





Grand List. 


Tax of 
li mills on 


Commutation Tax. 


Amount 

unpaid 

Nov. 30, 

1881. 


TOWNS. 










the dollar. 


Persons. 


Tax. 


Hartford, - - 


£46,991,833 


$70,487.75 


4,086 


$7,354.80 




Avon, - - - - 


479,782 


719.67 


87 


156.60 




Rerlin, - - - - 


1,066,020 


1,599.03 


184 


331.20 




Bloomfield, - - - 


798,465 


1,192.70 


114 


205.20 




BristoJ, - - - - 


2,194,569 


3,291.85 


444 


799.20 




Burlington, - - - 


381,501 


577.25 


116 


208.80 




Canton, - - - - 


1,146,241 


1,719.36 


255 


459.00 




East Granby, - - 


498,845 


748.27 


61 


109.80 




East Hartford, - - 


1,792,402 


2,688.60 


288 


518.40 




East Windsor, - - 


1,188,626 


1,782.94 


257 


462.60 




Enfield, - - - - 


2,607,613 


3,911.42 


425 


850.00 




Fnrmington, - - 


1,678,879 


2,518.32 


207 


372.60 


$372.60 


Glastonbury, - - 


1,082,679 


1,624.02 


243 






Granby, - - - - 


500,309 


750.46 


180 


324.00 




Hartland, - - - 


263,834 


395.75 


78 


150.00 




Manchester, - - 


2,563,626 


3,845.44 


500 


900.00 




Marlborough, - - 


149,653 


224.48 


30 


54.00 




New Britain, - - 


4,748,647 


7,122.97 


1,429 


2,572.20 




Rocky Hill,- - - 


382,340 


573.51 


55 


102.00 




Simsbury, - - - 


1,083,949 


1,625.92 


181 


326.00 




Southington, - - 


2,137,011 


3,205.52 


463 


833.40 




South Windsor. - 


1,244,292 


1,866.44 


223 


406.00 




Suffield, --- - 


1,865,244 


2,797.87 


286 


514.80 




West Hartford, - 


2,116,904 


3,175.36 


165 


297.00 




Wethersfield, - - 


1,230,457 


1,845.69 


113 


226.00 




Windsor, - - - 


1,567,628 


2,351.44 


277 


498.60 




Windsor Locks, - 


711,613 


1,067.42 


161 


289.80 




Ne\vir;gton, - - - 


486,230 


729.34 


49 


88.20 




Plainville, - - - 


622,852 


934.28 


228 


430.00 






$83,682,0*4 


$125,373.07 


11,185 


$19,840.20 


$372.60 






L882.] 



KKl'OllT. 



11 



GENERAL im:\ i:\i B— (Continued). 

rAXES FROM u»\\ NS v.w ABLE NOVEMBER 1 

New Baton lnd N i:w London Counties. 



TOW NS 


Lift 


Nku 11 WIN. - - 


147,781,262 


Branford, - - - 


..171 


Bethany, - - - 


. i :. t 


Cheshire, - - - 


1,146,790 


Derbr, - - - - 


8,77 


: riven, - - 


2,07 


Guilford, - - - 


1. 1' 


Hamden, - - - 


1,618,606 


n, ... 


.717 


lieriden,- ... 


-.•214 


Middlebory, - - 


817,861 


Miltonl, --- - 


l.i 


Naugataek, - - 


l. g 14, 4 :.: 


North Branfbrd, - 




North Haven, - - 




Orange, - - - - 


2.17- 


1, - - - - 




Prospect, - - - 


171'. 144 


Seymonr, ... 


-.899 


Southbary, - - - 


1 .307 


Wallinpford, - - 


2,362,356 


\\ aterbnrv, - - 


8,816,041 


Woodbridge, - 


,720 


Wolcott,- - - - 




Beacon Fall?, - - 


304,868 



l:ix Of 
li mills on 

tin- dollar. 



1,8 

444.28 
1,870.18 
6,61 

I 10.00 

2,1 

2,4 

1,1 

18,4 

476.02 
1,7< 
2,421.68 

784.46 
1,17 

187.10 

1,42 

3,' - 
12,47 

631.08 

457.30 




Nsw Losdox, - •- 

Norwich, • - - 

Bosrah, - - - - 

Colche-ter, - - - 

Kast Lyme, - - - 

.in, - - - 

Grawold, - - - 

. - - - - 

Lebanon, - - - 

Ledyard, - - - 

. - - - - 

- - - - 

lie, - - - 

•i£ton, 

Old Lyme, 

too, - - - - 

. . . 

. . . 

- - 

. - - - 



•,572 
531 
1.3H1,096 

824, 
1,103 

781 
474,817 

881,130 

•,130 
1,181 



$9,960.47 
797.02 

1,940.48 

1,096 57 

712.28 

1,831.70 

- 

1,881.27 



60 
227 

292 
262 
264 

145 

41 

294 

618 
104 

1 18 

112 

53 

167 

121 

1,305 
B1 
41 
30 



- i. 270.64 



408.60 
1,4 

#71.60 
480.00 

8,08 

417.60 
201.60 

100.00 
814.00 
217.80 

2,:; I 
146.80 

60.0U 



Atnonnt 
unpaid 

N 
i-i. 






13,398 $24,771.80 §7,168 97 



848 
1,473 

65 
848 
161 

43 

17 ; 

108 

177 
146 
191 

17" 






.270 $59.1- J. 4 I 






1.46 
117.00 

78.00 

311.40 






12 



TREASURER S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



GENERAL REVENUE— (Continued). 

taxes from towns payable november 10, 1881. 

Fairfield and Windham Counties. 





Grand List. 


Tax of 

1^ mills on 


Commutation Tax. 


Amount 
unpaid 
Nov. 30, 

1881. 


TOWNS. 










the dollar. 


Persons. 


Tax. 


Bridgeport, - - 


$11,626,267 


$17,439.40 


3,120 


$5,616.00 




Danburv, - * - 


5,358,496 


8,037.74 


1,399 


2,518.20 




Bethel, * - - - - 


888,152 


1,332.23 


284 


511.20 




Brookfield, * - - 


600,824 


90124 


94 


169.20 




Darien, - - • - 


1,490,773 


2,236.16 


170 


340.00 




Easton, - - - - 


438,478 


657.72 


99 


178.20 




Fairfield, - - - 


2,203,260 


3,304.89 


293 


528.00 




Greenwich, - - - 


3,639,027 


5,458.54 


594 


1,069.20 




Huntington, - - 


1,011,211 


1,516.82 


179 


322.20 




Monroe, - - - - 


510,534 


765.80 


82 


148.00 




New Canaan, - - 


1,250,113 


1,875.17 


217 


390.60 




New Fail-field, - - 


417,050 


625.57 


61 


122.00 




Newtown, - - - 


1,828,114 


2,742.17 


298 


536.40 




Norwalk, - - - 


5,399,730 


8,099.60 


876 


1,577.00 




Reading, - - - 


854,342 


1,281.51 


129 


232.20 




Ridgefield, - - - 


1,115,892 


1,673.84 


164 


296.00 




Stamford, - - - 


6,920,103 


10,380.15 


789 


1,420 20 




Sherman, - - - 


364,334 


546.50 


67 


134.00 




Stratford, - - •- 


1,605,832 


2,408.75 


375 


675.00 




Trumbull, - - - 


624,260 


936.39 


116 


210.00 




Weston, - - - - 


419,910 


629.86 


72 


130.00 




Westport, - - - 


2,079,108 


3,118.66 


254 


458.00 




Wilton, - - - - 


711,613 


1,067.42 


121 


217.80 


SI, 067.42 




$51,357,423 


$77,036.13 


9,853 


$17,799.40 


$1,067.42 


Brooklyn, - - 


$1,462,979 


$2,194.47 


130 


234.00 




Ashford, - - - - 


327,987 


491.98 


119 


214.20 




Canterbury, - - 


592,002 


888.00 


97 


174.60 




Chaplin, - - - - 


233,696 


350.54 


41 


77.00 




Eastford, - - - 


232,120 


348.18 


75 


135.50 




Hampton, - - - 


363,457 


545.19 


71 


140.00 




Killingly. - - - 


2,185,588 


3,278.38 


455 


819.00 




Plainfield, - - - 


1,915,002 


2,872.50 


235 


440.00 




Pomfret, - - - 


770,622 


1,155.93 


106 


191.00 




Putnam, - - - 


1,802,210 


2,703.32 


308 


616.00 




Scotland, - - - 


335,375 


503.06 


55 


110.00 




Sterling, - - - 


301,762 


452.64 


83 


150.00 




Thompson, - - - 


1,827,350 


2,741.03 


244 


488.00 




Voluntown, - - 


224,672 


337.01 


71 


142.00 




Windham, - - - 


3,800,810 


5,701.22 


581 


1,045.80 




Woodstock, - - - 


987,922 


1,481.88 


207 


372.60 






$17,363,554 


$26,04533 


2,878 


$5,349.70 








treasurer's report. 



18 



i 



GENERAL REVENUE— (Continued). 

TAXES PROM towns PAYABLE NOVEMBER 10, 1881. 

Litchfield and Middlesex Counths. 



i 



TOWNS. 



Grand I-ist. 



Tax of 

lh mill- on 
tne dollar. 



CoMMUTATioa Tax. 






Amoanl 
anpal 1 

1881. 



I.ITl'IIHKI.D. 

Barkhamsted, 
Bethlehem, - 
Bridgewater, 
Canaan, - - 
Colebrouk, - 
Cornwall, - 
Goshen, - - 
Harwinton, - 
Kent,- - - 
Morris - - 
New Hartford, 
New Milford, 
k, - - 
North Canaan, 
Plymouth, - 
Roxbury, - 
Salisbury, - 
Sharon, - - 
Torrington, - 
Warren. - - 
Washington, 
Wfttertoun, 
Winch 
Woodbury, - 
Thomaston, 



MlDDLKToWN, 

Haddam, 

Chatham, - 
ir, - - 
Clinton, - - 
Cromwell, - 
Durham, 

t'l'iiun. 
- - 
Killinpworth, 
brook, 
Portia' 
Seybrook. - 
ook, - 
Middlefield, 



$2,01:. 
420,307 

417. '.<:i4 
516,749 
118,241 

472,825 
307, 9S4 

1,052,217 

1,041 

680,667 

1,016,872 
481,118 
1,004 

1,369,985 

l,4:;4.:-4'.' 

921,610 

1,6 7 8, 000 

2,807 

1,068,216 

1,441,377 



$8,028.22 
680.45 

626.00 

77:.. 12 
627.36 
918.88 j 

1,144.33 
725.13 
700.24 
551.98 

1,57 

2,91 1 

1,0;; 
25.81 

721.08 
2,867.29 
3,054.08 
3,161.82 

421.39 
1,882.26 
2,367.00 
4,211.02 
1,687 
2,162.07 



$25,720,672 $38,581.00 



-'.,345 

617,316 
488,218 

470,218 
1,811 

-.IK 



$9,339.62 
1,091.38 

640.88 

084.60 

l.i 2.78 

724.48 

844.86 



330 
63 

97 
111 
146 

86 

68 
130 

62 
806 
388 

96 
164 
227 

368 

242 
310 
56 
145 
164 
430 
266 
340 



4,630 

925 
142 
150 
104 

100 
136 
79 
260 
179 
. 76 

133 
76 
90 



$660.C0 

K.o.-JO 

11-./ 
133.40 

190.80 

292.00 l 

162.00 I 

133.40 

234.00 

113.00 

549.00 

176.00 

•2:> -.2- > 

420.00 

lofr.OO 

536.00 

480.00 

620.00 

100.80 

290.00 

296.00 

796.00 : 

478.80 

432.00 



$8,681.60 

$1,665.00 
384.00 

270.00 

188.00 
142.20 

162.0 I 
140.40 
600.40 

266.00 

180.00 



It 



treasurer's report. 



[Jan., 



GENERAL REVENUE— (Continued). 

taxes from towns payable november 10, 1881. 
Tolland County. 





Grand List. 


Tax of 
l 1 mills on 


Commutation Tax. 


Amount 

unpaid 

Nov. 30, 

1881. 


TOWNS. 










the dollar. 


Persons. 


Tax. 


Tolland, - - - 


$353,972 


$530.96 


68 


$123.00 




Andover, - - - 


234.542 


351.81 


39 


72.00 




Bolton, - - - - 


188.198 


282.30 


48 


96.00 




Coventry, - - - 


726,215 


1,089.32 


189 


340.20 


$1,429.52 


Columbia, - - - 


254,516 


381.77 


61 


110.00 




Ellington, - - - 


724,906 


1,087.36 


100 


180.00 




Hebron, - - - - 


475,271 


712.91 


97 


174.60 




Mansfield, - - - 


669,262 


1,003.89 


140 


252.00 




Somers, - - - - 


596,747 


895.12 


135 


265.50 




Stafford, - - - - 


1,100,211 


1,650.32 


369 


664.20 




Union, - - - - 


157,933 


236.90 


47 


84.60 




Vernon, - - - - 


2,670,395 


4,005.59 


520 


936.00 




Willington, - - - 


242,393 


363.59 


93 


168.00 






$8,394,561 


$12,591.84 


1,906 


$3,466.10 


$1,429.52 



RECAPITULATION. 





Grand List 

of 

October, 1880. 


Tax of 
1£ mills on 
the dollar. 


Commutation Tax. 


Amount 
unpaid 
Nov. 30, 

1881. 


COUNTIES. 


Number of 
Persons. 


Amt. of tax 
collected. 


Hartford, - - - 
New Haven, - - 
New London, - - 
Fairfield, - - - 
Windham,- - - 
Litchfield, - - - 
Middlesex, - - 
Tolland, - - - 


$83,582,044 
89,513,761 
39,456,270 
51,357,423 
17,363,554 
25,720,672 
16,782,571 
8,394,561 


$125,373.07 
134,270.64 
59,184.41 
77,036.13 
26,045.33 
38,581.00 
25,173.85 
12,591.84 


11,185 

13,398 
5,616 
9,853 
2,878 
4,630 
2,816 
1,906 


$19,840.20 

24,771.80 

10,285.60 

17,799.40 

5,349.70 

8,681.60 

5,202.80 

3,466.10 


$372 60 
m 7,158.97 

1,067.42 
1,429.52 




$332,170,856 


$498,256.27 


52,282 


$95,397.20 


$10,028.51 






treasurer's report. 



< 



AVAILS OF COURTS FKo.M CLERKS. 




Now H:iven, - - 

New Haven, - - 
Windham, - - - 
Tolland, - - - - 

II a rt for. 1, 

Fairfield, 
Litchfield, 



Name of Clerk. 



Common Pleas, John S. Fowler, 

Superior Court, Arthur D. Osborne, 

" Edward L. Condall, 

11 Erwin <). Ditnock, - 

Charles K. Fellowes, 

W. K. Norton, - - 

Wm. F. Hurlbut, - 



Common Pleas, 

Common 
District Court, 



Amount. 



187.21 

344.35 
62.31 



FINKS, FORFEITURES, ETC., FROM STATE ATTORNEYS. 



COUSTT. 



Attorney. 



Now Haven, - - - - Tilton E. Doolittle, - 

Middlesex, ----- Washington F. Willcox, 

Hartford, Win. Hamerslev, - - 

Tolland, Benezet H. Bill, - - 

London, - - - - Thos. M. Waller, - - 

Fairfield, Samuel Fessenden, 

Windham, ----- John I. Penrose, - - 

Litchfield, James Huntington, 



$4,418.59 

435.12 

2,110.72 

1,606.641 

3,161.86 
3,074.39 
2,243.5<j 
2,823.77 



>urN 
and I'. 



< 



$1,893.61 



$19,774.68 



$21,668.29 



MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 



From whom received. 



Remarks. 



Amount. 



Frank I). Sloat, in settlement of his account as Paymaster-General, - - 
L. w. w — Us, in settlement of his account as Quartermaster-General, 
Hubart I'.. Bigelow, Governor, on acct. of claims against the I'. S. Gov't. 
John R. Buck, amount returned from his debenture as a member of the 
BenatO for the .January Session of the General Assembly of 1881, 
tea of Olive Tyler and Lou Alain?, net proceeds of, 
W. T. BatcheUer, Comptroller, for Statutes sold, -------- 



I 

. 

100.00 
110.00 



- 



Receipts from the Commissioners of Pharmacy, - - 
pti from the Commissioners of Shell Fisheries, 



$831.10 



16 treasurer's report. [Jan., 



INSURANCE DEPARTMENT. 

Received from John W. Brooks, Insurance Commissioner, from December 
1, 1880, to November 30, 1881, ----.- $14,841.* 



BANK COMMISSIONERS. 

Received from Savings Banks, Trust Companies, and State Banks, the 
amount of the Comptroller's assessment for the salaries of the Bank 
Commissioners, $5,000.00 



BOARD OF RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS. 

Received from Railroad Companies the amount of the Comptroller's 
assessment for the office expenses and salaries of the Board of Rail- 
road Commissioners, ----------------- $11,071.50 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES. 

Received from Stiles T. Stanton, Executive Secretary, on account of fees 
of Notaries Public, $33.00 

Received from Morris F. Tyler, Executive Secretary, on account of fees 

of Notaries Public, - 309.00 

$342.00 



SECRETARY'S OFFICE. 

Received from Hon. David Torrance, Secretary, on account of fees of 
the Secretary's office, - $32.25 

Received from Hon. Charles E. Searls, Secretary, on account of fees of 
the Secretary's office, ----------------- 1,013.75 

$1,046.00 

INTEREST STATEMENT. 

RECEIPTS. 

Interest from New York & New England Railroad Co., - - $452.82 

" " New Haven & Derby, " " - - 127.43 

Interest on Certificate of Deposit received of W. E. Norton, - .75 

Interest on deposits, -------------- 24,555.52 

$25,136.52 

PAYMENTS. 

Interest credited to the School Fuud— Interest on the Principal, $1,990.28 

" " Revenue, 1,998.68 3,988.96 

Credit Balance, -------- $21,147.56 






TUT' UFPORT. 



17 



( 



TAX o\ MUTUAL FIRE [NSURANCE COMPANIES. 



N \MK OP COMPANY. 


•ion. 


rotal 1 


unt 
ible. 




;rv Mutuu. 1 'o., 


hanlmrv, 




$16,7 




Kan: 


- 








Farmingtoti VaDfj •• " " 


Farmington, 








. [eh Mutunl 


■'. icli, 


24, 






Hartford County •• 


Hartford, 


•j.'.: 


212, 




I Mutual 


Litchfield, 








y : 4 " 


Madison, 


33. v 






x •' Assurance " 


own, 








Norwich M M 


■h, 




11,7 




Co. Mnt. Fire Ins. Co., 


Norwich, 


60,036.48 


66.' 




. ille 


Rockville, 


8,631.44 


3,376.67 







Hartford, 


10U. 


211.62 




Tolland Countv M " M M 


Tolland, 


..'32.04 


81,81 


'•■14.15 


.. U .. II 


Brooklyn, 


32". 


46.: 






,176.16 


S783.703.83 


66,877.74 



i 



TAX oiT MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



NAME OF COMPANY. 



-Etna Life Insurance Co., - - - 
Charter Oak 1. fie I - ; :mce Co., 
Connecticut General Life I 
Connecticut Mutual 

Phoenix Mutual 



Location. Total Assets. 



Amount 
Taxable. 



Tax of i 

of one 
per cent. 



Hartford, $26,406,440.66819,710,261. 



-"..11 



$96,058,058.00 



•'.. 1 



S78,090,996.02 $3C" 



18 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



TAXES RECEIVED FROM MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 
COMPANIES OF MASSACHUSETTS ON THE VALUE 
OF POLICIES ISSUED BY THEM AND HELD BY 
RESIDENTS OF CONNECTICUT. 



NAME OF COMPANY. 


Value of 
Policies. 


Taxes for 
1880 & 1881. 


John Hancock Mutual Life Ins. Co., tax |of one per cent., 
Massachusetts " " " " " " " 
John Hancock " " " " " J " " 
Massachusetts " " " " " " " 


$76,591 

189,082 

73,369 

213,708 


$382.95 
945.41 
183.42 
534.27 






$2,046.05 



STOCKS ERRONEOUSLY REPORTED TO TOWN 

ASSESSORS. 



NAME OF CORPORATION. 


Location. 


Reported to 

Town 
Assessors of 


No. of 
shares. 


Market 
Value. 


Tax of 

one per 
cent. 


American National Bank, 


Hartford, 


Wethersfield, 


7 


$68 


$4.76 


iEtna Insurance Company, - 


tt 


Enfield, 


10 


225 


22.50 


National Fire Insurance Co., - 


u 




12 


140 


16.80 


Orient Insurance Co., - 


<< 




20 


120 


24.00 


Rockville National Bank, 


Rockville, 




3 


100 


3.00 


Orient Insrirance Co., - 


Hartford, 




40 


110 


44.00 


National Fire Insurance Co., - 


it 




20 


130 


26.00 


Connecticut Fire Ins. Co., 


" 


Pom fret, 


4 


120 


4.80 


American National Bank, 


" 


Wethersfield, 


7 


72 


5.04 


Windham Co. National Bank, 


Windham, 


Pomfret, 


10 


115 


11.50 


Hartford Fire Insurance Co., - 


Hartford, 


Enfield, 


10 


225 


22.50 




$184.90 



L882.] 






L9 



TAX ON NON-RESIDENT STOCK, 



i 



NAME OF CORPORATION. 



' 



- 
.Etna I. - 

Charter Oak Life Insurance Co., 
G ' 

• General Life h -■ " 
■ntal Life Insurance " 
Fairfield Fire 
Hartfor 

Hutford Life and Annuity Ins. Co., 
Hartf. - it Inspection 

ami Insurance Co., - 

ranee Co., - 
.'. Fire M " 

Orient M " 

x Mut. Life " M - 
e's " " 

Seen M " - - 

The Travelers M " - 

["rust and Safe Deposit Co., - 
Kquitable 1 ru-t Co., 
Middlesex Banking* 1 - 

ity u 

Thomp-onville Trust Co., 

Bank, 

1 Bridge Co., - 
Ik Fire Insurance Co., - 
.ix " - 

Meriden Fire *' " 

Hartford Tr " - 






Hartford, 



a walk, 
Hartford, 



Meriden, 
Hartford, 



Middletown, 

New Haven, 
Hartford, 

New London, 
Middle" 
Hart; 

Thompsonville, 
►id, 

lk, 
Hartford, 
Mer; 



81 

780 

1,478 

1,270 
L94 

6,110 
118 

1,510 

379 

237 
238 

-7 

8 

20 



I 
eaeh -Imre per cent. 



120.00 
103.00 



M0.76 

84 00 
22.11 

296.64 

869.04 



260.00 


12,85 


95.00 


168.65 


60.00 




55.00 




130.00 




110.00 




185.00 


11. 


50.00 




60.00 




30.00 


218.70 


200.00 




100.00 




70.00 


8,920.10 


90.00 




110.00 




25.00 








1 








185.00 




55.00 




100.00 






$76, •_ 



20 



TREASURER S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



TAX ON RAILROADS. 



NAME OF RAILROAD. 



Location of 
office. 



Number of 

shares of 

stock. 



o o 

CD p 
*§ 

£-= 

t> cfi , 

■x 2 o 
c «5 « 



© « 

2 H 

1^ 



° hfi 
B-Jj 
|1 

< 



Bridgeport Hors.e Railroad, - 
Fair Haven & Westville R. R., 
Hartford & Wethersfi'd H.R.R., 
N. H. & Centerville H. R. R,, - 
N. H. & West Haven H. R. R., 
Norwalk Horse R. R., - - - 
State Street Horse R. R., - - 
Westport& Saugatuck H.R.R., 

Boston & N. Y. Air Line R. R., 

Colchester R. R., 

Connecticut Central R. R., 
Danbury & Norwalk R. R., - 
Hartford & Conn. VallevR. R., 
Hartford & Conn. West. R. R., 

Housatonic R. R., - - - - 

Naugatuck R. R. - - - - 
New Canaan R. R., - - - 
New Haven & Derby R. R , - 
N. H. & Northampton R, R.. - 
New London Northern R. R., - 
N. Y. & New England R. R., - 
N. Y., N. H., & Hartford R.R., 
N. Y., Prov. & Boston R. R, - 
Norwich & Worcester R. R., - 

Rockville R. R., 



Shepaug R. R., - - - - 
Shoie Line R. R., - - - 
South Manchester R. R., - 
Watertown & Waterbury R.R. 



Add amount of past due taxes 
collected as follows, viz. : 

N. Y. & New England R. R., 
tax due October, 1880, - - 

New Haven & Derbv R. R., 
tax due October, 1880, 

Housatonic R. R.. in part, 



Total Amount of R. R. taxes 
rec'd during the fiscal year, 



Bridgeport, 
New Haven, 
Hartford, 
New Haven, 
New Haven, 
Norwalk, 
New Haven, 
Westport, 

New York, 

Colchester, 

Springfield, 

Danbury, 

Hartford, 

Hartford, 

Bridgeport, 

Bridgeport, 
N. Canaan, 
New Haven, 
New Haven, 
New London, 
Boston, 
New York, 
Stonington, 
Norwich, 

Rockville, 

Litchfield, 
New Haven, 
S.Manches'r 
Watertown, 



1,400 

9,000 

1,997 



2,454 

2,000 

923 

1§0 

Com., 8,185 

PPd, 28,125 

250 

4,485 

11,997 

6,520 

19,200 

Com., 8,200 

Pf d, 11,800 

20,000 



4,471 

24,600 

15,000 

87,430 

155,000 

30,000 

25,978 

Com., 687J 

PPd, 400' 

3,000 

10,000 

400 

2,364 



$ 

15.00 

90.00 





12.50 

5.00 

100.00 



50.00 





22.50 

62.00 

42.00 



105.00 

145.00 





50.00 

112.00 

50.00 

155.00 

130.00 

135.00 

1 

100.00 



120.00 







$50,000 







39,000 



12,700 





500,000 

25,000 

325,000 

500,000 

304,200 





850,000 





5fi5,000 

3,390,000 

1,499,500 

8,9<$,000 



1,300,000 

400,000 



18,000 

400,000 

260,000 



$0,000 



$14,755.77 







36,200.00 

500.00 

3,300.00 





, 



1,602.91 





15,000.00 



125,966.00 





72,258.00 

266,000.00 

212,000.00 

567,831.98 

417,594.22 



17,169.27 



2,549.75 





28,585.00 





L882.] 



i 



TAX ON RAILROADS. 



21 



fan 


1 for 

l 

out 


c _r 

o m 


on i 
not 
R.R. pui ■; 


«g _o 


KM 1 


< 


Anio . 
an] 
L881. 


... -.00.00 




$14 


, 





$49 































6,1> 








1,248.24 





























"io.oo 


7. 





702.00 












1.76 









00.00 







8. 





142.18 













1.76 































500. 





82,1 


50. 





18,841.1" 



















285.00 










o 


12.00 


•J 7. -J'. 








11, 488.00 


60<». 





11. 



















94." 












4,982.23 


. 00.00 


o 












8,2 





o 


o 






















o 


l 18, 




74. 





18 161.77 










174.75 









88.77 














o 











600.00 


."00.00 





13,123.00 


' 


13. 












3«6,208.58 


282,117.91 






60.96 


20,1 













181. 


65.00 





14,77 


,711.98 





88,72 


961.80 






















81.16 


178,2 





1,444, 














12,81 










35," 




66.48 




;3.16 





o 


o 


o 

















16,1 







30.78 


4.80 





■ 62 







o 















669.68 


•00.00 





2,690.00 





60. 

























886.86 















4.60 





38.00 



























J -2.98 





















4.210.09 

















. 


8,600.00 








$109, 



< 



22 



treasurer's report. 



[Jan., 



. 



TAX ON SAVINGS BANKS. 



NAME OF BANK. 


Deposits. 
Amount taxable. 


Tax of i of 
one per cent. 


Berlin Savings 


Bank, 




$18,206.88 


$45.52 


Bridgeport 


u 


_ 


2,828,879.77 


7,072.20 


Bristol 


<( 


_ 


445,263.75 


1,113.16 


Brooklyn 


II 


_ 


257,072.54 


642.68 


Canaan 


" 


_ 


15,271.63 


38.18 


Chelsea 


(C 


Norwich, - 


2,746,055.08 


6,865.14 


Chester 


C( 


_ 


11,776.13 


29.44 


Citizens 


k4 


Stamford, - 


614,975.83 


1,537.44 


City 


" 


Bridgeport, 


1,438,970.19 


3,597.42 


City 


ti 


West Mex-iden, - 


366,567.50 


916.42 


Colchester 


" 


- - 


81,136.73 


202 84 


Collinsville 


It 


_ 


198,942.76 


497.35 


Connecticut 


•• 


New Haven, 


2,561,340.17 


6,403.35 


Deep River 


u 


_ 


419,872.16 


1,049.68 


Derby 


" 


_ 


915,761.91 


2,289.40 


Dime 


" 


Cromwell, 


30,628.50 


76.57 


Dime 


" 


Hartford, - 


157,806.05 


394.51 


Dime 


" 


Norwich, - 


819,406.11 


2,048.52 


Dime 


" 


Thompson, 


262,037.71 


655.09 


Dime 


«( 


Wallingford, 


26,703.90 


66.76 


Dime 


u 


Waterbury, 


621,557.48 


1,553.89 


Dime 


it 


Willimantic, 


405,571.69 


1,013.93 


Essex 


" 


_ 


451,731.96 


1,129.33 


Fairfield Co. 


" 


Norwalk, - 


245,011.61 


612.52 


Falls Village 


" 


_ 


249,682.66 


624.20 


Farm. & Mech 


u 


Middletown, 


734,155.16 


1,835.40 


Farmington 


u 


-• 


1,645,924.93 


4,114.80 


Freestone 


11 


Portland, - 


134,752.48 


336.88 


Greenwich 


" 


- 


39,871.56 


99.68 


Groton 


« 


_ 


462,172.34 


1,155.43 


Guilford 


K 


_ 


58,522.82 


146.30 


Jewett City 


" 


- 


214,772.11 


536.92 


Litchfield Savings Society, - 


515,153.91 


1,287.88 


Mariners Savings Bank, 


New London, - 


917,310.88 


2,293.26 


Mechanics 


a 


Hartford, - 


834,694.56 


2,086.74 


Mechanics 


(i 


Winsted, - 


227,163.47 


567.90 


Mech. & Farm 


. " 


Bridgeport, 


115,812.14 


289.52 


Meriden 


" 


_ 


1.263,571.46 


3,158.92 


Middletown 


II 


- 


4,242,567.51 


10,606.42 


Milford 


" 


- 


15,098.22 


37.74 


Moodus 


" 


- 


69,246.54 


173.11 


National 


ii 


New Haven, 


510,978.19 


1,277.44 


Naugatuck 


t forward, 


- *- 


47,896.79 


119.74 


Amoun 


$28,239,895.77 


$70,599.62 






REPORT. 






TAX ON SAVINGS BANKS -(Continued). 


NAME OF BANK. 


Amount taxable. 


Tax of 1 «.f 
one per < 


it brought forward, 


■# 


_ 






Bank, 


- 


- 






New il 


- 


- 


4,041 


1".: 


44 


- 


- 






Newtown 


- 


- 


17.21 




Norfolk 


- 


- 


42,926.88 




Bty, 


- 


- 


1,489,871.88 




" 


- 


- 


6,498,661.87 


16 2 


ok, Bridg 


- 


1,086,891.72 




B Kville 


- 


- 


16.74 




Putnam 


- 


- 


638,4 




44 


- 


- 






oty, 
ink "f Ansonia, 


- 


- 


806,131.38 




- 


- 






Danbnrr, 


- 


- 


1,436,469.00 


: 


11 •■ -.in, - 


- 


- 


955,062.01 




lon, 


- 


- 


2,696,158.56 




11 Rockville, 


- 


- 


:-»6.66 




it 


- 


- 


15.38 


647.28 


" " Tolland, 


- 


- 




270.98 


Society for Sayings, Hartford, - 


- 


- 




18.7 


ington Savings Hank, 


- 


- 


271,660.32 




walk 


- 


- 




* 2 


:>ort 


- 


- 




1,118.14 


Stafford 


. 


- 


'•9.41 




jrd " 


- 


- 


1,278,208.44 


' 


" Hartford, 


- 


- 


M fi 


2,961.42 


Stonington 

Suffield 44 


- 


- 


447,1 


1,118.97 


- 


- 


66,81 




Thomaston " 


. 


. 


150,639.68 




Union 44 Danburv, 


- 


- 


368,462.63 


821.11 


bnry 44 


- 


- 


1,707,174.61 


• 


tport *' 


- 


- 


;7.68 


-• 


Willimantic Saving Institute, - 


- 


- 


448,9 


1,120.72 


Windham Co. Savings Bank, Danielsonv'e, 






L«or Locks 


- 


- 


1,884 


4.71 


ted M 


- 


- 




1,888.9* 


•ville 44 


- 


- 


160,987.84 


1 


Woodbury 4< 






778.41 






$65,479,205.02 


$163,697.89 



24 



treasurer's report. 



[Jan.. 



TAXES FROM AGENTS OF FOREIGN INSURANCE 
COMPANIES. 



AGENTS. 


Location. 


Tax. 


E. Marsh & Brother, 


. 




Bridgeport, 






$390.05 


Bacon & Guy, 


- 


- 


Middletown, 


- 


- 


60.99 


B. R. Allen, - 


- 


- 


Hartford, - 


- 


- 


122.57 


John Hemingway, - 


- 


- 


Southingtou, 


- 


- 


25.51 


Benj. J. Sturges, 


- 


- 


Norwalk, - 


- 


- 


17.58 


Geo. M. Carrington, - 


- 


. 


West Winsted, 


. 


- 


15.12 


A. W. Converse, 


- 


- 


Windsor Locks 


_ 


- 


11.33 


Charles C. Perry, - 


- 


- 


Southport, 


- 


- 


1.29 


C. B. Bowers, 


- 


- 


New Haven, 


. 


- 


164.30 


E. Marsh & Bro., - 


- 


- 


Bridgeport, 


_ 


- 


73.31 


C. S. Abbott & Co., - 


- 


- 


Waterbury, 


- 




60.96 


Benj. F. Hawley, 


- 


- 


Bristol, - 


- 


- 


30.40 


Wm. M. Hall, 


- 


- 


Wallingford, 


- 


- 


29.91 


Joseph Fuller, 


- 


- 


Suffield, - 


- 


- 


20.40 


W. H. Squire, 


. 


- 


Meriden, - 


- 


- 


4.93 


Thos. S. Brown, 




- 


East Hampton, 


. 


- 


.06 


John Lindley & Son, 


- 


- 


Ansonia, - 


- 


- 


111.93 


W. W. Andross, 


- 


- 


Rockville, 


- 


- 


3.30 


B. A. Russell, 


- 


- 


Greenwich, 


- 


- 


12.59 


A. G. Butler, 


- 


- 


Middletown, 


_ 


- 


16.73 


Geo. D. Coit,- 


- 


- 


Norwich, 


_ 


. 


43.91 


0. B. Grant, - 


_ 


_ 


Stonington, 
New Haven, 


_ 


- 


11.31 


A. E. Dudley & Son, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


120.83 


Luther S. Piatt, 


- 


- 


Naugatuck, 
Hartford, - 


_ 


- 


13.28 


Ralph Gillette, 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


307.27 


W. E. Baker, ■ - 


- 


■ _ 


<( 


- 


- 


478.46 


Silas Chapman, Jr., - 


- 


- 


(i 


- 


- 


586.98 


Joseph Schwab, 


_ 


_ 


it 


_ 


- 


14.56 


Miles L. Peck, 


_ 


_ 


Bristol, - 


_ 


_ 


136.74 


Geo. W. Lester, 


- 


. 


Hartford, 


_ 


. 


1.89 


W. S. Hanford, 


_ 


_ 


South Norwalk, 


- 


_ 


60.54 


L. Bissell & Son, 


- 


- 


Rockville, 


- 


- 


28.45 


B. W. Smith, 


- 


- 


Seymour, 


- 


- 


11.12 


N. J. Welton, 


- 


- 


Waterbury, 


- 


- 


117.92 


David H. Clark, 


_ 


_ 


Stamford, 


. 


- 


71.10 


E. M. Piatt, - 


_ 


_ 


Winsted, - 


- 


_ 


.14 


Thomas E. Packer, - 


_ 


_ 


Mystic Bridge, 


- 


- 


64.23 


Israel Newton, 


_ 


_ 


Suffield, - 


- 


. 


.15 


H. N. Trumbull, 


> 


_ 


Stonington, 
West Winsted, 


- 


- 


17.02 


Marshall Merrill, 


_ 


_ • 


_ 


_ 


.49 


F. W. Burrell, 


_ 


> 


New Hartford, 


_ 


_ 


3.97 


Elbert White, 


_ 


_ 


Stamford, 


_ 


_ 


6.40 


Sperry & Kimberly, 


- 


- 


New Haven, 


- 


- 


344.63 


R. C. Osborn, 


- 


_ 


Hartford, - 


- 


- 


8.46 


Asa W. Day, 


_ 


_ 


" 


_ 


- 


37.55 


David Brainard, 


- 


- 


Thompsonville, 






6.89 


Amount forward, 


$3,667.55 









TAXES FROM AGENTS OF FOREIGN INSURANCE 
COMPANIES— (Continued 



AGENTS. 



wanl, 
C. A 

- 
- 
L P. Trea Lwell, 

- 
- 
J. G. iJ" • iwin, 
W. !'. ; - 

iter, 
J. ¥. » - - 

- 

- 
- 
.1. F. Chamberlain, - 
Timol 

. - 
.T. F. Williams, 

.1. M. : 

H. C. Jo., - 

ft A. Hubbard, 

I irophrey, 
H. ,v I. S. Cannon," 

>, - 
1>. v, 

- 
I M. Roraback, 

.. 

M. I 

A. B, Adman & C 

- 
. GiUett,- 

Q, - 
- 
D N. Griswold, 
W. Brooks, 
S 

Co., 
C. H. Bigelow, 
It. H - - 

- 
Char:. 

Egbert Bartlett, 



Amount forward, 











:. - 




- 




New H iv--::. 




Danbury, 


41.76 


- 




- 


' 


:<1, - 


11.70 


.1, - 




Birmingham, 




- 
1 liven. 






nry, 




DanieU-onville, - 




3 




Danbury, 




Middle: own, 




rich, 




- 




Meriden, - 




- 




New Britain, 




New Haven, 




Meriden, - 




own, 


2.11 


ury, 




:i, - 




Bridge] 




■:. 


6.00 


' . - 




Willimantic, 


67.68 


Colch 




- 




own, 




- 




- 




•vilie, 




Birmingham, 


. 


Haiti 




- 




New Haven, 




- 




West H 


7.81 


Haven, 




- 




Ansonia, - 


94.04 





26 



treasurer's report. 



[Jan., 



TAXES FROM AGENTS OF FOREIGN INSURANCE 
COMPANIES— (Continued) . 



AGENTS. 


Location. 


Tax. 


Amount brought forward, 












$8,263.90 


John H. Hull, 


- 


- 


. 


- 


West port, 


- 


- 


11.60 


Parker Bros., 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Norwich, 


- 




290.76 


Chas. B. Bishop, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Litchfield, 


- 


. 


16.01 


J nmes Staples, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Bridgeport, 


. 


- 


451.53 


Pond Bros., for J. G. 1 


- 


- 


New Haven, 


- 


_ 


2.09 


Smith & Root, 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


Waterbury, 


- 


- 


651.54 


M. E. Mead, by N. 


B. Ins. 


Co., 


- 


- 


Darien, - 


- 


- 


.88 


Gardner Morse, 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


New Haven, 


- 


_ 


210.81 


James Staples, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Bridgeport, 


- 


_ 


13.48 


W. H. Goodspeed and W. 


A. Cone, 


- 


EastTladdam, 


_ 


_ 


49.79 


S. G. Beecher, 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


New Milford, 


_ 


_ 


.11 


Higbv & De Forest, 


. 


- 


- 


- 


Bridgeport, 


- 


_ 


475.18 


Miles L. Peck, 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


Bristol, - 


_ 


_ 


62.79 


John G. North & Co., 


_ 


_ 


_ 


New Haven, 


_ 


_ 


140.05 


E. T. Spooner, 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


Warehouse Point, 


_ 


10.33 


J.N. Stickney, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Rockville, 


. 


- 


37.75 


Silas F. Loonier, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Willimantic, 


- 


- 


52.63 


Josiah Raymond, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


We^tport, 


_ 


- 


9.53 


Geo. L. Beardsley, 


- 


- 


- 


^ 


Birmingham, 


- 


- 


8.72 


H. C. Warren, 


. 


_ 


_ 


_ 


New Haven. 


- 


_ 


161.95 


Jacob M. Lavton, 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


South Norwalk 


- 


- 


57.94 


C. L. Mason,' 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


Unionville, 


_ 


_ 


116.20 


John C. Broatch, 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


Middletown, 


. 


_ 


31.83 


L. S. Catlin, - 




- 


- 


- 


Bridgeport, 


- 


_ 


73.79 


C. S. Thompson, 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


New' Haven, 


_ 


.. 


176.44 


H. D. Hall, - 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


Middletown, 


_ 


- 


97.93 


George Palmer, 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


Branford, 


_ 


_ 


,60 


F. H. Alford, 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


New Britain, 


_ 


_ 


62.10 


Reuben Lord, Jr., 


_ 


_ 


. 


_ 


New London, 


_ 


_ 


10.67 


L. A. Dickinson, 


. 


_ 


- 


_ 


Hartford, - 


- 


_ 


104.94 


E. H. Sears & G. P 


. Edwards, 


- 


- 


Collinsville, 


- 


_ 


21.41 


Wm. H. Judd, 


. 


- 


- 


_ 


Stamford, 


- 


- 


4.50 


Lerov S. Preston, 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


Hartford, 


_ 


_ 


15.84 


E. H. Sears & 0. F 


Perry 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Collinsville. 


. 


_ 


21.90 


Jacob M. Lavton, 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


South Norwalk, 


_ 


_ 


3.97 


Hinsdale & Noble, 


. 


_ 


_ 


_ 


West Winsted, 


_ 


_ 


34.88 


H. C. Warner, 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


New London, 


_ 


_ 


33.05 


James E. Fuller, 


- 


_ 


. 


_ 


Norwich, 


. 


_ 


147.49 


Clark & Cowles, 


, 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Meriden, 


_ 


_ 


113.68 


C. N. Andrew, 


. 


_ 


- 


_ 


Willimantic, 


_ 


_ 


28.81 


A. L. Otis, - 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Meriden, - 


_ 


_ 


165.08 


0. E. Wilson, 


- 


. 


_ 


. 


Norwalk, - 


. 


_ 


2.24 


Franklin Smith, 


_ 


. 


_ 


_ 


Hazardville, 


_ 


_ 


§2.06 


Asa Perkins 2d, 


_ 


. 


_ 


. 


Groton, - 


_ 


_ 


2.60 


Frisbie, Chase & C 


0., 

rard, 


- 


- 


- 


New Haven, 






243.12 


Amount forv 


$12,524.50 






REPORT. 



27 



TAXES PROM AGENTS OF FOREIGN [NSURANC1 
►MPANIES— (Continued). 



( 



\ IS. 






ought 


for wan 1, - 


. 










Vf. H. Scribner, 


- 






- 


- 




W. I. Dunn, 


. 


- 




- 


- 




•:ing, 


. 


_ 


•• 


. 


- 




(;. n. M 


. 


. 




- 


- 




id, 


. 


- 


New Britain, 


- 


- 




N. D.S 


. 


- 


' 


- 


- 




K . A. Glad win, 


. 


- 


Middletown, 


- 


- 




- & Sort bend, 


_ 


. 


• ■ itain, 


_ 


. 


14.18 


A. B. Fairchild, 


. 


- 


, laven. 


. 


- 


' 


n, - 


- 


- 


- 


- 




& I'. E. Ely, - 


- 


- 


Tbomi • 


. 


- 




- 


_ 


. 


. 


. 




C. II. i 


_ 


. 


Putnam, - 


. 


_ 




Fred 1 : 


. 


_ 


Middle' 


- 


- 




Thoma*, 


_ 


. 


Tliom 


_ 


. 




W. II. P 


_ 


. 


Kiver, 


. 


. 




John I> 


- 


_ 


Greenwich, 


- 


- 




L. Palmer, - 


. 


. 


Danieli 


. 


- 




Geo. H. Lock wood, 


- 


_ 




_ 


_ 




- 


. 


_ 


Collinsville, 


. 


. 




- 


. 


_ 


ndon, 


_ 


. 


3.18 


1 ■•• ■::. - 


. 


. 


New H 


_ 


• 




Flv. 


. 


. 


Putnam, - 


. 


- 






_ 


. 


New Britain, 


_ 






L Fuller, 


. 


_ 


li - 


. 


. 


1.76 


L. H. 1 


. 


. 


Putnam. - 


. 


. 




- 


. 


_ 


Hartford, - 


. 


- 


Son, 


. 


. 


•ndon. 


. 


- 




. 


. 


Middletown, 


_ 


. 


i , 


. 


_ 


Meriden, - 


_ 


. 


. - 


. 


_ 




_ 


. 


0. K. U 


. 


. 


!k, - 


. 


- 




_ 


_ 


Willimantic, 


. 


. 




A. I. - 


. 


. 




. 


. 




. - 


. 


. 


Stain: 


_ 


_ 




H:irrv Bell. - 


. 


_ 










- 


. 


_ 


■ illage, 


. 


- 






- 


. 


: 


. 


. 




S. V. St J ..-. 


- 


. 


. 


- 


. 




.1. < ' | 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 




S. K. I. 


. 


. 




. 


. 




- 


. 


- 


rd,- 


. 


. 




. Ir.. 


. 


. 










1 


. 


. 


tlk, 


. 


. 




- 


- 


- 


-iver, 








mt forward, 





28 



treasurer's report. 



[Jan., 



TAXES FROM AGENTS OF FOREIGN INSURANCE 
COMPANIES— (Continued) . 



AGENTS. 


Location. 


Tax. 


Amount brought forward, 






$14,861.99 


Weld & Son, 


_ 


_ 


New Haven, 


16.92 


B. P. Learned, 


_ 


_ 


Norwich, - 


138.66 


C. W. Preston & Co., 


_ 


. 


Hartford, 


69.11 


James H. Hill, 


_ 


_ 


New London, 


131.68 


Aaron H. Lane, 


- 


_ 


Chappaqua, N. Y., 


3.57 


Continental Ins. Co. for C. J. Wright, 


- 


Greenwich, 


3.37 


A. L. Stevens, 


- 


_ 


Meriden, - 


2.07 


B. E. Cowperthwaite, 


- 


- 


Danlmrv, 


207.49 


C. W. Preston & Co., 


_ 


. 


Hartford, - 


80.54 


C. W. Breston & Co., 


- 


- 


" - 


24.07 


0. K. Wilson, 


_ 


_ 


Norwalk, 


.80 


J. W. Chandler, 


_ 


_ 


Stafford Springs, 


2.65 


A. B. Fairchild, 


_ 


- 


Bridgeport, 


3.07 


C. W. Preston & Co., 


. 


_ 


Hartford, 


33.18 


LInion Mutual Life Ins. 


Co., 


_ 


Portland, Me., - 


110.88 


H. A. Baker, 






Montville, 


10.74 




$15,700.79 



TAX ON TELEGRAPH COMPANIES. 



NAME OF COMPANY. 


Office. 


Receipts. 


Amt. of Tax. 


American Rapid Telegraph Company, 
Connecticut River " " 
Tolland. " " 
Western Union " " 
Woodbury " " 


Boston, 
Hartford, 
Tolland, 
New York, 
Woodbury, 


$12,939.10 

2,309.41 

151.G7 

165,000.00 

275.17 


$258.78 
46.19 

3.03 
3,300.00 

5.50 




$180,675.35 


$3,613.50 












TAX oN GROSS PREMIUMS H ED PROM fNSUR 

ANCE COMPANIES OF -TAT!: OF NEW FORK. 



x \Mi: OF I ORPORAT* 


.'i<»n. 




•• per 








- 




• 










• 




7.1 • 




"■ V .'- RgUt ' 


>. 


<< 


1.1 12 




•• l'ark 


• 


.. 


1.1 




•• N. V. City ' 


. 


<< 




. 


•• 1 


'• 


11 








• 


<« 








. . 








• • K 










• 


• 










<< 






" Metropt litan i 


<< 


1 J 




,:iv, 


(« 


21, 




•• 


Glen- 






. 


Turk, 


1.-V 




•• ! 




6,474.17 




Tiiar 


New York, 




1 


-..cry •• 


<< 


1. 




•' N 




1,17 




vial M 


«< 




' 


.. 


<« 






.. 


Albany, 






•' Wart-:: •• " 


•own, 






'hern 






. 


u 


New York, 






Star 


ii 






ublic 


«< 






nens 


•• 






H 


<< 






.. 


«i 


17, 




.. 


<« 






.. , 


<( 






•• V, 


ii 


18,108.08 








•U 



( 

< 



TAX ON EXPRESS COMPANIES. 



Ml' A NY. 


Office. 




Amt. of Tax. 


eae Compar 

( 'o., - 


ton, 


•10,1] 


$4.' 




• 


$4- 



clO treasurer's report. [Jan., 
STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. 

Dr. CIVIL LIST. 

To paid Civil List Orders, - $830,934.86 

" Registered Orders, * - - 386,481.46 

" Interest on State Bonds, ------ 288,450.00 

" Interest credited to the School Fund, - 3,988.96 



$1,509,855.28 
To balance to December 1, 1881, $1,118,892.55 



$2,628,747.83 



Dr. SCHOOL FUND. 

To Revenue Loan unpaid December 1, 1880, - $1,293.20 

To paid Commissioner's orders from the principal, - 102,220.00 

To paid Commissioner's orders from the revenue, - 6,985.10 

To paid Comptroller's orders from the revenue, - 104,963.50 

To balance of principal to December 1, 1881, - 87,295.03 

To balance of interest to December 1, 1881, ■» 77,900.47 

$380,657.30 



Dr. PRINCIPAL OF THE TOWN DEPOSIT FUND. 






RFrORT. 






I 



STATEMENT OF ACTnrNTS. 



CIVIL LI8T. 

, - 

1 ". munitioners of Pharmacy, - 

from Commissioners of Shell-fishe 
Bj root ' anmissloners 1 salaries, 

I Board of Railroad Commli 

Commissioner, ... 

By mil - 

- from Executive Secretaries, - 

By tux on gross preminn tnce Companies of New York. 

By taxes from Mutual Life Insurance Companies of Massachusetts 

- 

By tax on Telegraph Companii --___-_- 

Companies, ----- 

Mutual Insurance Companies, - - - - 

By tax on Railros -___.. 

By tax j Banks, - 

il lent stock, ----- 
By tax rroneonsry returned to Town Asse- 

By taxes from Agents of Foreign Insurance Companies, - 
By Interest Account, ------ 



1881, December 1. By balance, 






- 

11,1 

21,1 
1,0 

- 

l.' 

- 

8,1 

4. 

- 
- 
- 1- 

to. a 

184.90 
16,1 

.136.52 

$2,628,747.83 
•1,118, 



( 



SCHOOL FUND. 



By balance of principal, December 1, 1880, 

By collection of principal, - 

tnce of interest, December 1, 1880, - 
By collection of interest, - 



122, 143.30 



1881, I 
1881, i 



By balance of principal, 
By balance of inn 



$380,657.30 

"0.47 



PRINCIPAL OF THE TOWN DEPOSIT KIND. 

1881. Doc. 1. Bv baton 






32 treasurer's report. [Jan., 

STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. 



Dr. INTEREST OF THE TOWN DEPOSIT FUND. 

1881, Nov. 30. To interest paid towns, - - - - - $1,425.59 

1881, Nov. 30. To balance forward, ------ 566 02 

$1,991.61 



Dr. STATE LIBRARIAN. 

1881, Nov. 30. To paid Librarian during the year, - $464.00 

1881, Nov. 30. To balance forward, - - - - - 1,536.00 

$2,000.00 



Dr. LICENSE FEES. 

1881, Nov. 30. To License Fees remitted to the Treasurer of Connecticut 

Agricultural Experiment Station, ----- $725.00 



Dr. STATE PRISON MEDICAL SOCIETY. 



Dr. „ STATE PRISON GRANT. 



Dr. DORSEY STATE PRISON FUND. 



Dr. UNCLAIMED DEPOSITS RECEIVED FROM COUNTY TREASURERS. 



Dr. SINKING FUND ACCOUNT. 



L882.] TBii 88 

STATEMENT OF ACCOUNT 

INTEREST OF THE POWN DEPOSIT kind. 
1881, Dtt. 1. By baUnc - - - - 1668.81 

1881, Not. 80 By Interest reoi - 1.422.00 



( 



1881, Dec. 1. By balance. - ..... 8668.09 



STATE LIBRARIAN. I .:. 



1680. By amount of appropriation. ..... $2,000.00 

1881, Deo. 1. By balance. $1,636.00 



LICENSE PEES. Cb 

M>. Bv Licence Fees received from State Secretarv.- - 6786.00 



STATE PRISON MEDICAL SOCIETY. I r. 

1881, Dec. 1. By balance, 81,455.00 



STATE PRISON GRANT. C*. 

1881, Dec. I. .By balance, 86,770.96 



DORSEV STATE PRISON FUND. « n. 

1881, Dec. 1. By balance, $1,666.66 



UNCLAIMED DEPOSITS RECEIVED FROM COUNTY TREA8UBEB& Ob. 

1881, Dec. 1. By balance, 83,189.50 



SINKING FUND ACCOUNTS. 
1881, Dec. 1. By balance of interest of Sinking Fund of 1862, - - 848,935.84 

1881, Dec. 1. By balance of interest of Sinking Fund of 1864, - 






34 treasurer's report. [Jan , 

STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. 

Dr. BALANCES BELONGING TO THE SEVERAL FUNDS. 

Cash to balance, ------- $1,373,639.68 



$1,373,639.68 



GENERAL BALANCE. 

Dr. DAVID P. NICHOLS, TREASURER, IN ACCOUNT WITH 

To Receipts.— Civil List, including balance December 1, 1880, - -$2,628,747.83 

Principal of the School Fund, - - - 189,515.03 

Interest of the School Fund, - 189,849.07 

Principal of the Town Deposit Fund, - - - 60.14 

Interest of the Town Deposit Fund, - - - 1,991.61 

State Librarian, ------ 2,000.00 

License Fees received from State Secretary, - - 725.00 

. State Prison Medical Society, - 1,455.00 

State Prison Grant, ------ 5,770.96 

Dorsey State Prison Fund, ----- 1,666.66 

Unclaimed Deposits received from County Treasurers, - 3,189.50 

Interest of Sinking Fund of 1862, - - - - 48,935.84 

Interest of Sinking Fund of 1864, - 26,371.51 

$3,100,278.15 



1882.] Ti; 'fl UPOBT. 

STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. 



BALANCES BELONGING TO I BE SEVERAL l'i \ 

Civil List. fl.118,8M.66 

Principal of the School Fun.l, - - ... 

Interest of the School Fund, ------ 

Principal of the Town Deposit Fund, ----- 

Interest of the Town Deposit Fund, 

Librarian, • .... i,.-,. 

1 icon Medical Society, - 
State Prison Grant, -------- '..770.96 

State Prison Fund, ------ 

rnchuined deposits received from County Trea-un | • - '..189.60 

Interest of Sinking Fund of 1862, ------ 48,936.84 

Interest of Sinking Fund of 1>»;}, ...... *«,871.61 



- 



GENERAL IJA LANCE. 

THE STATE OF < ONNECTICUT. Ob. 



By Payments.— Ciril Lbl - 

Principal of the School Fund. 

Interest of the School Fund, 

Revenue of the School Fund, 

Interest of the Town Deposit Fund. 

State Librarian, - - - - 

License Fees paid Treas. of Agl. Experiment Station, 



By balance of Cash to December 1, 1881. - - - -Si. 



- $1,509,- 


102,220.00 


- 104,968.50 


6,985.10 


- 


464.00 


ion. - 


$1.7. 






36 treasurer's report. [Jan.,. 



State of Connecticut, Treasurer's Office, 
Hartford, December 20, 1881. 

We, the undersigned, Auditors of Public Accounts, do 
hereby certify that we have examined the accounts of the 
State Treasurer for the fiscal year ending with November 30, 
A. D. 1881, and have compared said accounts with the several 
vouchers and find them correct, and that the cash in the 
Treasury at the close of business on the 30th day of Novem- 
ber, 1881, amounted to one million, three hundred seventy- 
three thousand, six hundred and thirty-nine dollars and sixty- 
eight cents ($1,373,639.68). 

R. W. FARMER, ) A ,.. 

THOMAS I. RAYMOND, \ Jluauors ' 

WHEELOCK T. BATCHELLER, 

Comptroller. 



School Fund Office, 
Hartford, December 21, 1881. 

I hereby certify that the foregoing Treasurer's Report is 
correct so far as it relates to or is connected with the School 
Fund. 

JEREMIAH OLNEY, 

Commissioner. 



RKPORT 



0? mi. 



< 



Comptroller of public lr counts V 



STATE OF fONNECTKTT, 



Gbnbrai Assembly, January Session, 1882. 



Printed by Order of tl^e (^ei^efkl S^emfcly. 



BARXFORD, OONN 
Tiik Cabb, Logkwood A iiiuinai'.ii ( a., P*umm l 



I 



State of Connecticut. 



COMPTROLLER'S REPORT. 



St \tk of ( !onn» rici i. 

"ii ROLl BB's < 'ni' D, J w m:v I. A 1 I I 
I HotUi of /.''/ 

I have the honor to present herewith my Annual Report of the 
tran- if this Department for the fiscal year commenc 

ember I, 1880, and ending November 30, L881. 

RECEIPTS \M> EXPENDITUR 

The receipts from all sources for the Civil List during ?!.• 
ending November .;<•. L881, including tin' balance oi account De 
■ i nine hundred and >ix thousand five hundred 
and eighty-seven and ,•*„-,, dollars (f r.82), were two million 

six hundred and twenty-eight thousand seven hundred ami f< 
seven and ffy dollars ($2,628 . 
The expenditures during the same period, including the 
wo hundred and eighty-eighl thousand four hundred and fifty 
dolh. ,450.00) paid as interest on outstanding State B 

one million live hundred ami nine thousand eight hundred 
fifty-five and 1 2 ,;„ dollars ($1,5 < aving a balance in 

■''I of 

r, 1881, <>f one million one hundred and . 
Jit hundred and ninety-two and 1 "; i ' i dollars ($1,118 

of the £ 

;d appro] <i and tW( 

thousand dollars ($121,000.00), which should th 
the balance now in th< ry. 



comptroller's report. 



[Jan., 



THE GRAND LIST. 

The Grand List of the State for October, A.D. 1880, amounts to 
the sum of three hundred and thirty-two million one hundred and 
seventy thousand eight hundred and fifty-six dollars ($332,170,- 
856.00.) This is an increase of four million nine hundred and 
eighty-eight thousand four hundred and twenty-one dollars 
($4,988,421) over the amount of the preceding year. 

In the following tables I have given the total list of taxable 
property in each town in the State, as returned to this office by 
the clerks of the several towns, for 1879 and 1880. 

GRAND LIST OF THE STATE OP CONNECTICUT FOR 
THE YEARS OF 1879 AND 1880. 



HARTFOED COUNTY. 



Towns. 

Hartford, 

Avon, 

Berlin, 

Bloomfield. 

Bristol, 

Burlington, 

Canton, 

East Granby, 

East Hartford, 

East Windsor, 

Enfield, 

Farmington, 

Glastonbury, 

Granby, 

Hartland, 

Manchester, 

Marlborough, 

New Britain, 

Rocky Hill, 

Simsbury, 

Southington, 

South Windsor 

Suffield, 

West Hartford 

Wethersfield, 



October, 1879. 


October, 1880. 


$46,255,339 


$46,991,833 


467,523 


479,782 


1,125,847 


1,066,020 


799,496 


798,465 


2,151,708 


2,194,569 


382,597 


381,501 


1,066,753 


1,146,241 


488,628 


498,845 


1,778,193 


1,792,402 


1,185,151 


1,188,626 


2,573,286 


2,607,613 


1,613,439 


1,678,879 


1,096,479 


1,082,679 


504,126 


500,309 


254,571 


263,834 


2,438,304 


2,563,626 


147,886 


149,653 


4,669,354 


4,748,647 


374,619 


382,340 


1,009,050 


1,083,949 


2,050,243 


2,137,011 


1,253,925 


1,244,292 


1,852,682 K 


1,865,244 


1,828,164 


2,116,904 


1,217,946 


1,230,457 









< « »m i»-| i:« M i i:i; - i;i 



. n». 






Wind 


1 1 II 




Win Id, 1 18 


71 


\ 


. 




Plain ville, 


6U,849 




•al. 


. : r»; 






NKW II \\ K\ 001 WTT, 






October, I 




New Elaven, 


. $46,968,387 






1,311,660 


3,171 




,065 




ire, 


1,222,141 


1,241 


<y. 


3,710,870 




Havni. 


2,069,248 


2 "7 


Gnilfi 


1,477.884 


1,46 


Ham 


1,711,456 


1,62 


-on, 


. 


,717 


Leu, 


8,875,8i:» 


3,21 1 


. 


315,242 


317 


Milford, 


1,143,120 


1.1. 


k, 


1,583,852 


1,61 


Hranforc 


1. . 191,744 


.636 


h Haven, 


188 




.<^e, 


■2.' . 


2, 1 7 




395,71u 


39' 




181,656 


179,144 


- 


884.' 




hbnry, 


. 




.. 


155,118 






154,208 






. 




Wok 


221 • 






261 




Total. 


. $88,188,9 





( 



comptroller's report. 



[Jan., 



NEW LONDON COUNTY. 



Towns. 






October, 1879. 


October, 1880. 


New London, . . $6,450,028 


$6,640,313 


Norwich, 






13,349,295 


13,169,572 


Bozrah, 






522,020 


531,344 


Colchester, 






1,400,358 


1,391,096 


East Lyme, 






551,643 


595,845 


Franklin, 






314,965 


324,657 


Griswold, 






1,261,607 


1,293,652 


Groton, 






2,095,761 


2,065,280 


Lebanon, 






1,098,485 


1,102,289 


Ledyard, 






520,109 


513,379 


Lisbon, 






284,458 


283,519 


Lyme, 






297,001 


291,942 


Montville, 






1,045,469 


1,068,645 


North Stoningt 


on, 




734,798 


731,047 


Old Lyme, 






459,222 


474,817 


Preston, 






865,264 


881,130 


Salem, 






263,145 


255,549 


Sprague, 






1,187,994 


1,197,883 


Stonington, 






5,175,279 


5,390,130 


Waterford, 






1,038,575 


1,254,181 


Total, 


. $38,915,476 


$39,456,270 


FAIRFI] 


LLD COUNTY. 




Towns. October, 1879. 


October, 1880. 


Bridgeport, . . . $11,720,503 


$11,626,267 


Danbury, 






5,136,529 


5,358,496 


Bethel, 






880,188 


888,152 


Brookfield, 






594,894 


600,824 


Darien, 






1,519,520 


1,490,773 


Easton, 






441,020 


438,478 


Fairfield, 






2,204,410 


2,203,260 


Greenwich, 






3,636,259 


3,639,027 


Huntington, 






931,387 


1,011,211 


Monroe, 






533,850 


510,534 


New Canaan, 






1,248,988 


1,250,113 


New Fairfield, 






428,249 


417,050 


Newtown, 






1,831,536 


1,828,114 



[882.] 

Tou 

palk, 
ling, 
efield, 
ford, 

Sherman, 
tford, 

Trumbull, 

West 
Wilton, 

Total 



0OHPTBO1 

1,076,106 
52,906 
361 

1 59$ 
621,459 
123 

■1.117 

764 



$50,893,019 



1.1 l 

0,103 

364 
1,60 

62 : 

119 
2,079,106 

711,613 



( 
( 



WIMiHAM COUNTY. 



Ton 

Brooklyn. 
Ash; 

Brbury 

plin, 
ord, 
Ham{>t<m. 
Killii,. 
Plain] 

Putnam, 
rod, 

Thorn 

Windham, 

Total. 



October, 1879. 


October, 1880. 


$1,534,7 1 4 






:;•_', 


566,851 


592,002 


24 1 , 1 




913 


5,120 




36:; 


2,172,767 


•_'. 1 B 


1,880,002 


1,915,002 


772,216 


77" 


1,800 


1,802,210 


338,102 




304,380 


301 


1,821,915 


l>j. 


214, 


224 


1,197 


10,810 







$17,106,1 15 



| 



Towns. 

Barkhai! 

lehem, 
Bridge* 



Ill 
122,175 



- 

in 



8 



comptroller's report. 



[Jan., 






Towns. 
Canaan, 
Colebrook, 
Cornwall, 
Goshen, 
Harwinton, 
Kent, 
Morris, 

New Hartford 
New Milford, 
Norfolk, 
North Canaan, 
Plymouth, 
Roxbury, 
Salisbury, 
Sharon, 
Torrington, 
Warren, 
Washington, 
Watertown, 
Winchester, 
Woodbury, 
Thomaston, 

Total, 



October, 1879. 


October, 1880. 


537,519 


516,749 


422,438 


418,241 


630,769 


612,585 


755,953 


762,886 


471,421 


483,412 


469,391 


472,825 


366,084 


367,984 


1,042,976 


1^052,217 


1,932,217 


1,945,854 


774,069 


792,377 


668,103 


689,567 


957,538 


1,016,872 


485,312 


481,118 


1,936,718 


1,904,862 


1,368,808 


1,369,985 


1,406,156 


1,434,549 


264,793 


280,929 


951,159 


921,510 


1,584,957 


1,578,000 


2,713,156 


2,807,349 


1,088,029 


1,058,216 


1,378,356 


1,441,377 



$25,428,807 



$25,720,672 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



Towns. 

Middletown, 

Haddam, 

Chatham, 

Chester, 

Clinton, 

Cromwell, 

Durham, 

East Haddam, 

Essex, . 

Killingworth, 

Old Saybrook, 

Portland, 

Saybrook, 



October, 1879. 


October, 1880. 


$6,033,687 


$6,226,345 


730,791 


727,589 


605,588 


617,316 


426,549 


433,218 


650,322 


656,335 


714,540 


735,154 


463,719 


470,218 


1,284,798 


1,316,779 


1,066,851 


1,023,034 


229,647 


231,504 


544,395 


717,089 


1,914,715 


1,938,116 


624,908 


643,649 



1882 | 



COMPTROLLER'S REPORT. 



Town*. 






Octolxr, 1879. 




Westbrook, 




Middletield, . 574,951 




Total, 


. $16,340,821 


^ir.,73'J.:,7 1 


IND COUNTY. 




Town*. October, 1879. 


bar, 1880. 


Tolland, $35s,<;tio 




Andover, 






230,855 


14,542 


Bolton, 






193,552 


188,198 


Coventry. 






7 17,635 


726,215 


Columbia, 






282,389 


25 i, 516 


Ellington, 






715,771 


7-_'4.:mm; 


Hebron, 






468,<;r>2 


475,271 


Mansfield, 






657,646 


669,JC,i> 


Somers, 






591,655 


596,747 


Stafford, 






1,094,153 


1,100,211 


Union, 






158,998 


157,933 


Vernon, 






2,604,709 


2,670,395 


Wellington, 






242,312 


24 2 


Total, $8,317,027 


$8,394,561 


TO UNTIES. 




Counties October, 1879. 


Octoh 


Hartford, . . $81,992,176 


$83,582. i'U 


New Haven, 


88,188,994 


89,513,761 


New London, . 




m:>.4 7»; 


• 156*270 


Fairfield, 






50,893,019 


51,357,423 


Windham, 






17,106.1 15 


1 7. :;»;:;. :.:.i 


Litchfield, 






128,807 


25, 720, 672 


Middlesex, 






16,340,821 


16,782,571 


Tolland, 






8,:n7,ir_'7 




Total 






■$332,1 7o. s;,6 



< 



10 



COMPTROLLER'S REPORT. 



[J 



an.. 



The following is an estimate of Receipts and Expenditures for 
the year ending November 30, 1882. 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS. 



Balance in the Treasury, Dec. 1, 1881, $1 

Miscellaneous Receipts, 

Commissioner of Insurance, . 

Banks, for salaries of Commissioners, . 

Railroads, for salaries of Commissioners, 

Interest on Deposits, . 

Fees from Secretary of State, . 

Fees from Executive Secretary, 

State Tax from Towns, 

Military Commutation Taxes, . 

Telegraph Companies, . 

Savings Banks, 

Railroad Companies, . 

Non-Resident Stockholders, 

Express Companies, 

Mutual Insurance Companies, . 

Agents of Foreign Insurance Companies, 

Avails of Courts and Bonds, . 

Commissioners of Pharmacy, . 

Commissioner of Shell Fisheries, 



,118,892.55 

1,000.00 

14,000.00 

5,000.00 

11,000.00 

20,000.00 

1,000.00 

300.00 

498,256.00 

95,000.00 

3,500.00 

160,000.00 

385,000.00 

75,000.00 

4,000.00 

295,000.00 

15,000.00 

15,000.00 

800.00 

8,000.00 



Estimated Balance in Treasury, Dec. 1, 1882, 



$2,725,748.55 
$1,215,802.55 



ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES. 



Sessions of the General Assembly, 
Salaries and Expenses in Executive 

Offices, 
Judicial Expenses, 
Board of Prisoners in County Jails, 
State House, 
Contingent Expenses, . 
Seate Board of Education, 
State Normal School, . 
State Normal School for Balance of 

Appropriation of 1881, . 



. $106,000.00 



225,000.00 
60,000.00 
25,000.00 
10,000.00 
12,000.00 
12,000.00 

60,000.00 






COMPTKOLLEH 



11 



Common S ... 


220,000.09 


. 




. 


11,000.00 


•1. . 


000.00 


Connecticut Industrial School, . 


I mm. no 


nor's Guards, 




. 


10.00 


Humane [natitutioE 


1 [0,000.00 


Igeport Hospital, appropriation of 




181, .... 


50,000.00 


tecticnt Hospital for the Insane, for 




Balance of Appropriation 


5,000.(10 


'.cultural A Hairs, 


14,000.00 


nal Guard, 


90,000.00 


Printing and Circulating Public Laws 




and Documents, 


32,000.00 


Soldiers' Children. 


00.00 


ers. 


5,000.00 


Fish Commissioners 


6,000.00 


State Board of Health, 


3,000.00 


Railroad Commissioners, 


11, 000. (hi 


Insurance Commission- 


15,000.00 


Bank Commie 


5.00' 


Amount of Taxes Refunded, . 


1,000.00 


inissioners for grading Capitol 




grounds. .... 


10,000.00 


missioners for grading Capitol 




grounds, Appropriation of ! 


10.00 


Comi. of Pharmacy. . 


•III) 


e Board of Charit 




Interest on School Fund in the Treas- 




ury. .... 




est paid i 


00 






lance in the Treasury. Dec 


1, is 




7 18.55 



12 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

My predecessor estimated the balance of cash in the Treasury 
at the close of the last fiscal year as one million forty-two thousand 
four hundred and fifty-six and T ^g- dollars ($1,042,456.50); the 
amount was one million one hundred and eighteen thousand eight 
hundred and ninety-two and -^-fa dollars ($1,118,892.55). 

I have no knowledge of the appropriations which will be called 
for and granted during the present session, and the above esti- 
mates are subject to many changes. I have endeavored to make 
them as close as possible, from the best data obtainable. I have 
estimated the expense of the National Guard at ninety thousand 
($90,000), a sum which I am assured by both the Adjutant- Gen- 
eral and Quartermaster-General of the State will be sufficient to 
meet the expenses of the year. The amount drawn on this ac- 
count during the past year was one hundred and nineteen thou- 
sand five hundred and twelve and -£fo dollars ($119,512.34), 
which is the full amount advanced to the military officers of the 
State, who in many cases are obliged to draw money from the 
Treasury in anticipation of their needs to meet expenses as they 
become due. For the actual expenses of the National Guard for 
the fiscal year ending November 30, 1881, I would respectfully 
refer to the annual Report of the Adjutant-General. 

For many years the amount drawn for Judicial Expenses has 
been steadily increasing, being for the fiscal year ending Novem- 
ber SO, 1880, two hundred and fifty-six thousand five hundred and 
ninety-eight and ^^ dollars ($256,598.93), the past year the 
amount was two hundred and one thousand eight hundred and 
five and -^fc dollars ($201,805.30), a decrease of nearly fifty-five 
thousand dollars ($55,000), which as a step in the right direction 
is very gratifying, and 1 trust will be followed by a still further 
reduction, although to cover any possible contingency 1 have 
thought best to estimate the expense for the present year at two 
hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars. 
Respectfully submitted, 

WHEELOCK T. BATCHELLER, 

Comptroller. 



L882 | 



I OMPTROLLER - KKI'ORI 



No. i 



i 



J8ION8 0? THI GEN EH \i ■ l\ MBL1 

l < irani each for 
Debenture of the Senate, 1881, . $7,377.00 

Debenture of the House of Representa- 
tives, 1881, . . • 79,850.00 



N. naU 




1 Grant each for 




Clinton Spencer, for Ins salary m pari 




as Clerk of the Senate, 


800.00 


Clinton Spencer, for balance of salary 




and expenses as Clerk of the 




Senate, .... 


125.00 


Clinton Spencer, for Clerical assistance, 


300. 00 


Clinton Spencer, for Office rent, 


300.00 


William A. Goodwin, for Legislative 




Statistics, .... 


62.50 


A. J. Sage, for services as Chaplain, 


150.00 


G. L. Thompson, for services as Chap- 




lain, . 


L50.00 


c B Bno, for services as Messenger, 


307.50 


D. S. Simmons, for services as Mes- 




. 


332.00 


\V. II. Kelsey, for services as Door- 




keeper, .... 


325.50 


G. S. Jeffrey, for services as Doorkeeper, 


309 00 


\V. .1. McConville, for services as Door- 




keeper, .... 


300.00 


K. 11. rVnn. for services as Reporter, . 


200.00 


(has. D. Page, " 


200.00 


W. Schlein, 


• 200. (it) 


P, M. Lovejoy, u u 


200.00 


William Seavey, " 


200.00 


J. C. Kinney, « " 


200.00 


Bern ick, for services as Door- 




keeper, .... 


L5.00 



17.00 



( 



14 



comptroller's report. 



[Jan., 



J. W. Cooley, for services as Door- 
keeper, . . . . 36.00 

L. B. Hubbard, for procuring Legisla- 
tive Documents, . . . 75.00 

Brown & Gross, for Stationery furnished 

by the Clerk, . . . 699.17 



5.786.67 



House of Representatives. 
1 Grant each for 

Horace Heath, for plan of the House 
of Representatives, 

Charles Perrin, for his salary in part as 
Clerk of the House of Represen- 
tatives, .... 

Charles P. Woodbury, for his salary as 
Assistant Clerk of the House of 
Representatives, 

Clerks of the House of Representatives, 
for Office rent and mileage, 

A. J. Sage, for services as Chaplain, 

G. L. Thompson for services as Chap- 
lain, 

William Dibble, for extra services as 
State House keeper, 

John L. White, for extra services as 
Assistant State House keeper, 

J. L. Wilson, for services as Messenger, 

Eugene Morehouse, 

A. C. Brockway, 
J. T. Wiidman, 

Geo. W. Leach, " Doorkeeper, 

James E. Smith, 

B. M. O'Brien, 
J. A. Woodward, 
E.N. Thorne, 

H. M. Farnham. " Reporter, 

Ira E. Forbes, 
Geo. D. Curtiss, 
Alex. Troupe, 

C. A. Watson, 



40.00 



500.00 



600.00 

669.00 
150.00 

150.00 

300.00 

300.00 
308.00 
325.00 
319.50 
326.00 
308.50 
314.50 
332.50 
319.50 
317.50 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 






compi 






W F Qraham, for services as Re; 200.10 

c. T. Broneon, •• 200.00 

W. A Goodwin, for Legislative Sta- 
tist .... 100.00 
B s. i Human, for extra 

in Iffioe, . . 100.00 

i: «.. Beebe penaea of Com- 

mittee on State priaon, . . L0.50 

B. W. Moore, for making out Debent 

bills, .... 

K. J. Dwyer, for rendered 

on Joint Stock Laws, 50.00 

ricee rendered to 
Oommiaaion on Joinl Stock Laws, 50.00 

in contesting 
his right to a Beat in the 1 1 
Representatives, . . lou.uu 

Clerks in the Treasury Office for paying 

lenture bills, . . . 50.00 

Charles IVrrin. for balance of his salary 
and • a aa Clerk of the House 

of I . 5J 

I> H. Buell, for account rendered, . 10.00 

d & I Iroat tionery romiehed 

by the Clerk, . 485 



Mi for 

K. P. Hatch for Stationery. 

ding 
Session of the House i 
atives, . . . . LO.OO 

K. P. Hatch, for Stationery hills, 

A 1>. V nt ran- 

. 
K P. Hatch for acconnt rendered, 
L P. Bra Uej <jer 

■ in. . 31- 






$8,811.:::. 



16 



comptroller's report. 



[Jan., 



W. J. Holland, for services as Messenger 
of Coat room, 

Henry Sedgwick, for services in care of 
Committee rooms. . 

Engrossing Committee, for accounts 
rendered, .. 

Pond & Childs, for Stationery, 

C. L. Packard, for services rendered, . 

Brown & Cross, for Stationery purchased 
by the Comptroller, 

Brown & Gross, for Connecticut Regis- 
ter and Manual of the General 
Assembly, .... 

Secretary of State for bill of engrossing, 

E. P. Hatch, for Stationery, 



No. 2. 



318.00 

310.£0 

40.00 

90.28 

3.00 

809.96 



984.00 

586.50 

76.69 



$3,662.48 
$105,487.50 



SALARIES AND EXPENSES IN EXECUTIVE OFFICES. 



DECEMBER. 

Orders in favor of 
David Torrance, for his salary as Secretary, 
T. Baker, for his salary as Treasurer, . 
S. T. Stanton, for his salary as Executive Secretary, 
R. S. Hinman, for his salary as Clerk, . 
George Williams, for his salary as Clerk, 
E. W. Moore, for his salary as Clerk, . 
Horace Heath, for his salary as Clerk, . 
E. B. L. Carter, for his salary as Clerk, 
L. B. Hubbard, for his salary as Clerk, 
P. D. Rood, for his salary as Clerk, 
R. J. Dwyer, for his salary as Clerk, 
S. T. Stanton, for expenses of Executive Department, 
David Torrance, for expenses of Secretary's Office, 
E. P. Hatch, for account rendered, 



$125.00 

100.00 

100.00 

150.00 

150.00 

150.00 

116.66 

116.66 

116.66 

60.00 

65.00 

15.95 

18.65 

15.25 






- REPORT. 



IT 



n 
C B. Andrews, for bis salary u Governor, 

1 ( Jallup. for liis -;: ;i'v a- I lieutenf nf < I 

David Torrance, for his Balary ae Secretary, 

ker, for his Balary as Treasurer, 
Chauncey Howard, for his Balary as Comptroller, 
S. T Stanton for his salary as Executive Secretary, 

Hinman, for his Balar k, . 

K. W. M his salary as ( 'li-rk. . 

F. B. Eubbard, for his Balary as Clerk, 

L. Carter, for his Balary as Clerk, 
r his Balary as < llerk, 
\l. J. Dwyer, for his Balary as Clerk, 
!•'. I> Rood, for Ins Balary as I llerk, 
Eubbard vV Robinson, for | >na1 servii 

s T. Stanton, for expenses of Executive Department, 
I». P. Nichols, for as Auditor, 

U. W. Parmer, for ser 
.1. II. Bolton & Son, for account rendered, 

Torrance, foi retary « r 

C. B. Boardman, for account render 

rBBRUABT. 

• his Balary as S uy, 

D. P. Nichols, for his salary as Treasurer, 

M. F. Tyh-r. for his salary as Executive Secretary, 
B. W. Moore, for his salary as Clerk, . 
Hinman. for his salary as Clerk. . 
L B. Eubbard, for his salary as Clerk. 
■r his salary as Clerk, 
b, for his salary as Clerk, 
Dwyer, for his salary as Clerk, 
F. D. Rood, for his salary ae 
< '. E tary's Off 

M. F. Tyler, for «xpenses of Executive Department, 
H. ■ .. Lo '-are of v. tad sfeac 

for accou 

; H. 

< '. F - for his salary as S 

D. P. Nichols, for his sala: 



Mil 

101). (Ill 

150.00 
150.00 

I 16 66 
1 16.66 
l 16.67 

25.00 

48.00 
31.50 

7.25 

125.00 

100.00 
150.00 

1 16.66 
1 16.68 

10.90 



4 



8 



18 



COMPTROLLER S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



7% 



M. F. Tyler, for his salary as 1 Ex. Secretary. . . 100.00 

E. W. Moore, for his salary as Clerk, . . . 150.00 

R. S". Hinman, for his salary as Clerk, . . . 150.00 

E. B. L. Carter, for his salary as Clerk, . _ . 116.66 
L. B. Hubbard, for his salary as Clerk, . . 116.66 
Horace Heath, for his salary as Clerk. . . . 116.67 
R. J. Dwyer, for his salary as Clerk, . . . 70.00 

F. D. Rood, for his salary as Clerk, . . . 56.00 
Mrs. R. S. Hinman, for services in Secretary's Office, . 105.00 
F. D. Rood, for extra services in Executive Office, . 25.00 
C. E. Searls, for expenses of Secretary's Office, . 16.40 
M. F. Tyler, for expenses of Executive Department, . 18.05 
Bingham & Dodd, for account rendered for Treasurer, 17.00 

APKIL. 

H. B. Bigelow, for his salary as Governor, . . 500.00 

W. H. Bulkeley, for his salary as Lieut/Governor, . 125.00 

C. E. Searls, for his salary as Secretary, . . 125.00 
W. T. Batcheller, for his salary as Comptroller, . 375.00 

D. P. Nichols, for his salary as Treasurer, . . 100.00 
M. F. Tyler, for his salary as Executive Secretary, . 100.00 
R. S. Hinman, for his salary as Clerk, . . . 150.00 

E. W. Moore, for his salary as Clerk, . . . 150.00 
George Williams, for his salary as clerk, . . 600.00 

E. B. L. Carter, for his salary as Clerk, . . 116.67 
L. B. Hubbard, for his salary as Clerk, . . 116.66 
Horace Heath, for his salary as Clerk, . . 116.67 
R. J. Dwyer, for his salary as Clerk, . . . 77.50 
Mrs. R. S. Hinman, for services in Secretary's Office, . 77.50 

F. D. Rood, for his salary as Clerk, . . . 62.00 
S. W. Barrows & Co., for account rendered, . . 54.80 
C. E. Searls, for expenses of Secretary's Office, . 25.15 
M. F. Tyler, for expenses of Executive Office, . 31.63 
Waldo, Hubbard & Hyde, for professional services, . 2,633.10 

MAY. 

C. E. Searls, for his salary as Secretary, . . 125.00 

D. P. Nichols for his salary as Treasurer, . . 100.00 
M. F. Tyler, for his salary as Executive Secretary, . 100.00 

E. W. Moore, for his salary as Clerk. . . . 150.00 
R. S. Hinman, for his salary as Clerk, . . 150.00 
L. B. Hubbard, for his salary as Clerk, . . 116.66 






COMPTROLLER S REPORT. 



L9 



K. B. L.Carter, tor his salary as Clerk, . 116 

ce Heath for hia salary as Clerk, . . 116 

!;. s. liiimiaii. i\»r services in Secretary's Office, . 
Et J. Dwyer, for Ins salary as Clerk, 

F. D. Rood, for his salary as Clerk, . . 60.00 

Ilrnrv [.Thompson, for portrait of Genera] Putnam, 10.00 
C. E, Searls, for expenses of the Secretary's Office, 
M !■' Tyler, for expenses of Executive Department, 

Henry [.Thompson, (or portrait of Gov. Bigelow, . 400.00 

Evarts Cutler, tor frame for portrail of Gk>i Bigelow, 66.00 
.it \ 

krls tor his salary as Secretary, . 125.00 

h. P. Nichols, for his salary as Treasurer, . . lun 00 

M. P. Tyler, for his salary as Executive Secretary, 100.00 

E. YY. Moore, for his salary as Clerk, . . L50.00 

Himnaii, for his salary as Clerk, . .150 00 

Horace Heath, for his salary as Clerk, . . 116 

L. B. Hubbard, for his salary as Cle . . 116 

K B, L Carter, for his salary as Clerk, 1 16 

R .1. Dwyer, for his salary as Clerk, . . 77.50 

P. D. Rood, for his salary as Clerk, . . 62.00 

Mr>. \l. s. Binman for services iii Secretary's Office, . 

T. V. Burke, for account rendered, . . 7.00 

Fale Lock Manufacturing Co., for account rendered. . 13.00 

Searls, for expenses of Secretary's Offi 17.50 

JULY. 

II. B. Bigelow, tor his salary as Governor, . . 500.00 

C. E. Searls, for his salary as Secretary, . . 125 

l>. 1'. Nichols, for his salary as Treasurer, 100.00 

\V. T. Batcheller, for his salary as Comptroller, 375.00 

M I\ Tyler, for his salary as Executive Secretary, 100.00 

R. S. lliiiman. for his salary as Clerk. . . 150.00 

K. \V. Moore, for his salary as Clerk, 150 

Williams, for his salary as Clerk, L5< 

Hor;. salary SS ( 'lerk. 1 I *i . »; T 

1 1 ibbard, for his salary as < Herk, . • 111 

K B. I. • ary as < llerk, 116 

- alary as ( 'lerk, 
1. l>. Rood, for his salary as Clerk, 

M Secreti 



20 



COMPTROLLER S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



E. P. Hatch, for account rendered, 

C. E. Searls, for expenses of Secretary's Office, 

AUGUST. 

W. H. Bulkeley, for his salary as Lieut. -.Governor, 

C. E. Searls, for his salary as Secretary, 

D. P. Nichols, for his salary as Treasurer, 

M. F. Tyler, for his salary as Executive Secretary, 
R. S. Hinman, for his salary as Clerk, 

E. W. Moore, for his salary as Clerk, 
L. B. Hubbard, for his salary as Clerk, 
E. B. L. Carter, for his salary as Clerk, 
Horace Heath, {or his salary as Clerk, 
P. D. Rood, for his salary as Clerk, 

R. J. Dwyer, for his salary as Clerk, 
C. E. Searls, for expenses of Secretary's Office, 
Pond & Childs, for account rendered, . 
Bingham & Dodd, for account rendered, 

SEPTEMBER. 

C. E. Searls for his salary as Secretary, 

D. P. Nichols for his salary as Treasurer, 

M. F. Tyler, for his salary as Executive Secretary, 

E. W. Moore, for his salary as Clerk, . 
Geo. Williams, for his salary as Clerk, 
R. S. Hinman, for his salary as Clerk, 
L. B. Hubbard, for his salary as Clerk, 

E. B. L. Carter, for his salary as Clerk, 
Horace Heath, for his salary as Clerk, 

F. D. Rood, for his salary as Clerk, 
R. J. Dwyer, for his salary as Clerk, 

C. E. Searls, for expenses of Secretary's Office, 

M. F. Tyler, for expenses of Executive Department, 

Kellogg & Bulkeley Co., for account rendered, 

OCTOBER. 

H. B. Bigelow, for his salary as Governor, 

C. E. Searls for his salary as Secretary, 

D. P. Nichols, for his salary as Treasurer, 

M. F. Tyler, for his salary as Executive Secretary, 

E. "W. Moore, for his salary as Clerk, . 
R. S. Hinman, for his salary as Clerk, . 
Geo. Williams, for his salary as Clerk, 



5.00 


15.30 


125.00 


125.00 


100,00 


100.00 


150.00 


150.00 


116.66 


116.67 


116.67 


62.00 


77.50 


12.65 


8.25 


18.00 


125.00 


100.00 


100.00 


150.00 


300.00 


150.00 


116.66 


116.66 


116.67 


62.00 


77.50 


36.20 


79.91 


6.00 


500.00 


125.00 


100.00 


100.00 


. • 150.00 


150.00 


150.00 



L882.] 



COMPTROLLER - REPOK'I . 



1, B, Bubbard, for ins salaj rk, 

.• Heath, for bii -alary a> < 'fork, 

K. B 1. Carter, for his salary as Clerk, 

d, for his -alary as Clerk, 
EL .1. Dwyer, for his salary as Clerk, 
s \V. Barrows & i account rendered, 

iris, for expen 
If. F. Tyler, for expenses of Executive Department 

. 1MBKK. 

K. Searls, for his salary i try, 

T. Nichols, for his salary as Treasurer. 
T. Batcheller, for his salary as Comptrolh-r. 
F. Tyler, for his salary as execul -ary. 

W lio >re, for his Balary as Clerk. . 

S. Hininan. for his salary OS Clerk, 

B. Bubbard, for his salary as Clerk, 

Borace Heath, for his salary as Clerk, 

I-'.. B. L. Carter, for his salary as Clerk. 

F. D. Rood, for his salary as Clerk, 
R. J. Dwyer, for his salary as Clerk, . 

C. E. Searls, for expenses of Secretary's Oflft 
Hubbard. Hyde & Gross, for professional services 
K. W. Moore, for expenses of the ComptrolL 

D. P. \ s, for expenses of the Treasurer's < >!': 



C. 

D. 

W 

M. 

E 

R. 

L 



21 

i i 'j 73 

in. i. in. 

LOO '».. 

150 00 
1 L6.74 
1 L6.67 
1 L6.6? 

77.50 

•_' [ 5 I 
]..... mi 
221.89 






$24,880.70 



No. 3. 



Jl DICIAL El 

. I ). Park, < 'hief .lu-i_ ipreme 

. | 
1,01 
Dwig 1,00 

• _'••: . . 1,00 



22 



comptroller's REPOFT. 



[Jan.. 



Edward I. Sanford, Judge of Superior 

Court, 
Roland Hitchcock, . 
Earl Martin, 
Sidney B. Beardsley, 
Moses Culver, 
James A. Hovey, . 
David S. Calhoun, Judge of Court of Com 

mon Pleas for Hartford County, 
Lynde Harrison, Judge of Court of Com 

mon Pleas for New Haven County, 
David Torrance, Judge of Court of Com 

mon Pleas for New Haven County, 
J. P C. Mather, Judge of Court of Com 

Pleas for New London County, 
Frederick B. Hall, Judge of Court of Com 

mon Pleas for Fairfield County, 
F. D. Fyler, Judge of t Litchfield District 

Court, 
Donald J. Warner, Judge of Litchfield 

District Court, 
George H. Co well, Judge of Waterbury 

District Court, 



3,999.96 
3,666.67 
4,000.00 
3,999.96 
4,333.31 
4,000.00 

2,666.66 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

2,499.96 

2,666.64 

1,333.28 

500.00 

500.00 



$57,166.40 



Salaries of States Attorneys 

Orders in favor of 

William Hamersley, Attorney for Hart- 
ford County, .... 

T. E. Doolittle, Attorney for New Haven 
County, .... 

T. M. Waller, Attorney for New London 
County, . ... 

James Huntington, Attorney for Litch- 
field County, .... 

Samuel Fessenden, Attorney for Fairfield 
County, .... 

John J. Penrose, Attorney for Windham 
County, . . , . 



2,500.00 



2,750.00 
2,000.00 
1,400.00 
2,750.00 
700.00 



M PTR01 i 

W. V Wiil. ox, Attorney for Middle* 

nnty, ... 

B 11. Bill, A.I n.l Corn 700.00 

| n 20 

- in favor 

r, - 2,7< 

BABTfORD 001 WT1 

• '. W. Johnson, Clerk, for 202 
Bill . 5,11*3 

W. Johl rk, for 

2,334.00 
W. John rk, for 

Sheriff and Disbor 
ments, .... 1,956.32 

:; ( >•■ I \V. Johnson, < Stark, for 

omitment of girls to the Lndastrial 

121.18 
1 Order by C. W. Johnson. Clerk, for 

Debenture of Jury Comm -. . 10.00 

1 ( totler by Francis « tant 

; Bills of Cost, . . 1,991.79 

- by Francis Chambers .nt 

rk for Balance . >f Jury I >.- 1.72 

l < trder by I ibers, Assistant 

rk, for attendance of Sheriff and 

; "7 
l Order by Francis Chambers, Assistanl 
rk, for Commitment of girla 
[ndnstrial School . . . l LOO 



$ 1 2, 1 



mm ii' my 

by A. I). < ul.orne. Clrrk. for 6 
Bills of Cost, . . 21,77 

A. I>. Osb 

i . i ■• 
12 A l>. < tol i 

Sheriff an 

« 



24 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

1 Order by A. D. Osborne, Clerk, for 

Debenture of Jury Commissioners, . 40.00 

2 Orders by T. E. Doolittle, State Attorney, 

for services rendered by Pinkerton's 

Detective Agency, . . . . 467.10 



$30,077.69 



NEW LONDON COUNTY. 

5 Orders by Webster Park, Clerk, for 162 

Bills of Cost, .... 

6 Orders by Webster Park, Clerk, for 

Balance of Jury Debenture, . 

1 Order by J. C. Averill, Clerk for 69 

Bills of Cost, .... 

2 Orders by J. C. Averill, Clerk, for Bal- 

ance of Jury Debenture, 
2 Orders by J. C. Averill, Clerk, for at- 
tendance of Sheriff and Disburse- 
ments, .... 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 

4 Orders by H. T. Blake, Clerk, for 404 

Bills of Cost, .... 16,832.01 

8 Orders by H. T. Blake, Clerk, for Bal- 

ance of Jury Debenture, . . 4,804.80 

9 Orders by H. T. Blake, Clerk, for at- 

tendance of Sheriff and Disburse- 
ments, .... 2,200.16 

1 Order by H. T. Blake, Clerk, for De- 
benture of Jury Commissioners, . 40.00 

3 Orders by Samuel Fessenden, State At- 
torney, for services by Pinkerton's De- 
tective Agency, . . . 1,172.21 



WINDHAM COUNTY. 

4 Orders by E. L. Cundall, Clerk, for 109 

Bills of Cost, .... 3,436.93 

4 Orders by E. L. Cundall, Clerk, for Bal- 
ance of Jury Debenture, . . 1,704.02 



8,097.02 




1,766.92 




2,189.39 




825.16 




524.70 






$13,403.19 



5,049.18 



188-.] OOMPTROLJ I R*8 1:1 PORT. 

4 Orders by K. L, CundalL. Clerk, for 

tendance of Sherifl and D 

ments, .... i,'»v. 

l Order by E. L Cundall, clerk, for De 

benture of Jury ( Jon . 10.00 



58.13 



LITOHFTBLD 001 N I v. 

2 Orders by W. L. Ransom, Clerk, for 

152 Bills of C . . . 8,931.64 

4 Orders l>y \V. L. Ransom. Clerk, for 

ince of Jury Debenture, . . 1,337.35 

5 Orders by W. L. Ransom, Clerk, for 

endance of Sheriff and Disburse- 
iiu: .... 483.82 

1 Order by W. L. Ransom, Clerk, for 

enture of Jury Commissioners, 10.00 



MII>DI.KSK\ OOUNTY. 

4 Orders by C. G. R. Vinal. Clerk, for 
90 Bills of C 

6 Orders by C. G. R. Vinal, Clerk, for 
Balance of Jury Debenture 
lers by C. O. 1 L Vinal, Clerk, for 
attendance of Sheriff and Disburse- 
ments, .... 

1 Order I R. Vinal. Clerk, for 

Debenture of Jury Commissioners, . 



TOLLAND 001 NT v. 

5 Orders by K. 0. Dimock, Clerk, for 77 

Bills of Cost. . 2,913.76 

•piers by E. 0. Dimock, Clerk, I 

1,471.10 
k. tor 
• attendance of Sheriff and ! 

7 : 
frder by K. 0. I Clerk, I 

Debenture of Ji. 10.00 



i 







7!)-.' 


81 


3,120.83 








1,494.10 








814.46 








10.00 















I 



26 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, HARTFORD COUNTY. 



3 Orders by C. E. Fellowes, Clerk, for 

Balance of Jury Debenture, . . 1,462.58 

10 Orders by C. E. Fellowes, Clerk, for 
attendance of Sheriff and Disburse- 
^ N ments, . . . 1,775.33 



COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 

1 Order by John S. Fowler, Clerk, for 2 

Bills of Cost, .... 135.25 

3 Orders by John S. Fowler, Clerk, for 

Balance of Jury Debenture, . * . 1,710.48 

6 Orders by John S. Fowler, Clerk, for 
attendance of Sheriff and Disburse- 
ments. .... 3,682.75 



1,237.91 



$5,528.48 

COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, NEW LONDON COUNTY. 

3 Orders by C. W. Butler, Clerk, for 

Balance of Jury Debenture, . . 1,702.78 

2 Orders by C. W. Butler, Clerk, for 
attendance of Sheriff and Disburse- 
ments, .... 932.53 

$2,635.31 

COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 

5 Orders by W. E. Norton, Clerk, for 

Balance of Jury Debenture, . . 2,597.94 

10 Orders by W. E. Norton, Clerk, for 
attendance of Sheriff and Disburse- 
ments, .... 2.123.81 



t,721.75 



LITCHFIELD DISTRICT COURT. 



2 Orders by W. F. Hurlbut, Clerk, for 

4 Bills of Cost, . . . 148.80 

3 Orders by W. F. Hurlbut, Clerk, for 

Balance of Jury Debenture, . - . 552.53 



L882.] 27 

9 Oiden by W. B\ Burlbut, Clerk, for 
adance of Sherifl and Disbui 
menta, .... 

I • 1-: F 1 1 n MOT i\ a\ ULfi 01 

May i;. Vinal, Clerk oi Middles 

Superior < Jourt, for Balance due 
him, .... $192.00 

July. C. W. Johnson, Clerk oi Bartford 

Su] i art, U>r Balance due 

liim. . . . . U6 

II. T. Blake, Clerk oi Fairfield Su- 
perior Court, for Balance due 
him, .... 

W. L Ransom, < Jlerk of Litchfield 
Superior < lourt, for Balance d 
him, .... 218.12 



$1,62 



$201,£ 



No. 4. 

BOARD OF PRISONERS IX COUNTY JAILS. 
HABTFOBD OOUHTT. 

W. Johnson, Clerk, for 
Board . . . $10,819 

NK.V UAVKN 001 NTV. 

by A. I). I rk, for 

B era, . 

VI V. 

r Park, Clerk, far 

. 

. I rk, tor 

Bo an, . . . 



28 comptroller's report. [Jan., 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 



4 Orders by H. T. Blake, Clerk, for Board 

of Prisoners, .... $7,556.85 

4 Orders by H. T. Blake, Clerk, for Board 

of Prisoners in Danbury, . . 1,749.11 



$9,305.96 



WINDHAM COUNTY. 



4 Orders by E. L. Cundall, Clerk, for 

Board of Prisoners, . . . , 1,081.58 



LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 



2 Orders by W. L. Ransom, Clerk, for 

Board of Prisoners, . . . 3,063.21 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



4 Orders by C. G. R. Vinal, Clerk, for 

Board of Prisoners, . . . 2,641.32 



TOLLAND COUNTY. 



4 Orders by E. 0. Dimock, Clerk, for Board 

of Prisoners, .... 780.21 



$57,417.42 



No. 5. 

STATE HOUSE. 
DECEMBER. 

Orders in favor 
William Dibble, for monthly pay roll, . $1,114.34 
William Dibble, for expenses as State 

House Keeper, . . . 90.28 

William Dibble, for additional pay roll, . 47.83 

Hartford City Gas Light Co., for account 

rendered, .... 477.85 

H. J. Chaffee, for account rendered. . 197.19 

Smith & Egge, Manufacturing Co., for ac- 
count rendered, . . . 150.00 



1 B82. | >LLER'e REPORT. 

8 i 

Geor ml rendei 1 1 
I i ml rend< 

1. for rent of room, 
Holcomb & Sperr] ount rendered, . 91.10 
Works, for account ren- 
dered, ..... 129 
I Brook Ice Co.. for account rendered, 363.20 
K. i >. Brittenbring, for account rendered, . 20.64 
William Angos, for account rendered, . 197.15 

JAMAKY. 

William Dibble, for monthly pay roll, . 1,112.92 
nm Dibble, for expenses a> State 
Bouse Keeper, . . . 143.17 

W. U Whittemore, for account rendered, . .'Jl.OO 

S. M i or account rendered, >.40 

Walworth Mfg. Co., for account rendered, r> 

Cha: ier, for account rendered, . !••';. 00 

Seidler& May. for account rendered, 343.50 

n & Butler, for account rendered, . 91.08 

Thomas J. Blake, for account rendered, 7.00 

am Boiler Ins. Co., for ac- 
count rendered, . . . 40.1 
Archer Pancoast Manufacturing Co., for 

account rendered, . 350.00 

John S. Hussey. for accou] ed, . 68.1 1 

3 ball, for account rendered for care 
of cloc .... 150 00 

El T for account n * 06 

Id & Co., for account rende 
m 

William Dibble, for monthly pay roll. L. 107. 76 

B( use Keeper, . L28 

<r accoun 1. 17 

l Bmblei i * 

M A 

William Dibble, for mont] roll, 1,01 

William Dibble, 
Eouse See] 



a^ ; 



4 






30 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

Hartford City Gas Light Co., for Building, 597.60 

Hartford City Gas Light Co., for grounds, 89.06 

Geo. M. Way & Co., for account rendered, 99.62 

P. & P. Corbin, for account rendered, . ,15.75 
Connecticut Telephone Co., for account 

rendered, .... 45.48 

APRIL. 

William Dibble, for monthly pay roll, . 1,097.50 
William Dibble, for expenses as State 

House Keeper, . . . 34.15 

Spring Brook Ice Co., for account rendered, 73.83 

David Blevins & Co., for account rendered, 100.00 

E. Taylor & Son, for account rendered, • 27.94 
McNary & Co., for account rendered, . 26.00 
Connecticut Telephone Co., for account 

rendered, . . . . 50.00 

P. Barnard & Co,, for account rendered, . 18.00 

A. A. Hunt, for account rendered for coal, 472.15 

MAY. 

Henry I. Hayden, for account rendered for 

flags, ..... 70.00 

William Dibble, for monthly pay roll, . 1,064.51 

William Dibble, for expenses as State 

House Keeper, . . . 60.00 

Hartford and Spring Brook Ice Co., for ac- 
count rendered, . . . 16.67 

Hartford Water Works, for account ren- 
dered, .... 205.50 

George M. Way & Co., for account rendered, 24.40 

Seidler & May, for account rendered, . 165.00 

JUNE. 

William Dibble, for monthly pay roll, . 1,006.72 
William Dibble, for Labor on Capitol 

grounds, . . '. 163.11 

William Dibble, for expenses as State 

House Keeper, . . . 47.15 

Hartford and Spring Brook Ice Co., for 

account rendered, . . . 16.67 

F. T. Ellithorpe, for safety air cushion for 

Elevator, .... 514.90 






1882.] COMPTB I 

J. \\ lered, . 21.1 

M. Wav 

. 

T. S 

William Urals, for account I 

l.Y. 

m Dibble, tor monthl; '.. 1.1: 

Dibble, 

II ;>er, . 38. 

Hertford and 

ml render ... 1 6.1 

A 1>. Voi inr rend 

B - any, for account rende 22. f 

or Pane v.ifacturing Co., for 

int rend. . . . 16.! 

Com ;»hone Co., for account 

rendered, .... 50.00 

ham Dibl tie, for monthly pay roll, 1,112.81 

William ensea a- 

H per, . . . 13.62 

- i, for accouir i. . 13.20 

Hartford and Spring Brook Ice Co., for 

account rendered, . . 16.1 

John N. :'or account rendered, . 1.75 

W. II Poet & Co.j for account rendered, . 52.45 

J. < '. Britton. for account render '.00 

Geo. W. for account rendered for 

coal. .1.17 

8EPTKMHKK. 

William for monthly pay roll, 1.1' 

William Dibble, for • 

Ho ... 

; for account r 

. 

account 



< 
i 



V 



32 



comptroller's report. 



[Jan.. 



at 



l4 



Smith & Egge Manufacturing Co., for ac- 
count rendered, . . . 30.04 
William Brabazon, for account rendered, . 194.47 

OCTOBER. 

William Dibble, for monthly pay roll, . 1,083 58 
William Dibble, for expenses as State 

House Keeper, . . . 12.73 
Hartford and Spring Brook Ice Co., for 

account rendered, . . . 16.66 

E. Taylor & Son., for account rendered, . 46.12 

E. P. Hatch, for account rendered, . 8.00 

A. H. Embler & Co., for account rendered, 63.69 

Strickland & Shea, for account rendered, . 10.21 

Conn. Telephone Co., for account rendered, 50.00 

NOVEMBER. 

William Dibble, for monthly pay-roll, . 1,111.34 
Wm. Dibble, for expenses as State House 

Keeper, .... 82.99 
Hartford Water Works, for act. rendered, 251.50 
Hartford & Spring Brook Ice Co., for ac- 
count rendered, . . . 16.67 
Geo. M. Way & Co., for account rendered, 81.14 
E. Taylor & Son, for account rendered, . 42.27 
William Angus, for account rendered, labor 

on dome, % 601.45 



$28,009.76 



No. 6. 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 
JANUARY. 

Grants in favor of 
C. L. Avery for appropriation for Groton 

Centennial Celebration Committee, . $3,000.00 

MARCH. 

E. J. Johnson, for extra services as State 

House Keeper, . . . 150.00 



1882.] KFTROU ia'fl rkpost. 

APRIL. 

.1 If . Hatheway, amou led by Judge 

.1. I) Park, .... 9,850.00 
J, I). Park. : 08 as Committee in 

tj claim, . . . 367 00 

II s. Iferwin for horses detained inquar- 

ine, .... 275.00 

for qoti oed in 

quarantine, .... 25.00 

vernor, for Cowjm 
Dtennial Committe . . '-'.")<>. 00 

Peter <>r Bounty due him. . . 20.00 

KB. 
Orders in favor of 
Electors of President and Vice-Preside IJ.'j.OO 

Aaron Sanford, for account rendered, 

I. Thompson, for portrait of J. 
Trumbull. 2d, .... 325.00 

itler, for frame for portrait of J. 
Trumbull. '2d, .... G7.50 

R. S. Hinman. fur expenses in delivering 
portrait of J. Trumbull, 2d, in Wash- 
ington, D. C, . . . 40.70 

JANUARY. 

W. II. Heath, for account rendered, . 5.00 

D. P. Nichols, for services as auditor of 

itol Commissioners' accou: . 8.00 

R. W. Farmer, for services as auditor of 
Capitol Commissioners' accou i. 

MAI. 

J. C. Byxbee, Sheriff, for returning votes I 1 

O. D. Seymour, Sheriff, for in spe- 

cial election of State Senator, . 10.00 

APRIL. 

for professional 
so: dm, 507 

C. R. Chapman, for professional services in 

22 
President and Fellows of Yale College, for 

furnishing Standard Tim.'. 11" 



( 



34 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

JULY. 

President and Fellows of Yale College, 'for 
at furnishing Standard Time, . . 500.00 






J. B. Corning et al, for services as Apprais- 
ers, 15.00 



kU OCTOBER. 

'T President and Fellows of Yale College, for 

i&p furnishing Standard time, . . 500.00 

NOVEMBER. 

J. C. Byxbee, Sheriff, for Returning votes, 7.20 

J. I. Hutchinson, Sheriff, for Returning votes, 4.00 

Frank Hawkins, Sheriff, for Returning votes, 10.60 

C. H. Osgood, Sheriff, for Returning votes, 11.20 



$16,288.48 



No. 7. 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



DECEMBER. 

Orders in favor of 

B. G. Northrop, for his salary as Secretary, $250.00 

J. G. Baird, for his salary as Clerk, . 150.00 

B. G. Northrop, for office expenses, . 42.00 

JANUARY. 

B. G. Northrop, for his salary as Secretary, 250.00 

J. G. Baird, for his salary as Clerk, . 150.00 

Giles Potter, Agt., for services and expenses, 408.29 

Seidler & May, for furniture, . . 809.00 

FEBRUARY. 

B. G. Northrop, for his salary and expenses 

as Secretary, . . . . 375.00 

J. G. Baird, for his salary as Clerk, . 150.00 

Talcott & Post, for carpets for office, . 305.38 

MARCH. 

B. G. Northrop, for his salary as Secretary, 250.00 

J. G. Baird, for his salary as Clerk, . 150.09 

Giles Potter, for services and expenses as 

Agent, .... 530.07 



1SSJ. ] comptroller's &RPOBT. 

M 1 1 . 

B. G. N rthrop, for his salary ami expen 

as Secretary, ».00 

rd, for his salary as Cle . 1 ."><). 00 

Northrop, for office rxpi'iises. . 17."). 70 

JINK. 

Northrop, for Institu . . 500.00 

B. G. Northrop, for his salary as Secretary, -J.")!). in) 

r Ins salary as Clerk, . L 50.00 

JULY. 

B. G. Northrop, for his salary ami expenses 

Secretary, .... .".7.">.oo 
J. G. Baird, for his salary as C'lork, . 150.00 

and expenses as 
Agent. .... 403. 1 :i 

AUGUST. 

B. G. Northrop, for his salary as Secretary, 250.00 

Baird, for his salary as Clerk, . 150.00 

: EMBER. 

B. G. Northrop, for Institutes, . . 500.00 

B. G. Northrop, for his salary as Secretary, 250.00 

J. G. Baird, for his salary as Clerk, . 150.00 

OCTOBER. 

B. G. Northrop, for Institutes, • . 1,000.00 

B. I K N"rthrop, for his salary and expenses 

as Secretary, . . . :: 7.7.00 

d, for his salary as Clerk, . 150.00 
and expense - 

A - . . . .104 

EMBBB. 

B. «.. Northrop, for Institw . . 1,000.00 

B. G-. Northrop, for his Balai - 250 (| «» 

1 12 
.1. <;. Baird, for his salary as Chrk. 150.00 

si 1,221 21 



fej? 



[Jan., 



at 



±5. G. NOTth 

in part, 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 
JANUARY. 

Orders in favor of 

B. G. Northrop, for annual appropriation 

in part, .... $2,200.00 

FEBRUARY. 

B. G. Northrop, for annual appropriation 

500.00 

MARCH. 

B. G. Northrop, for annual appropriation 

in part, .... 3,000.00 

JUNE. 

B. G. Northrop, for annual appropriation 

in part, .... 2,500.00 

JULY. 

B. G. Northrop, for annual appropriation 

in part, . . . . 600.00 

B. G. Northrop, for annual appropriation 

in part, . . . 700.00 

OCTOBER 

B. G. Northrop, for annual appropriation 

in part, . . . . 1,000.00 

NOVEMBER. 

B. G. Northrop, for annual appropriation 

in part, .... 800.00 

~ $11,300.00 



JULY. 

Commissioners for Building State Normal School, 15,000.00 

$26,300.00 



No. 9. 

COMMON SCHOOLS. 



DECEMBER. 

3 Orders, for J. G. Baird, for School Li- 
braries, .... $1,130.00 

JANUARY. 

2 Orders, for J. G. Baird, for School Li- 
braries, .... 485.00 






L882.] KFT80LL] i:i. 

FKBBl ai;t. 

l Order, for J, G. Baird, for School L 

br;r .... L35.00 

MAI. 

•_' Orders, for J. (i. 1- School Li- 

bra' .... 320.00 

APRIL. 

3 Orders, for .1. (J. Baird, for School Li- 
bra- .... i.00 

MAY. 

1 Order, for .1. ti. Baird, for School Li- 
bra: .... .00 
.uxK. 

1 Order, f<>r J. G. Baird, for School Li- 
bra- .... IT."). 00 
JULY. 

1 Order, for J. G. Baird, for School Li- 
bra; .... G0.00 

i KMHHR. 

1 Order, for J. G. Baird, for School Li- 
bra- .... 150.00 

HER. 

1 Order, for J. G. Baird, for School Li- 

braries, . . . . '.00 

NOVEMBER. 

2 Orden, for J. G. Baird. for School Li- 

braries, .... 310.i"i 



155.00 



* Appi -?s. 

mai:« h. Onl.-rs for Sundry Ti 

APRIL. « I - ..ns. '7 50 

mat, Orden for Sundry '; 1,557.00 

a for Sundry T - 50 

B*PT. Orders for Sundry Towns, D.00 



215,2 





•TI 

»] Knnil ami ibi - 

■ 



38 



COMPTROLLER'S REPORT. 



[Jan., 






at : 



iQft 



No. 10. 

STATE LIBRARY. 
JANUARY. 

Orders in favor of 
C. J. Hoadly, for his salary as Librarian, $450.00 
C. J. Hoadly, for expenses as Librarian, 218.62 

APRIL. 

C. J. Hoadly, for bis salary as Librarian, 450.00 

MAY. 

C. J. Hoadly, for expenses as Librarian, 195.05 

JUNE. 

C. J. Hoadly, for expenses as Librarian, 177.36 

JULY. 

C. J. Hoadly, for his salary as Librarian, 450.00 

SEPTEMBER. 

C. J. Hoadly, for expenses as Librarian, 133.87 

OCTOBER. 

C. J. Hoadly, for his salary as Librarian, 450.00 

NOVEMBER. 

C. J. Hoadly, for expenses of State Li- 
brary, ..... 163.33 

C. J. Hoadly, for expenses of State Li- 
brary, ..... 144.64 

C. J. Hoadly, for Colonial Records, . 1,400.00 

C. J. Hoadly, for appropriation by the 

General Assembly of 1880, . . 2,000.00 



$6,232. 






No. 11. 

STATE PRISON. 
DECEMBER. 

Orders in favor of 

Augustus Sargent, Warden, for deficiency 

in earnings, .... 

George S. Clark, for services as Appraiser, 

David Greenslit, for services as Appraiser, 



$1,548.23 
50.00 
50.00 



1882.] OOMPTROLLEB'fl BEPOBT. B9 

JANTAKT. 

Connecticut Prison .\ m, for quar- 

terly appropriation, . • . 300.00 

. K. Shipman, for quarterly appropri- 

ii. . . . . . i. 

ifl Whitmore, for his salary ;is Director, I 00.00 

D P. Nichols, for services as Auditor, . 16.no 

EL W. Parmer, for services as Auditor, . 10.50 

KABGH. 

II. T. Sperry, for expenses of himself and 

others as Directors, . . . 86.75 

J. II. Leeds, foT expenses as Director, . 25.85 

GK \Y. Avery, M.I>.. for medical examina- 
tions, ..... 5.00 

APRIL. 

Connecticut Prison Association, for quar- 
terly appropriation, . . . 500.00 
Mary E. Shipman, for quarterly appropria- 
tion, ..... 43.50 
I istus Sargent, Warden, for appropria- 
tion for Library, . . . 200.00 
Augustus Sargent, Warden, for income 

from Dorsey Fund, . . . 100.00 

Augustus Sargent, W 7 arden, for appropria- 
tion of 1881, .... 2,000.00 
JULY. 
Connecticut Prison Association, for quar- 

.y appropriation, . . . 500.00 

- Sargent, Warden, for deficiency 
in earnings, .... 3,000.00 
Lewis "Whitmore, for his salary as Di- 

•or, .... 100. oo 

AUG1 

man, for quarterly appropria- 
tion, ..... 

BEPTKMBJ 

II. T 

rectors, . . . . 84 

Augustus Sargent, Warden, for deficiency 

in earnings, .... 1,500.00 



i 



at 









40 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

OCTOBER. 

Connecticut Prison Association, for quar- 
terly appropriation, . . . 500.00 

Mary E. Shipruan, for quarterly appropria 

tion, ..... 43.50 



$10,850.68 



No. 12. 

STATE REFORM SCHOOL. 



JANUARY. 

Orders in favor of 
C. L. Upham, Treasurer, for appropriation 

of 1880 in part, . . . $5,000.00 

JUNE. 

C. L. Upham, Treasurer, for appropriation 

of 1881 in part, . . . 5,000.00 

OCTOBER. 

C. L. Upham, Treasurer, for appropriation 

of 1881 in part, . . . 7,000.00 

OCTOBER. 

C. L. Upham, Treasurer, for appropriation 

of 1881 in part, . . . 1,500.00 



$18,500.00 



DECEMBER. 

J. L. Houston, for expenses as Trustee, . $10.80 

F. O. Bennett, for expenses as Trustee, . 27.00 

JANUARY. 

C. L. Upham, Treasurer, for board bill, . 7,861.16 

Vincent Colyer, for expenses as Trustee, . 73.00 

G-. H. Preston, for expenses as Trustee, . 60.00 

J. L. Lathrop, for expenses as Trustee, . 46.75 

Charles Fabrique, for expenses as Trustee, 8.00 

APRIL. 

C. L. Upham, Treasurer, for board bill, . 7,951.72 

Theodore Bird, for expenses as Trustee, . 27.00 



1882.] COMPTi; BEPOBT. 41 

JULY. 

L [Tpham, Treasurer nl bill, . 8,1 11.94 

•raid, for expenses as Trnsti 100.00 

C. I.. [Jpham, I srd bill. . H.r.90.81 

^.18 



168.18 



■t 



No. 13. 

HBOTEOUT ENDUBTBIAL BOHOOL FOB QIBLS. 

Orders in favor of 

ling, Treasurer, for board 

bill to 1». . . . $2.1."T 

Charles F. Browning. Tn asurer, for board 

bill to Janu; ; . . . 2,188.11 

Charh-s F. Browning. Treasurer, for board 

bill to Feb™. . 2,186.38 

Charles F. Browning. Treasurer, for board 

bill to Mare':. . . . 2,031.86 

Charles F. Browning, Treasurer, for board 

bill to April, .... 2,299.16 
Charles F. Browning, Treasurer, for board 

bii: .... 2.243.20 

Charles F. Browning, Treasurer, for board 

bill to June, .... 2.348.01 
Charles F. Browning. Treasurer, for board 

bill to July, . . 2 

Charles F. Browning. r, for board 

bill to A . 2,31 

Charles F. Browni r, for board 

bill I iber, . .2,401 

r, for board 

bill to Octo! . . . 2,354.67 

jes F. Bl rd 

bill | ... 2,437.21 

appro- 
priation, passed January Session, 1881, 18,500.00 

6 $: 



42 



COMPTROLLER'S REPORT. 



[Jan. 



at 



%. 



No. 14. 

STATE PAUPERS. 
JANUARY. 

Orders in favor of 
M. H. Sanford, for supporting State pau 
pers, .... 

FEBRUARY. 

M. H. Sanford, for supporting State pau 
pers, .... 

MAY. 

M. H. Sanford, for supporting State pau 
pers, .... 

JUNE.' 

M. H. Sanford, for supporting State pan 
*pers, .... 

AUGUST. 

M. H. Sanford, for supporting State pau 
pers, .... 

OCTOBER. 

M. B. Sanford, for supporting State pau 
pers, .... 



$300.00 



1,367.20 



250.00 



100.00 



1,759.20 



100.00 



$3,876.40 



No. 15. 

HUMANE INSTITUTIONS. 

Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb. 



APRIL. 



1 Order for annual appropriation in part, . $4,375.00 

AUGUST. 

1 Order for annual appropriation in part, . 4,406.63 



$8,781.63 



Perkins Institute for the Blind. 

AUGUST. 

1 Order for annual appropriation in part, . 



$3,775.00 






1SS:!. ] KPTSOLLKl'fl UPOBT. 1 I 

JA\ 

.nual appropriation in part, . si.:.; 

ATKIl.. 

1 Older for annual appropriation in part, . 1,594.60 

JII.Y. 

1 Order for annual appropriation in part, . 1,011.66 

BEB. 

1 ( )rdor for annual appropriation in part, . 

irral Hospital Society. 

JANUARY. 

1 Order for annual appropriation in part, . $1,250.00 

APRIL. 

1 Order for annual appropriation in part, . 1,250.00 

JULY. 

1 Order for annual appropriation in part, . 1,250.00 

OCTOBER. 

1 Order for annual appropriation in part, . 1,250.00 

00.00 

Hartford Hospital. 

JANUARY. 

1 Order for annual appropriation in part, . $1,250.00 

APRIL. 

1 ( >r<ler for annual appropriation in part, . 1,250.00 

JULY. 

1 Order for annual appropriation in part, . 1,250. on 

NOVEMBER. 

1 Order for annual appropriation in part, . [,250.00 

$5,000 

Conner* fc>/t Hospital for t),- 

• lers in favor of 
Iff. I». Copeland, Treasurer, for board bill, 

. $4,241 
M. B. Copeland, Treasurer, for hoard bill, 

January. 



i 



"i 






44 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

M. B. Copeland, Treasurer, for board bill, 

February, .... 4,459.71 

M. B Copeland, Treasurer, for board bill, 

March, .... 4,120.07 

M. B. Copeland, Treasurer, for board bill, 

April, ..... 4,582.87 

M. B. Copeland, Treasurer, for board bill, 

May, ..... 4,477.43 

M. B. Copeland, Treasurer, for board bill, 

June, ..... 4,574.16 

M. B. Copeland, Treasurer, for board bill, 

July, ..... 4,393.37 

M. B. Copeland, Treasurer, for board bill, 

August, .... 4,591.23 

M. B. Copeland, Treasurer, for board bill, 

September, .... 5,277.07 

M. B. Copeland, Treasurer, for board bill, 

October, .... 5,334.66 

M. B. Copeland, Treasurer, for board bill, 

November, . . . .5,574.94 

R. S. Fellowes, for expenses as Trustee, . 14.40 

S. G. Willard, for expenses as Trustee, . 22.06 

E. P. Bennett, for expenses as Trustee, . 21.96 

R. M. Bullock, for expenses as Trustee, . 38.55 

H. S. Hayden, for expenses as Trustee, . 73.75 

A. W. Barrows, for Medical examinations, 7.75 

M. B. Copeland, Treasurer, for appropria- 
tion in part, under Resolution 194, 
1881, ..... 5,000.00 



$61,176.86 

Appropriation for Additional Building for Connecticut Hospital for 

the Insane. 

DECEMBER. 

Orders in favor of the Commissioners. 

1 Order for appropriation in part, . $8,149.29 

JANUARY. 

2 Orders for appropriation in part, . 5,725.24 

FEBRUARY. 

2 Orders for appropriation in part, . 9,865.71 

MARCH. 

1 Order for appropriation in part, . 5,489.56 



1882.] comptroller's report. 



ml. 
2 ( trdera for appropriation in part, 

2 Orders for appropriation in part, 

J INK. 

3 < trden for appropriation in part. 

JULY. 

rdera for appropriation in part, 

RUBER. 

1 Order for appropriation in part, 



14.07 
10.050.70 



17,122.32 



136.26 



* 



$68,267.04 



Retreat for the Insane. 

1 Order for board bill, January, . . $1,235.69 

1 Order for board bill, April, . . 864.82 

I Order for board bill, July, . . 876.31 

1 Order for board bill, October, . . 707.12 



t)7it Asylum for the Insane. 

1 Order for board bill, January, . . $260.00 

1 Order for board bill, April, . . 260.00 

1 Order for board bill, July, . . 2.")0.00 

1 Order for board bill, October, . 226.00 

Bu > the Insam . 

1 Order for board bill, January, . 

1 Order for board bill, April, . . 314.24 

1 Order for board bill. July. . . 440.24 

1 Order for board bill, October, . . 323.10 

. 
i < hrder for board bill, April, 

r board bill. J 534 57 

. 



-3.94 



$996.00 



$1,467.21 






46 comptroller's report. [Jan., 






at 


i 

i 


Cromwell Hall. 

Order for board bill, April, 
Order for board bill, July, 


$54.00 
10.29 






Hi 




Danvers Hospital for the Insane. 


w 


i 

i 


Order for board bill, January, 
Order for board bill, April, 


$207.14 
180.00 




i 


Order for board bill, July, 


182.00 




i 


Order for board bill, October, . 

Connecticut School for Imbec 


151.14 


iles. 




i 


Order for board of Insane beneficiaries, 






i 

i 
i 


January, .... 
Order for board of Insane beneficiaries, 

April, ..... 
Order for board of Insane beneficiaries, 

July, ..... 
Order for board of Insane beneficiaries, 


$130.00 
130.00 
104.00 






October, .... 


104.00 



Whipple 1 s Home School for Deaf Mutes. 

1 Order for board bill, April, . . $262.50 

1 Order for board bill, Sept., . . 306.25 

Sick, Wounded, and Deceased Soldiers. 

JANUARY. 

General Hospital Society, for board bill, . $1,241.36 

Hartford Hospital, for board bill, . . 813.78 

APRIL. 

Hartford Hospital, for board bill, . . 843.94 

General Hospital Society, for board bill, . 1,415.73 

JULY. 

General Hospital Society, for board bill, . 1,355.63 

AUGUST. 

Hartford Hospital for board bill, . . 721.86 



$64.29 



$720.28 



$468.00 



$568.75 



L882.] IPTBOLLl 17 

General Bospital S srd bill, . 1.1 v 

Hartford Hospital, for board bill, . :<> 



■ 



DECK Ml 

( >rders in fav>>r of 
The Geeley Wardrobe for account rendered 

for clothing, .... $280.00 
H . Goldschmidt & Co., for account rendered 

for clothing, . . . . 87.60 

d Cemetery Association. . . 10.00 

It Bristol X Son, for account rendered for 

clothing, .... 2.00 

JANtARY. 

II. Bristol & Son, for account rendered for 
clothing, .... 

MeCullough & Robertson, for account ren- 
dered for clothing, 

W. II. Bulkeley, for account rendered for 
clothing, .... 

Haynefl & Simmons, for account rendered 
for clothing, .... 

R. P. Kenyon k Co.. for account rendered 
for clothing, .... 

JULY. 

The Geeley Wadrobe, for account rendered 
for clothing. .... 
nes & Simmons, for account rendered 
for clothing, .... 

hy Accounts. 
JANfAi. 

iers in favor of 
Greene Kendrick, for services and expenses 

as Auditor, .27! 

Hammond, for m 
as Auditor, .... 





17.50 


13.88 


7.60 


2G.GG 


59.00 


G.00 






$535.86 

£177.GMi.i.-, 



at 



id 



48 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

No. 16. 



AGRICULTURAL AFFAIRS. 
DECEMBER. 

Orders in favor of 
Nathan Hart, Treasurer, for appropriation 
- v to State Board of Agriculture, . $500.00 

JANUARY. 

W. H. Brewer, Treasurer, for quarterly ap- 
propriation for the State Experiment 
Station, .... 1,250.00 

Nathan Hart, Treasurer, for appropriation 

to the State Board of Agriculture, . 2,500.00 

APRIL. 

W. H. Brewer, Treasurer, for quarterly ap- 
propriation for the State Experiment 
Station, .... 1,250.00 

JULY. 

W. H. Brewer, Treasurer, for quarterly ap- 
propriation for the State Experiment 
Station, .... 1,250.00 

OCTOBER. 

W. H. Brewer, Treasurer, for quarterly ap- 
propriation for the State Experiment 
Station, . . . .1,250.00 

Milford and Orange Agricultural Society, 100.00 

Simsbury Agricultural Society, . . 100.00 

Rid gefield Agricultural Society, . . 100.00 

Tolland County Agricultural Society, . 200.00 

Suffield Agricultural Society, . . 100.00 

New Milford Agricultural Society, . 100.00 

Windham County Agricultural Society, . 200.00 

Woodbury Agricultural Society, . . 100.00 

Guilford Agricultural Society, . . 100.00 

Tolland County East Agricultural Society, 100.00 

Clinton Agricultural Society, . . 100.00 

Danbury Agricultural Society, . . 100.00 

Woodstock Agricultural Society, . . 100.00 

Watertown Agricultural Society, . . 100.00 

Union of Monroe Agricultural Society, . 100.00 



L882.] 



COM!' 



19 



[cultural 5 
Killingworth Agricultii 
Now I 

;<> and Bethany Agr cultural 
. 
cultural S 
jjricultural Society, 
d Agricultural 5 



' 
















1 




1 




100.00 




10n.no 






$13,100.00 



( 

( 



No. 17. 



NATIONAL '.i tBn. 

- of Military ' 
■ 

in favor of 
urd Harlandjfor his salary as Adjutant 

•ral. .... $100.00 

L. \V. Wessells, for hi- rter- 

ma~ ral, . .101 

ary as Assistant 
Adjutant-General, . . L&O 

T, < . - v as Assistant 

Quarterma.v ral, lo' 

ird Harland. for hi flit- 

-ral .... L0< 

L. W. Wessells, for his salary as Q 

ma . 116.44 

F. D, 

. 
H. E 

. 
r his salary 

IS 



50 



COMPTROLLER S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



1 

at 

> 









T. C. Swan, for his salary as Assistant 

Quartermaster-General, . . 150.00 
T. C. Swan, for his salary as Assistant 

Quartermaster- General, . . 49.31 

A. W. Green, for his salary as Clerk, . 116.66 
H. S. Fuller, for expenses as Surgeon 

General, .... 2.20 

D. P. Nichols, for services as Auditor, . 32.00 

R. W. Farmer, for his services as Auditor, 21.00 

FEBRUARY. 

Alexander Harbison, for his salary as 

Quartermaster- General, . . 100.00 

Simeon J. Fox, for his salary as Assistant 

Adjutant-General, . . . 150.00 

Henry C. Morgan, for his salary as Assistant 

Quartermaster-General, . . 150.00 

A. W. Green, for his salary as Clerk, . 116.66 

Commissioners on Camp ground, for ex- 
penses, . . ,. . 325.00 

MARCH. 

Alexander Harbison, for his salary as 

Quartermaster-General, . . 100.00 

Henry C. Morgan, for his salary as Assis- 
tant Quartermaster General, . . 150.00 

Simeon J. Fox, for his salary as Assistant 

Adjutant-General, . . . 150.00 

L. H. Hotchkiss, for his salary as Clerk, . 116.66 

A. W. Green, for his salary as Clerk, . 116.66 

APRIL. 

Geo. M. Harmon, for his salary as Adjutant- 
General, .... 200.00 

Alexander Harbison, for his salary as 

Quartermaster-General, . . 100.00 

Henry C. Morgan, for his salary as Assistant 

Quartermaster-General, . . 150.0.0 

Simeon J. Fox, for his salary as Assistant 

Adjutant-General, . . . 150.00 

L. H. Hotchkiss, for his salary as Clerk, . 1 16.66 

A. W. Green, for his salary as Clerk, . 116.66 

Geo. M. Harmon, for his expenses as Adju- 
tant-General, .... 49.95 



1 B82 I PTR01 li ft'fi i:i l'" 

MAT, 

cander Barb his salary as 

I General, . . 10 

P. Bj. i amp, f<T | \ at Paj i 

ml. . . . .15 

'• his salary I . » f i r 

Adjutant-General, . . . 150.00 

Benry C. Morgan, for his 

taut Quartern] J, . L5O.00 

L. 11. Botchl .ary as Clerk, . 11- 

A. W. Green, I i lark, 1 1 1 

I-'. K. Camp, for expenses as Paymaster- 

■•ral. .... 30.00 

Ldjutant- 

35.15 

JINK. 

Harmon, foi lis -alary as A<l]'utant- 

■ ml. .... 300 
■li .1. Fox, for his salary ant 
Adjutant-General, . . . L50.00 
for his salary as Quar- 
• •nt'ial. . . . lo0. 00 
ry C. Morgan, fur his salary as Assist- 
ant '. feneral, 150.00 
L II. Botcnkias, for his salary as Clerk, . 116.66 
A. W. « J rem. for hi lark, . Ill 

JULY. 

son, for his salary as Quar- 
ts ... 100.00 
.1. < .. i Gregory, tor his sals m 

•ral. .... 250.00 

tant-lieneral. . L5< 

!lt 

Qo al. . L5C 

A. W, I rreen, for bis salai rk, IK 

K. 11.11 for his salary as Clerk 11 6 

151 

F. E 

. 



52 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

'AUGUST. 

Geo. M. Harmon, for his salary as Adju- 
tant-General, . . . . 200.00 

Alexander Harbison, for his salary as Quar- 
termaster-General, . . . 100.00 

Simeon J. Fox, for his salary as Assistant 

Adjutant-General, . . . 150.00 

Henry C. Morgan, for his salary as Assistant 

Quartermaster-General, . . 150.00 

L. H. Hotchkiss, for his salary as Clerk,. . 116.66 

A. W. Green, for his salary as Clerk, . 116.66 

W. H. Stowe, for expenses on Board of 

Survey, . . . . 7.15 

SEPTEMBER. 

Geo. M. Harmon, for his salary as Adju- 
tant-General, . . . . 100.00 

Alexander Harbison, for his salary as Quar- 

master-General, . . . 100.00 

Simeon J. Fox, for his salary as Assistant 

Adjutant-General, . . . 150.00 

Henry C. Morgan, for his salary as Assistant 

Quartermaster-General, . . 150.00 

L. H. Hotchkiss, for his salary as Clerk, , 116.66 

A. W. Green, for his salary as Clerk, . 116.66 

OCTOBER. 

Geo. M. Harmon, for his salary as Adju- 
tant-General, . . . . 100.00 

Alexander Harbison, for his salary as Quar- 
termaster General, . . . 100.00 

F. E. Camp, for his salary as Paymaster- 
General, .... 150.00 

Simeon J. Fox, for his salary as Assistant 

Adjutant-General, . . . 150.00 

Henry C. Morgan, for his salary as Assist- 

Quartermaster- General, . . 150.00 

L. H. Hotchkiss, for his salary as Clerk, . 116.66 

A. W. Green, for his salary as Clerk, . 116.66 

J. P. C. Foster, for medical examinations, 34.00 

F. E. Camp, for expenses as Paymaster- 
General, . .. . . 7.25 



L882. ] [PTBOlu B*e ai port. 

HOI ' 

wider Harbison, for his salary m Quar 

Ilia ral, 

Simeon -i Pox, for his -alary , 
Adjutant-General, 

Henry ( '. Morgan, for his salar. 

ant Quartennaster-4 teneral, 

A \\ . i iivcn, for hifl Baler I rk, 
L. II Botchki terk, 



inn mi 
150.00 
150.00 
L16.66 



I 



lBT. 

l Order for Edward Harland, Adjutant- 

General, .... 13:5. :.:> 
1 unler for Georgr M. Harmon, 

Adjutant-General, 2,000.00 

$2,13 

•,» (hi,,. 

Orders in favor of 

DBOBMBSB. 

L. W. Weesells, Quartermae •■ral, $2,000.00 

JAM \i:v. 

• iartermaster-4 General, '«>.oo 

rKBBUABT. 

] lartermaBter-General, 3,000.nn 

MAi; 

in, Quartermaster-General, 9,000.00 

MAY. 

Harbia i ral, l.ono.00 

.11 NK. 

.rbison, Quartermaster-General, l.nnn.oo 

Harbia 15,000.00 

liar':.:.— 20 

u ;.., 10,000.00 






54 



comptroller's report. 



[Jan., 



Advances to the Paymaster- General. 
Orders in favor of 

JANUARY. 

F. E. Camp, Paymaster-General, . . $2,000.00 

MAY. 

F. E. Camp, Paymaster-General, . . 8,000.00 

AUGUST. 

F. E. Camp, Paymaster-General, . . 30,000.00 



$40,000.00 



Sundry Accounts. 
Grants in favor of 

Alexander Harbison, Quartermaster-Gen- 
eral, for property destroyed by fire, see 
Resolution No. 91, 1881, . . $406.10 

Albert C. Benton, for disabilities incurred 

as a member of Guilford Battery, . 200.00 

Alexander Harbison, Quartermaster-Gen- 
eral, for Appropriation for expenses of 
1st Regiment at Yorktown Celebration, 3,000.00 



No. 18. 



$3,606.10 
$119,512.34 



GOVERNOR S GUARDS. 

Orders in favor of 

A. H. Embler, for 1st Co. Gov. Foot Guard: 

for Spring parade pay roll, 215.3V 

for Fall parade pay roll, . 238.37 

for care of Arms, . . 112.00 

for care of Uniforms, . 50.00 

F. B. Carter, Agent, for Armory rent, . 300.00 

E. J. Morse, for 2d Co. Gov. Foot Guard : 

for the Spring parade pay roll, . 131.50 
for the Fall parade pay roll, . 152.20 



15.74 



0OMP1 0L1 

■ tie Ybrktowo 1,000.00 

L. II Bx for Armory rent, . LOO 00 

i '. B. Boardman, I I luard : 

the Spring 

roll. . . 341 

the Fall parade pay roll, 

•v rent, . 225,00 






c. \V. Bl or 2d Co. < fov. Bone < hiard: 

for ill" Spring parade pay 

roll. . . . 255.69 

II II Strong, for Appropriations for Uni- 
forms. . . . . .1. too.oo 

ford, for Armory rent. . i 75.00 



$1,83 

:0.09 



No. 19. 

PRINTING AND en. , PUBLIC LAWS AND D 

DEOKMBXB. 

of 
B B. Hiiiinan. for expense of publishing 

proclamation in sundry 
Newspapers, .... 16.00 

.1 a R i .••. : . 

Ada' for account render id 

Burr Brol r acconnl oo 

Wile 

annual 

; for pru. 

tor printi 

1 1" 



56 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

FEBRUARY. 

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., for 
printing Special Acts, etc., for Secre- 
tary, ..... 4,448.90 

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., for 
printing House and Senate Journals, 
etc., ..... 2,318.45 

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., for 

printing for State Officers, . . 386.37 

MARCH. 

Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, for printing 

the Adjutant-General's Report, . 309.47 

Bingham & Dodd, for account rendered, 100.00 

APRIL. 

Evening Post Association, for printing the 

Governor's proclamation, . . 24.75 

MAY. 

Tuttle. Morehouse & Taylor, for printing 

Report of the Secretary of State Board 

of Education, .... 
Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, for printing 

for Secretary of State Board of Edu- 
cation, .... 
Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, for printing 

Sheffield School Report, 
Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, for printing 

Report of State Experiment Station, 
Adams Express Co., for account rendered, 
R. S. Hinman, for expense of publishing 

the Governor's proclamation, . 
The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., for 

printing Public Acts of 1881, 

JUNE. 

John Hooker, for Connecticut Reports, . 
Wiley, Waterman & Eaton, for account ren- 
dered, ..... 
Adams Express Co., for account rendered, 

JULY. 

Adams Express Co., for account rendered, 49.35 



1,635.35 


281.19 


122.68 


709.23 


135.20 


143.65 


1,105.30 


1,040.00 


202.50 


48.25 



1882.] 



COMPTROLLER - REPORT. 



John EL Wittiu r , for translating Public 

■nnan. . 

for publishing Public A.cta 
in German N 
Adami i < Jo., for iooounl rend 

Lockwood & Brainard Co 
printing Calendars, Reports, Bills, 
U. the Genera] As- 

ibly, 
The ( Brainard ('• 

printing Public . 5 etc., 

Lockwood & Brainard Co., for 
prinl 

AUGUST. 

lase, Lockwo- unard Co., for 

printing Agricultural Report. . 

BKFTBMBCB. 

( Orders in favor of 

as Co., for account rendered, 

Wiley, Waterman & Baton, for account 

rece; .... 

Lockwood & Brainard Co., for 

printing Reports of the Insurance Cum- 

rnisc . 

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., for 

printing House and Senate Journals, 



161.35 

1.10 



6,167.58 




1,853.97 




21 1.50 




•J. Oil. SO 




112 tfi 




121.16 




2,230.80 




3,926.60 






31.1:6 



No. SO. 





SOLDI EK8 CHILDREN 




dry T 




Deo 








Janv 








February, 


390.00 






Ma: 


.86 






"d, 


1,012.91 


■• 




Ma v. 








June, 




- 









58 comptroller's report. [Jan., 



Orders for Sundry Towns, July, 


1,478.80 


" " August, 


195.00 


" " October, 


1,815.22 


" " November, 


220.70 



No. 21. 

FISH COMMISSIONERS. 



MARCH. 

Orders in favor of 
R. G. Pike, for services and expenses as 

Commissioner, . . . $152.66 

W. M. Hudson, for H. J. Fenton's account, 600.00 

APRIL. 

W. M. Hudson, for H. J. Fenton's account, 416.76 

MAY. 

R. G. Pike, for services and expenses as 

Commissioner, . . . 115.59 

W. M. Hudson, for H. J. Fenton's account, 675.20 

W. M. Hudson, for R. B. Chalker's account, 500.00 

JUNE. 

W. M. Hudson, for C. G. Atkins' account, 800.00 
"W. M. Hudson, for George JellifTs account, 238.16 
George N. Woodruff, for services and ex- 
penses as Commissioner, . . 111.25 

SEPTEMBER. 

"W. M. Hudson, for Rankin's and Chalkers' 

account, .... 245.48 

George N. Woodruff, for services and ex- 
penses as Commissioner, . . 21.00 

OCTOBER. 

R, G. Pike, for services and expenses as 

Commissioner, . . . 212.79 

NOVEMBER. 

W. M. Hudson, for services and expenses 

as Commissioner, . . , 629.35 



r ,787.16 



$4,718.24 



; 



I omftbollbb's iibpq 
No, W. 

COMM Efl Of siiku.-mhu 

RE. 

Tderi in favor of 

W. M. EudaoB, for expenses of the Com- 

missioned, .... S 1,000.00 

I ruff, for services and I 
penses as Commissioner. . . 98.00 

Aliil'ST. 

Commissioners for expenses, . . 1,000.00 

R. G. Pike, for services and expenses as 

Commissioner, . . . 372.89 

SEPTEMBER. 

Georp' N. Woodruff, for services and ex- 
penses as Commissioner, . . 239.20 

OCTOBER. 

Commissioners for expenses, . . 1,000.00 

NOVEMBER. 

W. M. Hudson, for services and expenses 

as Commissioner, . . . 452.16 

Commissioners for expenses, . . 1,000.00 



I 



$5,102.24 



No. 23. 

STATE BOARD OI HEALTH. 



of 
'.' ( 'hamberlain, for quarterly appro- 
priation, ... 
( ' \V. Chamberlain, for his sal:; 3 re- 

tary. ..... 250.06 

hamberlain, for quarterly appro- 
priation, .... '0.00 

C. W. Chamberlain, for his salary as Seci 

. . 
C W < liamberlain, for quarterly appro 
*ion, .... 



60 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

C. W. Chamberlain, for his salary as Secre- 
tary, . . . . . 250.00 

C. W. Chamberlain, for quarterly appro- 
priation, . . . . 500.00 

C. W. Chamberlain, for his salary as Secre- 
tary, . . . . . 250.00 



$3,000.00 



No. 24. 

RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS. 



Orders in favor of 
George M. Woodruff, for his salary as 

Commissioner, . . . $3,000.00 

John W. Bacon, for his salary as Commis- 
sioner, .... 3,000.00 
William H. Hayward, for his salary as 

Commissioner, for ten months, . 2,500.00 

George T. Utley, for his salary as Clerk, . 1,800.00 
George T. Utley, for office expenses, . 365.58 

George T. Utley, for witness fees, . 5.00 



$10,670.58 



No. 25. 

BANK COMMISSIONERS. 



Orders in favor of 

James W. Hyatt, for his salary as Com- 
missioner, . . . . $2,500.00 

William Faxon, for his salary as Commis- 
sioner, .... 1,041.65 

Sam'l Q. Porter, for his salary as Commis- 
sioner, .... 1,458.35 

Saml. Q. Porter, for office expenses, . 150.00 

$5,150.00 






1882.] 



- UKPORT. 



61 



No. 26. 

in favor of 
\v. Brook i Coi da- 

jam \n . 

John W. Brooke Commissioner, for sala 

. 
D. P, I I iditor, 

EL W, Farmer, for services as Auditor, 
Simeon E. Baldwin, for professional ser 

JULY. 

John W. Brooks, Commissioner, for sala 
ries and e 

OCTOBER. 

John W. Brooks, Commissioner, for sala 

ries and expenses, 
■ 
John W. Brooks, Commissioner, for sala 

ries and expe: 






16.00 
10.50 

269.90 



6,427.73 



2,818.54 






I 



$14,011.13 



No. 27. 

\TE BOARD OF CIIARITI: 
JULY. 

iers in favor of 
S. R. ICcNaiy, fox t xj>enses of members of 

the Board, .... $48.05 

KMBKK. 

ore 
of • i. . . . . 21 I 






62 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

No. 28. 



COMMISSIONERS FOR GRADING CAPITOL GROUNDS. 


Orders in favor of 






Thomas McClunie, appropriation 


for plans, 


$700.00 


The Commissioners, June, . 


. 


300.00 


" " August, 


. 


2,000.00 


" " October, 




1,000.00 




$4,000.00 







No. 29. 



NEW STATE HOUSE. 



William Angus, for appropriation for la- 
bor and material furnished, . . $5,041.61 



No. 30. 

AMOUNT OF TAXES REFUNDED. 

Orders in favor of 
Town of Danbury, Tax erroneously paid, . $39.21 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Co., Tax er- 
roneously paid, . . . 240.00 



$279.21 



No. 31. 



COMMISSIONERS OF PHARMACY. 



1 Order for Stephen Goodrich, Treasurer, 

for expenses, . . . . $151.95 






I 



GENERAL ACCOUNT 



OK AM, 



Receipts and Expenditures 



FOR THE 



Fiscal Year ending November 30, 1881. 



64 
Dr. 



comptroller's report. 

General Account of Expenditures. 



[Jan., 



For payments from the Treasury from the 30th of November, 1880, to 
the 1st of December, 1881, for the current expenses of Government, 
as per preceding accounts under the following heads, viz. : 



No. 






1. 


Sessions of the General Assembly, 


$105,487.50 


2. 


Salaries and Expenses in Executive 




offices, 


. 24,880.70 


3. 


Judicial Expenses, 


. 201,805.30 


4. 


Board of Prisoners in County Jails, 


57,417.42 


5. 


State House, . 


28,009.76 


6. 


Contingent Expenses, 


16,288.48 


7. 


State Board of Education, . 


11,221.27 


8. 


State Normal School, 


. 26,300.00 


9. 


Common Schools, 


219,851.50 


10. 


State Library, 


6,232.87 


11. 


State Prison, . 


10,850.68 


12. 


State Reform School, 


51,468.18 


13. 


Connecticut Industrial School, 


45,800.21 


14. 


State Paupers, 


3,876.40 


15. 


Humane Institutions, 


177,680.45 


16. 


Agricultural Affairs, . 


13,100.00 


17. 


National Guard, 


119,512.34 


18. 


Governor's Guards, . 


5,340.09 


19. 


Printing and Circulating Public Laws 


J 




and Documents, . 


32,031.16 


20. 


Soldiers' Children, 


7,787.16 


21. 


Fish Commissioners, . 


4,718.24 


22. 


Shell-fish Commission, 


5,162.24 


23. 


State Board of Health, 


3,000.00 


21. 


Railroad Commissioners, 


10,670.58 


25. 


Bank Commissioners, 


5,150.00 


26. 


Insurance Commissioner, 


14,011.13 


27. 


State Board of Charities, 


262.64 


28. 


Commissioners for Grading Capitol 






Grounds, 


4,000.00 


29. 


New State House, 


5,041.61 



188:2.] VPTROLLBB'fl REPORT. 

Genrr.i ' '$. 



By payments 3Qth of A , 1880, to 

tin I r, 1881, 

dance o£ aocount Deoember l, 1880, $90( 

By Miscellaneous B . . 3,4!I4.80 

By & :n [nsnrance Commisfioner, 14,84 

By Bank Commissioners 1 Salaries, . 5,000.00 

By Salaries, . 11,071.50 

By F< m b from : . 1,046.00 

By Feee from Executive Secretary, . 342.00 
By Tax on (■ miums of Insurance 

Co: .... 1,693.11 
By Tax on Mutual Insurance Companies of 

other States on the valuation of poli- 
oed by them and owned by 

s of Connecticut, . . 2,046.05 

By State Taxes from Towns, . . 490,436.56 

By IfilHtary Commutation Taxes, . 93,188.40 

By Taxes from Telegraph Companies, . 3,61. 

By Taxes from Express Companies, . 4,202. it 

By Taxes from Mutual Ins. Companies, . 396.332. To 

By Taxes from Railroad Companies, . 383,04."..:. | 

I from Savings Hanks. . 163,697.89 

By Taxes from Non-resident Stockholders, 7 

By Taxes from Agents of Foreign Ins. Cos., 15,700.79 
:s erroneously r to As- 

sesors of To- . . 181 

By Receipts of Shell-fish Commissioners, . 8,369.69 

By Receipts of Commissioners of Fharma 831. 10 

By I: nit, . . 25 : 



I 



Attor- 
ney, New ( ounty, . | 
of \Y. F Willr. or- 

. 
of W. Han or 

2, 1 ': ' 

9 



17,079.54 



6Q 
Dr. 



comptroller's report. 

General Account of Expenditures, 



[Jan., 



30. Account of Taxes Refunded, 

31. Commissioners of Pharmacy, 



279.21 
151.95 



$1,217,389.07 

Interest paid on State Bonds, . $288,450.00 

Interest on Balance of Principal of the 



School Fund, . 



To balance of account carried forward to 
December 1, 1881, 



1,990.28 



Interest on Revenue of the School Fund, 1,998.68 
Civil List Order No. 965, outstanding last 

year, ..... 27.25 



$292,466.21 
$1,509,855.28 

1,118,892 55 



$2,628,747.83 



J 






KFTROLLl DDT. 






I B. EL Hill, 8t»te Alt. .nicy, 

.Mty, 
f T. M. Wall 
. LondoD < Jo 

-.den. State At 

.ty. 

By Cash of John .1. Penrose, State A-- >r 

v, Windham County. 
By Cash of James Huntington, Stat 

mty, 



From A va its of ( 

D. Osborne, Clerk of New 

Haven Superior Court, 

By ('ash of B. L Cundall, Clerk of Wind- 
ham Superior Court, . 

By Cash of EL 0. Dimock, Clerk of Tolland 
erior Court, 

By Cash of ( . K Fellowes, Clerk of < 
of Common Fleas, Hartford Count 

By Cash of J. S. Fowler, Clerk of Court 
of Common Pleas, N. Haven County, 

By Cash of W. K. Norton. Clerk of Court 
of Common Pleas, FairheM County, . 

By Ca V. Hurlbut. Clerk of L 

field District Court, 



3,161.86 
3,074.39 

2,2 1 

^.s^:;.T7 



$407.54 



109.70 



49.61 






732.80 









19,71 



1,893.61 



Balan combe? i I M L 



$1,118,88 



68 comptroller's report. [Jan., 

Dr. General Account of Orders on the School Fund from 



1 Order, for D. P. Nichols, for services 

as Auditor, . . • . $64.00 

1 Order, for R. W. Farmer, for services 

as Auditor, .... 42.00 

8 Orders, for Henry C. Miles, for his sal- 
ary as Commissioner, eight months, . 1,333.30 

2 Orders, for T. Baker, for his salary as 

Treasurer, two months, . . 50.00 

1 Order, for Jeremiah Olney, for his salary 

as Commissioner, three months, . 500.00 

10 Orders, for D. P. Nichols, for his salary 

as Treasurer, ten months, . . 250.00 

4 Orders, for Carnot O. Spencer, for his 

salary as Clerk, four months, . 600.00 

12 Orders, for "William H. Pond, for his 

salary as Clerk, one year, . . 1,512.50 



$4,351.80 



Orders drawn by the Comptroller on the 
Treasurer from the 30th of November, 
1880, to the 1st of December, 1881, for 
the amount of School Dividend due to 
sundry Towns for the support of schools, 100,611.70 

$104,963.50 



1 882.] OOXPTBOLLIR'fl 

the 30 1 I 



i ' drawn by the ( Comptroller on 

th<- Treasurer, and paid by him, from interest on 
the School Fund, from the 30th oi November, 
1880, to the 1st of December, i ss L aa perComp- 
trol] sounts and Auditor's Report, . 



i 



$104,'.' 



70 



C031PTR0LLER'S report. 



[Jan., 



•91 



SS8SS 

oo co'co co eo 



•saoijruneai atreainH 
' 'SI 



•ajadmrg a^tus 
tl 



•pOTpg 

•si 



*5l 



888S3 



ami 



CO t-rjOOrH 
© C-C2Tl< (M 



■ Scncot 



•II 



£8 S3 3 3 

i in tj 5s aS 



•oi 



i e- «?> as £• 
i as io r-t oq 



•siooqog uoraraoo 
•6 






*8 



•aon 
-■BDtipg; jo pjsog a^g 
•i 



•sasaedxH juaSutiuoo 
•9 



•sanoH WS 



at sjaaoflua jo piBog 
•f 



•sasaadxji l«pipnp 
•8 



88S§8 



COOC\C3J(?»_ 
00 OT OS OS r-t 



eoeoco^jSJ 



£332! 



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•Biaaotsaiannoo ^treg 
•95 



aiauoxesxraraoo pvoiifBy; 
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■q?I«aH jo pjBog 8WS 
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-uoissiramoo qetj-lpqS 
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71 



\r OF THE COST OF PRE KROM 

urn i. i 

Wiley, Wat n: 

900 Reports of the Quarter ral, 

1,000 " u . 74.94 

1,000 oonoerning Ja . . 77.7.", 

600 Rolls of the ] v7.~> 

Public Act? of 1S78, . . . . 17- 

:ig: 
1,100 Reports of rs, 

1,100 of Industrial School, . . . l.v 

1,100 of Connecticut Hospital for the Insane, 1 :;5.00 

The Meriden Republic 
1,100 Reports of State Reform School, . 110.00 

Tutl Taylor: 

1,100 Reports of the Adjutant-General, . 309 

6,300 •' of State Experiment Station, . . 70 

1,100 of Sheffield Scientific School, . . 122 

3,000 oi - ry of State Board of Educa- 

tion, .... 1,63 

Blanks, School Re,. 'c, for Secretary of S 

Board of Educatien, . 281.10 

John Hooker: 

- Copies of Connecticut Reports, . . 1,040.00 

The I toe, Lockwood & Brainard Co. : 

' Copies of Special Acs. etc., . . 4,448.90 

600 Copies each of Senate and House Journals, 2.'_'s8.45 

800 Reports of State Attorn. 30.00 

Printing for State Officers, 

25,000 Copies of PuK .1.1' 

2,000 oi Public Acts, . . vi:» 

oi Special A . . \ f \, 

2,100 of Governor's Message, 

i>orts of Bank Commissioners, 7 75.90 

2.100 of Town Indebtedness, 17 

i : School Pond Commissi »i 
of Comptro 

. 
1,100 on Gra 



comptroller's report 



1,100 Reports of State Board of Health, 

1,100 

1,900 

1,100 

5,000 

1,600 

1,600 



of State Treasurer, 

of Railroad Commissioners, 

of Capitol Commissioners, 

of State Board of Agriculture, 

of Insurance Commissioner, Part 1, 



of 



Part 2, 



600 Copies of Senate Journal Regular, 

50 " of " " Daily, 

600 " of House Journal, Regular, 
300 " of " " Daily, 

Printing for State Officers, 
Calenders, Bills, Resolutions, etc., for the Gen 
eral Assembly, . . 



[Jan., 

830.85 
117.80 

1,063.40 
25.00 

2,911.80 

1,482.58 
748.28 

1,605.20 
302.75 

1,576.05 
418.00 
653.82 

2,519.52 



SECOND ANM ' \\. REPORT 



Comptroller of Public Accounts 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT, 



is 1:1 \.k riOF i i in: 



CRIMINAL BUSINESS OF THE COURTS 



Year Ending July 1, 1881 



As Shown BY THE RETURNS OP Tin STATE ATTORNEYS. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF Till I TURE 



I! \KI FORD, MAN 
PRI88 OP WiLBY 



I 



State of <£>onnr(tirut. 



BTAT1 01 ( ONNtt lit DT, 

( omitkoI.i.kh's Offiob, Jahuabi I. A I) If! 

1\> (fit lloif>r>0>l< th<- s,u.it(' and Rtnut of R*pre$etUalivet, m 

• ... 

In compliance with to act pinned Jsnusry Session, A.l>, 1979, I here 
with submit the anna il reports of the state Attorneys, concerning the 
criminal business «»t' the courts, and their suggestions in regard to the 
administration of criminal law, for the year ending July I, i s> i 

I have alto given ■ summary of ill the report! from which ■ <• parison 

with the report of the preTiona year shows an increase in the number of 
lispoeed of daring the year of two bundred ind sixty cine, (269), 
while the number <>f convictions irss twenty-seven (27) leea 

There w;i> a disagreement <>f the jury in eighteen cases as against thirty 
in the preceding year. The whole number of prosecutions for different 
crimes was one thousand seven hundred and sixteen. 

Respectfully submitted, 

97HBELOGE T. BATOHELLBR, 

ComjitmlU, . 



( 

( 



I 



< 



RETURNS OF THE STATE ATTORNEYS 



SI \ I i: OF CONNECTICUT 



A I fORNBl rOH HERTFORD < 01 Mi 



To the CkmpkviUr: 

The busmen of thi> 
been .1- foil 



office during the rear ending Julj 1. 1881. !i 



Total number of c teei dispos* -I of during tb< 
Of these ce x - . 

ic in court for l term. 
re in court for 2 terms, 
re in court for ■'< terms. 
8 were in court for 1 terms, 

B u t re in court t<>r 5 term-. 
1 \v:i- iu court tor 7 trim- 

l ins in court for 8 terms. 
I iras in court for '.» terms. 

i h sa in court for l" terms 

1 eras in court for 1 1 term-. 

Total number of days the criminal court was in sessi 

number of trials during the year, 
\ i to persons tried the result folloa - . 

Number ol persons convicted, 
Number of persons acquitted, 
Number of p< i whom jury disagreed, 

iber soquitted on ground of insanity, 

Total number ol persons tried, 

led g 1 1 i 1 1 j . 
bondi forfeit 
it of forfeited bond 
Total number of noil,* absolute 

Total nam ■ om tin- docki I 

Died pending trial, ..... 
Number of original informations, . 
Number of appealed oasei 



148 



15 

I 

1 



17 
|1000.00 

I 

I 

V*J 



G 



The appealed cases were disposed of as follows : 

By verdict of jury, . 
plea of guilty, . 
nolle absolute, . 
nolle on terms, . 
erasure from docket, 
forfeiture of bond, 



3 

17 

45 

15 

4 

1 

85 



The whole number of prosecutions for different crimes was as follows : 

Prosecutions for murder, .... 

" '' rape, .... 

" " manslaughter, 

" " obstructing railroad, 

" " arson, .... 

" " burglaries^ 

" " horse theft, 

u " theft from person, 

" u other thefts, . . 

" " embezzlement, 

" " false pretences, 

l - " adultery, .... 

" " perjury, .... 

" " violation of tramp law, . 

" " assault with intent to commit State Prison offences, 

" " conspiracy, 

" " other common law misdemeanors, 

" " assaults and breacli of the peace, 

" " violations of Sunday Liquor and License Laws, 

u " other statutory crimes, .... 



1 
1 
2 
1 
6 

12 
2 
2 

16 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
7 
5 
2 

34 

43 
6 

147 



Number of second convictions for same crime, . , 

Number of third convictions for same crime, 
Of the 160 persons prosecuted during the year, there were pun- 
ished or discharged upon terms : 
On verdict of guilty, ...... 

u plea of guilty, ...... 

By forfeiture of bond, ...... 

By payment or part payment of fine and costs, 



9 
45—54 
3 

28 

85 



Confined in State Hospital on acquittal on ground of insanity, 



Discharged without terms : 

. | r- . liit of juiv, ...... 1 

M noil** absolute, ...... 

'• n!< tectivc appeals, ...... I 

Tin- oosta taxed in each < : bi w< Ti- us fbllowi i 

Upon bound ■dVrr cases : 

\Vh, re there wee ■ trial, . . . . $9 

plea of guilty irai entered, .... 1 ,768 06 
■...//, was entered, . . . . . 9 



$8,6 

Upon appealed cast 

Where there was ■ trial, . . . . . *- 

plea of guilty was entered, .... 176.72 

•' neOt was entered, . . . . . l ,45 1.30 



$2,007.36 

Total amount of costs taxed in 146 . $6,605.80 

_.- eosti taxed in each case disposed of, . . . 89 12 

Average coste taxed m each bound over case, . . .61 it 
ige costs taxed in each appealed ca 

Attention is called to the difficulty of dealing with prosecutions under 
the Sunday Liquor and License Laws. 

rly one-third ol the eases disposed of during the past year, 
itione of thie character. 
Host of such cases where there ia ■ conviction before the Justs 
Police Court, are appealed to the Superior Court ; bj the time ■ trial can 
be had in that Court, the inclination of witnesses to testify has abated, 
their memory baa become defective, and too often th< 
the delay to prepare ■ false defei i 

Han] | i RBCutiom ire Injudiciously commenced and carried on. 

Indignation against the constant violation of thelaw, suddenly aroused, 

to the hasty bringing of a number of prosecutions, the evidence 

prepared is barelj sufficient before the Justice Court, and by the 

time the appeals are readj for trial at the Superior Court, it la Impossible) 

btain conviction* The righteous indignation has cost the 
<>r $600, and made the defiant violation of the law yet more marked. 

The difficulty in procuring evidence tempte the injudicious | 
to allow himself to become the Instrument of private malice in -t uting ■ 
prosecution, or top rc-s :i pr« >-.-<ut i< m when- the violation i- really i 
and ought to be overlool 



» 



A notion that the multiplication of insufficient evidence will make up for 
the lack of direct testimony induces an unwarrantable expense in Justice 
trials, an expense which is unjust to the accused in case of conviction, and 
a serious tax upon the State in the more usual event of acquittal or dis- 
charge. Three appeal cases are now pending in which the costs taxed by 
the Justice are respectively $58.47, $61.56, and $173.13. 

There are two essentials to the efficient enforcement of the license law, 
or of any similar excise law : 

1. A single direction of the prosecutions. 

A definite policy as to the enforcement of the law should be adopted, 
and uniformly followed throughout the county. 

2. Funds sufficient to organize a system for the detection of violations, 
and to properly prepare the evidence to be laid before the prosecuting 
officer in cases demanding prosecution. 

If this State had an excise officer, charged with the duty of collecting 
the taxes, fines and forfeitures under the License Law, and furnished with 
sufficient funds to thoroughly perform this duty, we would find the law much 
more efficiently enforced, the increase in the taxes and fines collected 
would pay the expense of the enforcement, and all prosecutions before 
the courts would be, as every criminal complaint ought to be, under the 
sole control of regular prosecuting officers acting in the ordinary way. 

But this law as well as any law of similar character can never be fully 
enforced, so long as the State remains without a Primary Court of final 
jurisdiction. The reorganization of our primary courts is absolutely 
necessary to secure the efficient punishment of all minor offences, espec- 
ially that class of offences, where the criminal act is a moral wrong only as 
it is in violation of Statute Law. 

WILLIAM HAMERSLEY, 

State's Attorney for Hartford County. 
Hartford, July 19, 1881. 



m:\v iayia COUNTY. 

i/>tn>I/t r of Puf'lir .1 

Sn; Herewith I send yon i statement of the bu 

tor tli> ing July l>t, l s H 

Dumber of cases disposed of during the year, . . *>1<> 

Number of tenni the) irere In oonrt: I case foi L 6 term I i 

t'.»r Lfl terms ; or 14 term ; i « ■•■- - lor i:t t» rm- . 

tor l*J tonus; *.i cav,- |,,r 11 term-*: yu cum for 10 terms; IT 

- for 9 tei in- . - for T terms ; l '•• 

- for 6 terms ; I es for t t. 1 dm 

- foi 8 terms - B terms; 849 cases for i term; 

total. 610. 

. number of trials, and their results : 
Number of convictions, . . . . . . 1 7 

Number of acquittals (8 <>n Bole ground of insanity), . . 9 

Number of cases in which there was disagreement of jury, . S 

Number of pleas of guilty, ..... 

i- forfeited : 
Number, ........ 

Amount, ....... 

Number of noUet absolute, ...... 881 

Number of nottet upon terms, ..... 162 

Number of original informations, ..... 

Appealed cases end their disposition by verdict: 
Number by verdict, ...... 7 

Number ■•: guilty, ..... :j 

Nun absolute, ..... 

Number disposed of upon payment or part payment of tine below 
and i . . . . . .Ml 

Whole number of prosecutions for different crin 

Number of second convictions for the same crin . . none. 

Number o/ third convictions for the same crime, . . . none. 

TELTON K. DOOLITTLE, 

• 'j . I ttOi ■ \ ' ''inty. 



NKW LONDON 0O1 M 

• •ut of tli«- bu 
for the year ending July l-t. i - 

• I of during t be fear, 
2 



10 

Number of terms they were in court : 64 cases for 1 term ; 32 cases 
for 2 terms; 18 cases for 3 terms; 9 cases for 4 terms; 2 cases for 
5 terms ; 7 cases for 6 terms ; 3 cases for 7 terms ; 4 cases for 8 
terms; 4 cases for 9 terms; 1 case for 10 terms; 1 case for 12 
terms; total, 145. 
Total number of trials, and their results : 

Number of convictions, . . . . . 13 

Number of acquittals (2 on grounds of insanity, and sent to 

Retreat), ....... 7 

Number of cases in which there was disagreement of jury, . 3 

Number of pleas of guilty, ...... 28 

Bonds forfeited : 

Number, ........ 28 

Amount (reduced in most of the cases by court), . $7,975.00 

Number of nolles absolute, . . . . . 43 

Number of nolles upon terms, . . . . . 13 

Number of original informations, ..... 42 

Appealed cases and their disposition by verdict : 

Number by verdict, . . . . . . 12 

Number of pleas of guilty, . . . . . 13 

Number of nolles absolute, ..... 84 

Number disposed of upon payment or part payment of fine below 

and cost : Cases settled in court below, ... 9 

Cases sent from court below for taxation of costs, . . 5 

Whole number of prosecutions for different crimes, . . 177 

Number of second convictions for the same crime, . . none. 

Number of third convictions for the same crime, . . none. 

THOMAS M. WALLER, 

State's Attorney for New London County. 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 



To the Comptroller of Public Accounts : 

Sir : — Herewith I send you a statement of the business of this Office 
for the year ending July 1st, 1881 : 

Total number of cases disposed of during the year, . . . 377 

Number of terms they were in court : 228 cases for 1 term ; 36 cases for 

2 terms ; 40 cases for 3 terms ; 30 cases for 4 terms ; 30 cases for 5 terms ; 

5 cases for 6 terms ; 4 cases for 7 terms ; 3 cases for 8 terms ; 1 case for 

9 terms ; total, 377. 



11 

i ii Dumber of trials and mum resu I 

Number of conricl .... 

Number of acquittals, .... 1 1 

Number ol caeca in which there w \i of jury, 

Number of pleas of guilty, ..... 

Bondi forfeited : 

Number, .... .1 

Amount, ... . fg 

Number o tbsolute, 

Number of moUm upon terms, .... B6 

Number of original informations, g 

Appealed cases and their disposition by rerdicl : 
Number by rerdict, ...... 

Number of pi lilty, ..... 1 J 

Number of noilot absolute, ..... 177 

Number disposed of upon payment or pari payment oi fine belon 

and ....... 

Whole number of prosecutions for different crimi . . 

Number of second convictions f«>r the same crime, . 

Number of third conyictions for the same crime, 

SAMUEL FB88BNDBN, 

Stats'* Attorney for Fa&rJUld Oountf 



( 



WIND1I \M COUNTY. 

- Com/>/ roller of PkNm AoOOUKU 

Siu: Herewith I send yon a statement of the business of this i 
tor the year ending July 1st, i S 

number i >f during the ye 

Number of terms they irere in court : 88 for Brst term ; 5 for leoond htih ; 
B tor third term ; I 

I number of tri.-ils. ami their • 

irictions, ..... 

Number of acquittals, ...... i 

Num ns in which tfa semen! of jury, l 

dumber of pleas of guilty, ..... 16 

I : 

Number, ....... i 

Amount, ........ 

ite, ..... 



12 



Number oi nolles upon terms, 

Number of original informations, 

Appealed cases and their disposition by verdict : 

Number by verdict, .... 

Number of pleas of guilty, 

Number of nolles absolute, 

Number disposed of upon payment or part payment of 
and cost, ..... 

Whole number of prosecutions for different crimes, 
Number of second convictions for the same crime. 
Number of third convictions for the same crime, 



fine below 



9 
25 

7 

17 
6 

20 

167 

1 

none. 



JOHN J. PENROSE, 

State's Attorney for Windham County. 



LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 



To the Comptroller of Public Accounts : 

Sir : — Herewith I send you a statement of the business of this Office 
for the year ending July 1st, 1881 : 

Total number of cases disposed of during the year, . . 210 

Number of terms they were in court : 124 cases for 1 term ; 66 cases 

for 2 terms ; 9 cases for 3 terms ; 4 cases for 4 terms ; 3 cases for 

5 terms ; 4 cases for 6 terms; total, 210. 
Total number of trials, and their results : 

Number of convictions, ..... 13 

By the 13 trials 16 persons were convicted, 

Number of acquittals (1 on sole ground of insanity, and prisoner 

so acquitted sentenced to Insane Hospital at Middletown), . 5 

Number of cases in which there was disagreement of jury, . 4 

Number of pleas of guilty, . . . . . 24 

Bonds forfeited : 

Number, ........ 1 

Amount (this bond the court ordered reduced to $12.50), . $50 

Number of nolles absolute, ...... 59 

Number of nolles upon terms, . . . . .109 

Number of original informations, ..... 69 

Appealed cases and their disposition by verdict : 

Number by verdict, ...... 8 

Number of pleas of guilty, . . . . . 2 

Number of nolles absolute, ..... 27 






i:; 

Number disposed of upon payment or part payment of tm< belon 
end •ott, ....... LOO 

Whole Dumber of prosecutions lor different crimes. 

Number of leoond oonrictions for the mom crime, . . i 

Komber of third oooTiotione for the eime crime, . none. 

i\s HUNTINGTON, 

/• Litrhji, hi Cuiuilij. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



'/'.' tic I "in Is : 



Bib Herewith 1 Bend yon ■ statement of the business of this Office 
for the year ending July 1st, i ss i 

Total Dumber of casei « i i-|>« >-«-« i of during the year, . . 77 

Number of term- they were in court : 11 casei for 1 terms; 7 casei for :; 

terms; li esses for 9 terms; 15 esses fori term; total, 77. 
I .; Dumber of trials, and their result--. 

Number of oonrictions, .... 

Number <>f acquittals, .... 

Number of cases in which there was disagreement of jury 
Number of pleas of guilty, 
Bonds forfeited : 

Number, ...... 

Amount, ...... 

sber of ncUm absolute, 
Number of iflh* upon terms, 
Nomh oal informations, . 

Appealed cases and their disposition by rerdiet : 
Number by rerdiet, .... 
Number of pleai of guilty, 
Number of noUm absolute, 

Numberdisposed of apon payment «»r part payment of Sue belou 
and ..... 

le Dumber of prosecutions for different crimi 
ond oonriotions for the same crime, 
NumU-r of thr ions for the same crime, 



w. i'. wn.I.i ox, 



14 



TOLLAND COUNTY. 



To the Comptroller of Public Accounts : 

Sir: — Herewith I send you a statement of the business of this Office 
for the year ending July 1st, 1881 : 

Total number of cases disposed of during the year, . . 71 

Number of terms they were in court : 59 cases for 1 term ; 5 cases 
for 2 terms ; 6 cases for 3 terms; 1 case for 4 terms ; total, 71. 

Total number of trials, and their results : 

Number of convictions, . . . . . . 3 

Number of acquittals, ...... 1 

Number of cases in which there was disagreement of jury, . 3 

Number of pleas of guilty, ..... 17 

Bonds forfeited : 

Number, ........ 2 

Amount, ........ $200 

Number of nolles absolute, ...... 20 

Number of nolles upon terms, ..... 28 

Number of original informations, ..... 7 

Appealed cases and their disposition by verdict : 

Number by verdict, . . . . . . 1 

Number of pleas of guilty, ..... 1 

Number of nolles absolute, . . . . . 11 

Number disposed of upon payment or part payment of fine below 

and cost, ....... 27 

Whole number of prosecutions for different crimes, . . 91 

39 violations of liquor laws. 

7 false pretences. 
1 attempted rape. 

25 breach of the peace. 

8 burglary. 
5 theft. 

1 violation of dog law. 

3 tramping. 

1 destroying personal property. 

1 defrauding boarding house keeper. 

Number of second convictions for the same crime, . . 

Number of third convictions for the same crime, . . . 

BENEZET H. BILL, 

State 's Attorney for Tolland County. 



18 



SUMMARY. 



Th« following i> :i siiimnarv of tin- stahim nt> <>f tin- attorneys l<»r tin* 

BsrarsJ Counties of the State, as shown in the foregoing ret 

il iiuihIht of cusi's ilis|in>L-fl of (luring tlie vrar. . . 1,728 

Number of terms they were in coarl : 8 for l term 

8 terms ; 148 esses for B terms; 94 cmm foi i terms; n>:; esses for B 

ten - i •; terms ; 8 1 c in - for 7 ten » s i« rmi ; 

esses for 9 term lr 10 terms; 10 esses for 11 term-: '.» 

18 terms; 4 esses for 18 terms ; or M terms; lease 

for r> t« : m for i»j terms. 

. number of trials, end th»ir results: 
Number of conrictioiis, 
Number of soqnittsls, 

Number of esses in which there wss disagreement of jury, 
Number of pless of guilty, 
Bonds forfeited : 
Number, ..... 

Amount, ..... 

Nnmber of wsffis absolute, 
Number of nsflsi upon terms, 
Numb r of origins] tnformstions, 

and their disposition bjf rerdid : 

Number i>y rerdiet, .... 

Number of pless of guilty, 

Number absolute, 

Number d f npon payment "i part payment <>f fine 

DtlOU and OOl 

itions for different crimes, 
Nnmbef «-t seeond conYictions for the ssme crime, 
Number of third oonTictions for the same crime, 



( 
( 



LOO 

n 

117 

Tim 

108 

177 
11 



IIKTOKT 



{jommifjfiioniToftheScltoolluiut 



1«> I UK 



Q ENERA L ASSEM BLY, 



J~cLTLUL.<xry Session, 188&. 



Printed by Or.lcv of the G^cucAl As-cnil-lv 



HARTFORD, OONH 
I irooD vV Brahtabo Oompami 



State of Connecticut 



U E I'O RT. 



I '/// qf //,, State oj < '■■in- 

■ . ■Inin.irij S. Mt*0fl, A. I>. 1 NV _. 

( h\ the fust day of July last, when I entered upon the dul 
of the office of School Fund Commissioner, there appeared of 
>rd, with vouchers, as constituting the principal of the 

Fund : 

Loans on bond and m of real estate 

Becurit] , to the amounl of . $1 

i the Stal ind 

sure, on which was originally loaned 195,1 
Connecticut State bonds, valued 

Han' 13 bank " " L5.61 

Cash in treasury, . . . . I 1 I 

. 12,021,846.31 

The present market vali. ink stock in i 

H of cosi is ... -T-.l" 

The Bemi-annnal Interest <>n existing real estate Loans due 

id quite as prompt! 

ly : though interest to the amount ol - 
unpaid on the 30th day 

than amount 1 880 >. <>i which 

ed. 
Tli'' in lifference and rd t.. the 

a hen due, tdently have 

tli.- ability t.» m. ■ 

.. and involv.> upon tin- department, in many in- 

mucfa perplei i and ui . 



4 SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER'S REPORT. [Jan., 

solicitations, and resulting oft-times in coercion through legal 
measures. 

The amount of real estate loans on which interest is due 
one year and more is $58,445. 

The amount loaned on real estate foreclosed and now be- 
longing to the State is . . 1202,002.33 

To which add accrued interest, expenses, and 
taxes to date of foreclosure, . . 35,614.63 



Making a total cost of . . . 1237,616.96 

A careful appraisal of said property (just com- 
pleted) makes the cash value of the same to be 141,949.00 

Showing a depreciation on the cost, . $95,667.96 

Proceedings in foreclosure have recently been instituted in 
several cases where overdue interest is of long standing, and 
others must follow, which may result in still further reduc- 
tion of values and impairment of the Fund. 

The general depreciation in values of real estate through- 
out the country within the past few years, has doubtless ha,d 
its effect upon that class of property in which this department 
is interested, but from the present outlook the valuations and 
appraisals for loans made from the School Fund were in many 
instances visionary, speculative, and largely excessive. 

What may be the wisest course to pursue in handling this 
class of property which has and may come into possession of 
the State, is a matter in which the wisdom of the legislature 
may properly be invoked. 

I have not found it convenient to enter upon the duty of re- 
appraising the real estate mortgage securities, required by law 
to be done once in three years, nor do I find a record of re- 
appraisals since the passage of the act in 1876, except to a 
limited extent in 1877 ; therefore am unable to report the 
relative valuation thereof at the present time. It is my in- 
tention to enter upon the discharge of that duty as early as 
circumstances will permit. I anticipate, however, much in- 
convenience to the borrower in many instances, and injury to 
the revenue of the School Fund for the time being, if the law 



1882.] SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER'S REPORT. 5 

referred to is enforced (in all cases) to the letter. I am 
quite sure that a large portion of that class of loans is secure, 
and the interest is being paid promptly, though it may occa- 
sionally be found that the security is not of actual double 
value. 

One hundred sixty thousand seven hundred eighty-two 
dollars ($160,782.00) of the principal of the Fund has been 
paid into the treasury during the current year, and $28,733.03 
of principal was in the treasury at the commencement of the 
current year. The amount re-invested to November 30, 1881, 
was $102,220.00, leaving balance on hand at the close of the 
fiscal year 187,295.03. Of this amount $65,575.00 has been 
loaned since that date to the present time. The amount of 
principal paid in since the 1st of December to date is 
$16,570.00, leaving balance of $38 r 290.03. Additional appli- 
cations for loans to amount of $13,000.00 have been accepted, 
but papers not completed, which leaves the amount of princi- 
pal in the treasury for re-investment 825,290.03. 

Applications for loans from November 30, 1880, to July 1, 
1881, 890,305.00, of which $54,700.00 was not accepted. 

Applications for loans since July 1, 1881, to date, $282,- 
075.00, of which $148,800.00 was not approved. 

The income from real estate loans the past year was $98,- 
914.34. The amount of dividends from bank stock was 
*16,240.00. 

Interest from State bonds and deposits, $6,988.96. 

The amount of interest due and unpaid, November 30, 
1881, on real estate loans of one and more years* standing, is 
*10,7*l.o2. 

The amount of expenses on foreclosed property during past 
year was $5,579.61, and the amount of receipts from said 
property was $4,212.72, showing an. excess of expenses over 
receipts to the amount of $1,366.89. 

It appears to have been the practice, for a few years past, 
to borrow from the anticipated revenue of the School Fund 
of each succeeding year, such convenient sum as would, with 
the revenue in the treasury on the 28th day of February, in- 
crease the distribution per capita to a desired or arbitrary 
amount. 



( 
( 

( 



6 SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER'S REPORT. [Jan., 

The amount appropriated for Schools in March last was 
$100,611.70. The amount of income in the Treasury Febru- 
ary 28, was $85,110.62. Showing an overdraft from this 
year's income of $15,501.08, which will reduce the income for 
Schools in the next appropriation this amount, unless the pol- 
icy of overdrafts from year to year is to be continued, of which 
I do not approve. 

The actual Cash in the Treasury February 28, 1881, would 
have paid for each enumerated child, about fifty-nine cents. 
The amount distributed was seventy cents. 

School Fund Revenue balance Dec. 1, 1880, $67,705.77 

Amount collected from Dec. 1, 1880, to June 30, 1881, 68,491.91 

$136,197.68 

Comptroller's orders for Schools and 
Salaries to July 1, 1881, including 
salaries due for month of June paid 
in July, $103,171.00 

Commissioner's orders for expenses to 
July 1, 1881, including bills since 
paid which were contracted and ex- 
pended prior to July 1, 1881, 6,075.04 

$109,246.04 

Balance July 1, 1881, $26,951.64 

Amount Revenue collected from July 1, 1881, to 

Nov. 30, 1881, $53,651.39 

Amount of Revenue to Dec. 1, 1881, $80,603.03 

Comptroller's orders for Schools and 

Salaries to Nov. 30, 1881, (less 

amount added for orders prior to 

July 1, 1881— of $175.00), $1,792.50 

(Salaries due and unpaid Nov. 30, 

about $450.) 

Commissioners orders for expenses 

from July 1, 1881, to Nov. 30, 1881, 910.06 

$2,702.56 



Balance in Treasury Nov. 30, 1881, $77,900.47 

Note. — Unquestioned sewer assessments, to the amount of several 
hundred dollars, remained unpaid July 1, which have been due a long 
time. 



1882.] SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER'S REPORT. 7 

In view of the apparent decrease of the Capital of the School 
Fund, by the depreciation of real estate foreclosed, and which 
will be still further impaired by losses on that class of proper- 
ty yet to be foreclosed, legislation in my judgment should be 
had. fixing the minimum amount of the Capital at which it, 
shall be kept intact, either by an appropriation from the State 
Treasury, or by applying a percentage of the Revenue from 
time to time, sufficient to attain that end. 

Some slight amendatory, and additional legislation for the 
protection and benefit of the School Fund may be suggested 
by this department to your School Fund Committee, for their 
consideration. 

The accompanying State Auditor's Report, and Tables, give 
information of the receipts and disbursements of the School 
Fund Principal and Interest, the number of children enum- 
erated and amount distributed to each town in 1881, and other 
items usually reported. All of which, including this Report, 
is respectfully submitted. 

JEREMIAH OLNEY, 

Commissioner. 
School Fund Office, 

Hartford, January 4, 1882. 



( 
I 

( 






SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER'S REPORT. [Jan., 



NO. 1. 

Abstract of the Schedule of Property and Securities belonging to and 
constituting the Capital of the School Fund of Connecticut on the 
30th day of November, A. D. 1881, as prepared by the Commission- 
er of said Fund, and by us audited and examined, and each item 
thereof compared with documents and vouchers in the office of said 
Commissioner. 

BANK STOCK AND BONDS. 

In thirteen Banks, ... $195,845.61 

In State Bonds, ..... 50,000.00 

BONDS AND MORTGAGES. 

Against individuals residing in Connecticut, $1,663,577.72 

" " ". in Massachusetts, 7,553.60 

in New York, 1,074.35 

« « " in Ohio, 16,000.00 

CASH. 

In hands of the Treasurer, - - 87,295.03 

$2,021,346.31 



We, the Auditors of Public Accounts of the State of Con- 
necticut, do hereby certify that we have audited and examined 
the schedule of the property and securities belonging to the 
capital of the School Fund of the State, as prepared and pre- 
sented to us by Jeremiah Olney, Esq., Commissioner of said 
Fund, and have carefully compared the items thereof with the 
vouchers in the office of said Commissioner on the 30th day 
of November, A. D. 1881, and find the same to be correct, 
and amounting to the sum of two million twenty-one thous- 
and three hundred and forty-six dollars and thirty- one cents 
(12,021,346.31). 

R. W. FARMER, ) . ,. 

THOS. I. RAYMOND, \ Auditors. 



1882.] SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONERS RKPOIIT 



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12 



SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER'S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



No. 5. 

STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNT OF DIVIDENDS 

Made to Schools in each year since the establishment of the School Fund. 



UNDER A COMMITTEE. 

lu the H years ending March, 1799, the Dividends were, 
1800, " «* 



UNDER A BOARD OF FOUR MANAGERS. 



$60,403.78 
23,651.10 

$84,054.88 



Year. 










Dividends. 


Tear. 










Dividends. 


1801, . 


. 


1807, $39,10a77 


1802, . 

1803, . 

1804, . 










15,959.75 
47,505.02 
49,312.71 


1808, 41,022.17 

1809, 26,540.68 

1810, 45,088.90 


1S05, . 
1806, . 










45,157.39 

47,941.87 


$372,702.56 




UNDER JAMES HILLH 


OUSE, COMMISSIONER. 


1811, . 


. $45,531.59 


1820, $58,439.36 


1812, . 










32,309.80 


1821, 










67,429.60 


1813, . 










26,075.10 


1822, 










68,013.60 


1814, . 










39,223.50 


1823, 










72,203.25 


1815, . 

1816, . 










38,878.00 
40,595.72 


1824, 
1825, 










72.190.50 
72,418.30 


1817 










40,186.32 










1818 1 , ! 










49,404.98 


$780,920.24 


1819, . 




58,020 62 






UNDER SETH P. BE* 


-RS, COMMISSIONER. 


1826, ■ 


. $72,391.95 


1839, $104,906.25 


1827, . 










72,449.75 


1840, 










103,345.00 


1828, . 










72,553.45 


1841, 










113,599.80 


1829, . 










72,573.00 


1842, 










117,493.60 


1830, . 










76.933.S0 


1843, 










118,496,00 


1831, . 










77,333.40 


1844, 










117,717.60 


1832, . 










77,067 00 


1845, 










117,730.20 


1833, . 

1834, . 










80,913.80 
80,32820 


1846, 

1847, 










119,385 00 
125,710.66 


1S35, . 
1836, . 










83,799.00 
87,773.80 


184S, 
1849, 










126,126.80 
133,336.50 


1 Q'W 










95,862.85 






loo J, 




1838, . 










99,746.40 


$2,347,563.81 




UNDER NINE DIFFER 


ENT COMMISSIONERS. 


1850, . 


. $136,050.00 


1867, $132,702.40 


1851, . 










129,108.00 


1868, 










136,015.00 


1852, . 










132,792.80 


1869, 










124,082.00 


1853, . 










132,990.75 


1870, 










124,348.00 


1854, . 










141,367.21 


1871, 










128.468.00 


1855, . 










130,054.60 


1872, 










131,748.00 


1856, . 










129,243.94 


1873, 










132,924.00 


1857, . 










143,193.75 


1874, 










133,530.00 


1858, . 










143,047.35 


1875, 










148,473.60 


1859, . 










134,033.90 


1S76, 










135,219.00 


1860, . 










131,825.00 


1877, 










137,261.00 


1861, . 










124,647.35 


1878, 










138,448.00 


1862, . 










130,850.40 


1879, 










124,585.00 


1863, . 










132,589.20 


1880, 










112,188.00 


1864, . 










134,51760 


1881, 










100,611.70 


1865, . 










132,018.75 




1866, . 








130,658.00 


$4,209,622.50 


Total undei 


• a Comm 


ittee, . 


$84,054.88 


it n 


Board of four Managers, 










372,702.56 


it ii 


James Hillhouse, Commission 


- r , • 








780,920.24 


II u 


Seth P. Beers, .... 










. 2,347,563.80 


II II 


Nine different Commissioners, 










. 4,209,622.50 


Total 
















. 






$7,794,863.98 



1SS±] 



SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER'S REPORT. 



13 



No. 6. 
Schedule of the number of VhUdren between four and sixteen years 
of age in each Town, according to the enumeration in the month of 
January, L881, and the dividend from the School Fund made to each 
Town during the year ending November 30, 1881, as apportioned by tfu 
Comptroller, with the increase and decrease of such children in each 
Town as compared with the previous year. 

HARTFORD COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 


Number of 
Districts. 


Number of 
Children. 


Amount of 
Dividend at 70 
cts. pro rata. 


5° 


o a 
w t 

Q 


Hartford..* 


10 


9,590 


$6,713.00 




62 


A \ mi 


7 
9 
9 


238 
557 
273 


166.60 
389.90 
191.10 


22 




Berlin 


10 


Bloomtield 


2 


Bristol 


13 


1,094 


765.80 


41 




Burlington 


9 


318 


222.60 


27 




Canton 


8 


540 


378.00 


11 




Granby 


6 


149 


104.30 





22 


East Hartford 


10 


786 


550.20 


45 




East Windsor 


11 


812 


568.40 


1 


37 


Enfield 


14 


1,678 


1,174.60 


1 




Karmington 


7 


721 


504.70 


24 




Glastonbury 


18 


801 


560.70 


7 




< rranby 


10 


284 


198.80 





20 


Hartland 


9 


146 


102.20 


2 




Manchester 


9 


1,589 


1,112.30 


2 




Marlborough 


4 


79 


55.30 





3 


Xcw Britain 


1 


3,352 

228 


2,346.40 


54 




Newington 


4 


159.60 


11 




Plainville 


1 


429 


300.30 


42 


g 


Rocky Bill 


4 


271 


189.70 




f 


Simsbury 


12 


382 


267.40 


27 




Southington 


11 


1,363 


954.10 




61 


South Windsor 


10 


379 


265.30 





6 


Suffield 


11 


721 


504.70 


i 


3 


West Hartford. . 


8 


362 


253.40 


2 




YVrthersfield 


6 


373 


261.10 


6 1 




Windsor 


10 

1 


787 
720 


550.90 
504.00 


35 
92 




Windsor Locks 






242 


29,022 


$20,315.40 


451 


227 



( 

( 

( 



14 



SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER'S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 


o £ 


Number of 
Children. 


Amount of 
Dividend at 70 
ctB. pro rata. 


» 2 

<o r— 
S3 ^5 

(J) .JH 

t. — 

1° 


© a 
a. a> 

So 

n 


New Haven 


1 
1 

3 

5 

5 

12 

6 

7 

11 

14 

12 

12 

6 

1 

6 

7 

8 

8 

13 

5 

1 

10 

10 

10 

6 

6 


14,548 

334 
129 
115 
763 
534 

3,104 
606 
606 
710 
351 

4,393 
175 
651 
989 
188 
338 
775 
246 
91 
611 
280 

1,080 

4,577 
107 
192 


$10,183.60 

233.80 

90.30 

80.50 

534.10 

373.80 

2,172.80 
424.20 
424.20 
497.00 
245.70 

-3,075.10 
122.50 
455.70 
692.30 
131.60 
236.60 
542.50 
172.20 
63.70 
427.70 
190.00 
756.00 

3,203.90 

74.90 

134.40 


653 
60 
",13' 

110 

27 




Westville 


7 


Beacon Falls 

Bethany 


3 


Branford 




Cheshire 

Derby 

East Haven 


13 
3 


Guilford 




Hamden 


3 


Madison 




Meriden 


350 
13 
15 
54 




Middlebury 




Milford 




N augatuck 




North Branford 




North Haven 

Orange 


19 

10 
55 

7 

239 

5 

9 


6 


Oxford 


6 


Prospect 




Seymour 




Southbury 


14 


Wallingf ord 




Waterbury 




Wolcott 

Woodbridge 






186 


36,493 


$25,545.10 


1,639 


55 



1882.] 



SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONS B REPORT. 



15 



NEW LONDON COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 



New London 

Norwich Central. . .. "] 
Norwich Town St... ! 
Norwich W. Chelsea j 

Norwich Town J 

Bozrah 

Colchester. 

Lyme 

Franklin 

Griswokl 

Groton 

Lebanon 

Ledyard 

Lisbon 

Lyme 

Montvilie 

StoningtoB 

Old Lyme 

Preston 

q 



ingtOD 

Volnntown 

Waterford 




1 
1 
1 
1 
9 
7 

12 
9 
7 

14 

» 

16 

14 
5 
7 

12 

i.) 
8 

12 
8 
5 

17 
9 

11 




2,090 

1.535 
335 
981 

2,222 
2 7 5 
612 
384 
133 
664 

1,095 
398 
316 
83 
239 
6 1 5 

337 
661 
137 
1,066 
1.640 
343 
634 







$1,463.00 j 
1,074.50 
234.50 
686.70 
1.555.40 ; 
192.50 
428.40 
268.80 | 
93.10 ! 
464.80 
766.50 

221.20 

58 10 

167.30 

430.50 

270.90 

235.90 

462.70 

95.90 

7 id. 20 

1, 14S.H0 

240.10 

U3.80 



$12,027.10 



a O 




16 



SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 



O m 



a* 



Bridgeport, 

Bethel, 

Brookfield, 

Danbury, 

Darien, 14 

Eastern, , . . , j 8 

Fairfield, | 14 

Greenwich, 19 

Huntington,. j 12 

Monroe, I 7 

New Canaan, j 11 

New Fairfield. j 7 

Newtown, I 21 

Norwalk, I 11 

Reading, 10. 

Ridgefield, . . 13 

Sherman, 6 

Stamford, 16 

Stratford, 9 

Trumbull, 6 

Weston, . . 6 

Westport, 10 

Wilton, 10 



231 






a a 2 

a.Ss 



7,135 
599 
242 

2,761 
394 
188 
817 

1.918 
605 
224 
614 
159 

1,040 

3,136 
290 
413 
157 

2,574 
921 
260 
176 
829 
412 



25,864 



$4,994. 

419. 

169. 
1,932. 

275. 

131. 

571. 
1,342. 

423. 

156. 

429. 

111. 

728. 
2,195. 

203. 

289. 

109. 
1,801. 

644. 

182. 

123. 

580, 

288. 



50 
30 
40 
70 
80 
60 
90 
60 
50 
80 
SO 
30 
00 
20 
00 i 

io I 

90 i 

80 ! 
70 j 
00 
20 j 
30 
40 



494 



12 

173 

1 



31 
40 

2 



26 

1 



11 

25 

24 

3 



6 
10 



104.80 859 



u 






23 



7 
47 



22 

2 

20 



153 



1882.] 



SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER 8 REPORT. 



17 



WINDHAM COUNTY. 



TOWNs. 



o x 

II 

So 



Brooklyn, 9 

Ashford, 10 

Canterbury 11 

Chaplin, 4 

Eastford 8 

Hampton 7 

Killinglv 18 

Plainfiefd. 13 

Pomf ret 8 

Putnam. 6 

Scotland, 5 

Sterling 9 

Thompson, 13 

Windham 11 

Woodstock, 17 



158 






.51(1 
222 
293 
137 
204 
180 

1,666 
953 
292 

1,446 
108 
227 

1,286 

1,971 
556 



si 5 - 

© 



$357.00 
155.40 

205.10 

95.90 

142.80 

126.00 

1,166.20 
667.10 
204.40 

1,012.20 

75.60 

158.90 

900.20 

1,379.70 
389.20 



16 



10,051 $7,035.70 



145 

48 

9 



31 
399 



645 



( 



6 
5 

1 
16 



26 

28 

32 



< 



114 



18 



SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER S REPORT. 



1882.] 



LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 


•S « 


° g 
II 
§ o 


Amount of 
Dividend at 70 
cts pro rata. 


° s 

I 5 
1— 1 


Decrease of 
Children. 


Litchfield 


20 

11 

9 

5 

10 

10 

16 

11. 

12 

13 

6 

9 

18 

5 

11 

8 

7 

13 

18 

1 

9 

7 

12 

9 

8 

14 


759 
268 
143 
169 
232 
288 
408 
245 
243 
380 
135 
793 
844 
396 
379 
563 
181 
882 
638 
723 
842 
146 
309 
395 
1,105 
455 


$531.30 
187.60 
100.10 
118.30 
162.40 
201.60 
285.60 
171.50 
170.10 
266.00 
94.50 
555.10 
590.80 
277.20 
265.30 
394.10 
126.70 
617.40 
446.60 
506.10 
589.40 
102.20 
216.30 
276.50 
773.50 
318.50 


47 




Barkhamsted 


20 


Bethlehem 


6 




Bridgewater 


22 


Canaan 




1 



1 


Colebrook 


13 


Cornwall 


22 


Goshen 

Harwinton 

Kent 


27 


Morris 




23 


New Hartford 

New Milford 

North Canaan 

N orf oik 


22 
16 

7 
40 
17 




Plymouth 




Roxbury 


7 


Salisbury 


27 
14 
42 
56 




Sharon 

Thomaston 

Torrington 

Warren 

Washington 






7 


13 
11 

87 
9 




Watertown 




Winchester 




Woodbury 










272 


11,921 


$8,344.70 


425 


142 



[Jan., 



SCHOOL FUND COMMlSSinNKR S RKI'OKT. 



19 



( 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 


Number of 

Districts. 


Number of 

Children. 

Amount of 
Dividend ll 70 

cts. pro rata. 


[ncreaee <>f 
Children. 

Me of 

Children. 


Middletown City . ... 

Middletown 

Haddam 

Chatham 

Chester 

Clinton 

Cromwell 

Durham 

East Haddam 

Es«ex 


1 

18 
13 

» 

4 

4 
5 
6 

17 

1 

4 
4 

7 
1 

7 


1,476 $1,033.20 

1.175 822.50 
502 351.40 
488 341.60 
226 158 
292 204.40 
393 275.10 
180 126.00 
666 466.20 
328 229.60 
123 86.10 
199 139.30 
278 L.60 
667.10 
244 170.80 
144 100.80 


61 
13 



23 


11 

19 
21 
12 

2 
8 


Killingworth 

Middlefield 


1 
32 




21 


Old Saybrook 

Portland 

Saybrook 

We>tbrook 


13 
12 




in 


7,667 85.366.90 


130 





( 

( 

( 

( 



20 



SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER'S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



TOLLAND COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 


a cc 


Number of 
Children. 


Amount of 

Dividend at 

70 cts. pro rata. 


a o 


O . 
« = 

as « 


Tolland 


13 

4 

5 

7 ' 
10 

9 

10 
15 
10 
17 

6 

8 

9 


284 
67 
115 
189 
400 
307 
264 
428 
261 

1,038 
144 

1,773 
261 


$198.80 
46.90 
80.50 
132.30 
280.00 
214.90 
184.80 
299.60 
182.70 
726.60 
100.80 

1,241.10 
182.70 


2 

2 

6 

29 

12 

113 

25 


12 


Andover 


4 


Bolton 




Columbia 

Coventry 


10 


Ellington 




Hebron 

Mansfield 

Somers 


21 


Stafford 




Union 


3 


Vernon 

Willington 


22 








123 


5,531 


$3,871.70 


189 


72 



1882.] SCHOOL FUND COMMISSIONER 1 * REPORT. 



21 



stt:m::m:^_:r,y. 



COUNTIES. 


O 

i_ OB 

. a 


I- £ 

<u ■- 

IS 

S5 


— ■- 

IS 


Amount of 
Dividend at 70 
cts. pro rata. 


Increase of 
Children. 


o d 

9 ■ 
x, «- 

S3 2 

u .c 

go 

Q 


Hartford 

New Haven . . . 
New London . . 

Fairfield 

Litchfield 

Windham 

Middlesex 

Tolland 


29 
26 
20 
23 
25 
16 
15 
13 

167 


242 
186 
214 
231 
272 
158 
111 
123 


29,022 
36,493 
17.182 
25,864 
11,921 
10,051 
7.667 
5,531 


$20,315.40 

25,545.10 

12,027.40 

18,104.80 

8,344.70 

7,035.70 

5.366.90 

3,871.70 


451 

1,639 
214 
859 
425 
645 
130 
189 


227 
55 
144 
15.3 
142 
114 
149 
72 




1,537 


143,731 


$100,611.70 


4,552 


1,056 



Whole number returned, 1881 143,731 

" 1880 a. ..140,235 

Increase 3,496 



( 



( 



•I 

( 
( 
< 




ft 



I 



*3 



SIXTEENTH REPORT 



Board of Trustees 






STATE OF CONNECTICUT, 
tiff ^uptnnltnbtnr$ nnh !>qa$ttm'$ Imparls; 

^rtstnttb lo tfic Cccntral Xlsstmblj at its Sigsun in 3anuao, 1SS2. 



BY ORDER OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



middletown, conn.: 
Pelton & King, Printers and Book-Binders. 



Officers of the Hospital, 



Board of Trustees. 

HOBART B. BIGELOW, New Haven. 

SAMUEL G. WILLARD, .... Colchester. 

RICHMOND M. BULLOCK, Putnam. 

R. S. FELLOWES, New Haven. 

HENRY WOODWARD, - - - - - - Middletown. 

ROBBINS BATTELL, ------ Norfolk. 

JAMES G. GREGORY, M. D., -.'-._. Norwalk. 

H. SIDNEY HAYDEN, - Windsor. 

LUCIUS S. FULLER, - ... Tolland. 

BENJAMIN DOUGLAS, Middletown. 

ELISHA B. NYE, M. D., ... Middletown. 

J. W. ALSOP, M. D., - - . . Middletown. 

M. B. COPELAND, - - - - - - - Treasurer. 



Resident Officers. 

ABRAM MARVIN SHEW, M. D., Superintendent and Physician. 
JAMES OLMSTEAD, M. D., - - First Assistant Physician. 
WILLIAM E. FISHER, M. D., - - Second Assistant Physician. 
CHARLES E. STANLEY, M. D., - Third Assistant Physician. 

HENRY S. NOBLE, M. D., - Assist. Physician at New Hospital. 

J. W. THAYER, Clerk. 

P. W. SANDERSON, - - - - - . - - Farmer. 

MRS. MARGARET DUTTON, - - - Matron. 

Mrs. J. P. PACKER, - - - - - - - Housekeeper. 

MRS. A. L. WILLIAMS, - - Housekeeper at New Hospital. 



All communications relative to the admission, etc., of Patients should 
be addressed to the Superintendent. Blanks will be furnished on appli- 
cation. 



Trustees' Report. 



To the General Assembly of the 

State of Connecticut: 

The Board of Trustees of the Connecticut Hospital for Insane 
present to the Legislature their Sixteenth Annual Report. 

On no previous occasion of doing so, has there been a feeling of 
deeper and more grateful satisfaction than at this time. There 
has been no epidemic, the deaths have been under average, and for 
the most part, have been of the aged and chronic patients. It is 
known to your Honorable Body that in July last, the additional Hos- 
pital buildings, south of what may now be called the "old hospital," 
were completed and delivered by the Construction Commission of the 
Legislature into the hands of this Board, and that the occasion was 
availed of to suitably celebrate the 15th anniversary of this Institution. 

Sad as it may be in one view of the case, that there existed in the 
State insane persons scattered here and there, waiting for the shelter 
of these additional public buildings, it must, in another view, be a 
source of sincere gratification to the people of the State, that through 
their Representatives in the General Assembly, good and permanent 
provision has been liberally made for the waiting insane by well con- 
structed accommodations suited to their needs. 

The equipments of your Hospital are now in a nearly complete 
condition. The experience of fifteen years has not been an unpro- 
ductive one. The laundry, kitchen, bakery and heating arrange- 
ments are admitted by experts to be most convenient and excellent. 
When one realizes that daily over 900 people must have regular meals 
and that the "weekly wash" is of ten to fifteen thousand pieces, it 



4 

will be appreciated how needful are good, convenient and "time- 
saving " appliances for so much real work. 

The high commendations of the venerable Dr. Earle of Northamp- 
ton Hospital, in his remarks at the memorial gathering in July, will be 
remembered by all who heard him speak of Connecticut's advance in 
practical philanthropy, as shown in this Institution. 

No grave and expensive mistakes have been made, either in the 
construction or administration of this State Hospital. What has been 
done reflects praise of your Superintendent, Dr. Shew, who, since its 
inception in 1866, has been its efficient executive head. 

To his Report you are referred for details of the patient-population, 
of the expenditure of the Legislative appropriation, and of the special 
care and labor required for the preparation of rooms for the occupa- 
tion by 262 patients of the New Buildings. 

The long continued, unusual drouth tried our water supply as never 
before, and we have taken steps towards securing a fuller supply in 
the future for our increased number of patients. 

The officers of the Institution have been faithful and active in 
their duties. 

The Treasurer's Report is printed with these. 

The marked rise of provisions has for the latter portion of the year 
materially increased the expenses of maintaining the large family under 
our care. 

It is our duty to mform the Legislature that the South Wing of the 
New Building reaches so very near the limits of the land owned by 
the State, that there is not space enough even for a drive-way between 
it and the fence of the adjoining land. The owner of this small ad- 
joining tract has a good h^seon it with out-buildings, and has 
offered it to the State for $6 ,500.00, - and has consented to keep the 
offer open for the action of the Legislature. The land is good garden 
land, and could be made with the house very useful. Previous to 
the erection of the New Building it was not thought absolutely neces- 
sary, although very desirable, that the State should own it. It is not 
likely ever to be acquired again at so low a price. Members of other 
Boards of the State have urged us to make formal application to your 



Honorable Body for the .^50Gree-, for this important purchase. We 

respectfully ask the Committee on Humane Institutions to visit at an 
early moment your Hospital, and to give this matter the consideration 
it deserves. 

The terms of office of the members from New London and Wind- 
ham counties expire with this year. Their re-appointment is much 
to be desired, and is herewith requested. 

We are grateful to God that His benign blessing has rested on this 
State work under our supervision. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Hobart B. Bigelow, New Haven. 

Samuel G. Willard, Colchester. 

Richmond M. Bullock, Putnam. 

R. S. Fellowes, New Haven. 

Henry Woodward, Middletown. 

Rorbins Battell, Norfolk. 

James G. Gregory, Norwalk. 

H. Sidney Hayden, Windsor. 

Lucius S. Fuller, Tolland. 

Benjamin Douglas, Middletown. 

Elisha B. Nye, Middletown. 

J. W. Alsop, Middletown. 



Superintendent's Report, 



To the Board of Trustees of the 

Connectic u t Hosp i ta I for Insane : 

Gentlemen : — In compliance with custom and legal requirement, 
I herewith present a record of the most important events in the history 
of this Hospital for the year ending November 30, 1881. 

The special details relating to the admission and discharge of 
patients and of the expense of maintenance, are shown in the accom- 
panying tables. Some notion of the labor, anxiety and care incident to 
this period will be suggested by the facts that the admissions were 
about equal in number to the total in any previous two years, that 
the regularity and usual order was disturbed by the removal of 250 
chronic patients to the new Hospital and the admission of an equal 
number of new cases to the old; and that a larger proportion of these 
were acutely insane, with suicidal and destructive propensities, re- 
quiring constant and untiring vigilance. We have reason to be grate- 
ful to God for the general good health which has prevailed. A few 
mild cases of rubeola occurred in the month of April, showing that 
the atmospheric causes prevailed here as in the surrounding country. 
Whether considered in relation to the number of persons under treat- 
ment, to the result attained, or to the improved facilities afforded, this 
report covers the most important year in the history of this Institu- 
tion. There were at its commencement, 529 patients ; 352 new cases 
were received, making a total of 881 under treatment during the year. 
The average number present was 608.51, but the number remaining 
at the end of the year is 731.* The following table exhibits in a 
condensed form the movement of the population : 



*At the date of publication of this note, Jan. 1, 1882, there are 750 
patients in the Hospital. 





Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


No. at beginning of year, 


251 


278 




Admitted in the year, - 


193 






Total present in the year, 


444 


437 


88i 


Discharged — Recovered, 


33 


20 


53 


Improved, 


16 


4 


20 


Stationary, 


28 


5 


33 


Died, ... . 


32 


1 2 


44 


Remaining at end of year, - 


335 


396 


731 


Average per cent, during year, 


293-I7 


315-39 


608.51 



To prevent any misunderstanding of the tables, it should be remem- 
bered that the name of a patient is only entered on our records once 
in any one year. That is, every admmission represents a person. 
For instance, 352 different persons were received during the year ; 88 
of these had been admitted and discharged in previous years, and 
46 were transferred from other hospitals, as shown by the following 
table : 



ADMISSIONS. 



Number of first admissions, 
Number of second admissions, - 
Number of third admissions, 
Number of fourth admissions, - 
Number of fifth admissions, 
Transferred from other hospitals, 

Total, 



Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


121 


97 


218 


36 


29 


65 


9 


5 


14 


5 


2 


7 


2 


— 


2 


20 


26 


4'' 


193 


«59 


352 



Referring to the accompanying tables, No. II. is interesting as 
showing that 458 patients have been restored to health at this Hos- 
pital, and that 389 others were discharged so much improved as to 
be able to assume cares and ordinary responsibilities. It also shows 
the steadily increasing average number under treatment each year 
from 85 in 1868 to 608 in 1881. Tables No. III. and IV. go to show 
that insanity is a disease of middle life, when the mind and body are 
-most actively engaged in the struggle for an existence, or in the grat- 
ification of morbid propensities. Of 352 patients admitted in the 
year, 263 were between the ages of 20 and 60. Of 2,333 patients ad- 
mitted since the Hospital was established, 1,838 were included within 
the same period of life. Table V. gives the nativity of 2,^^ patients, 



8 

Of this whole number, 1,495 were natives of America and 838 of 
foreign countries. Conclusions drawn from the relative civil condi- 
tion as shown in table VIII. are of no special value, but the fact is stated 
for what it is worth. 1,101 patients were single, 959 were married and 
216 were widowed. We are unable to determine the civil condition 
of 57 persons who were sent to the Hospital without histories or 
friends. Table IX. is of more value as showing how and by whom 
patients are committed to this Institution. Of 2,333, one was ac ^" 
mitted by order of the General Assembly ; 50 by order of justice or 
police courts ; 74 by judges of the Superior Courts ; 1,975 by Pro- 
bate Courts; 45 by Governor's orders, and 188 by the legal guardians 
or relatives. The question, "How are patients supported?" is 
answered by table X. Of the whole number received, 188 were self- 
supporting ; 704 were " indigents," (expenses paid by the State and 
friends) ; 1,328 were "paupers," (supported by State and Towns) ; 
1 13 by the State alone. Of these various classes there are at this date, 
14 supported by friends, 198 supported by State and friends (indi- 
gents), 473 supported by State and Towns (paupers), and 46 supported 
by the State alone. I have already stated that patients have been 
promptly admitted since the opening of the new Hospital in July. 
As a result, a larger proportion of acute cases have been received ; 
but a careful study of table XI. shows the unfavorable character of 
about three-quarters of all admissions in the year. In other words, 
the disease was of such a form from the start, or had progressed so far 
before admission, that all hope of cure had to be abandoned. Of the 
352 admissions, in were of chronic mania ; 20 of epileptic mania ; 
2j of chronic melancholia ; 7 of general paresis ; 27 of chronic 
dementia; 10 of senile dementia, and 66 of imbecility; making a 
total of 208 who will probably require public care during the remain- 
der of life. This discouraging fact is confirmed in table XIV., where 
it appears that in 218 of the 352 admissions, the disease had existed 
more than one year before admission. And again, in table XVI., it 
is shown that of the 458 recoveries since the Hospital was opened, 
only 65 occurred in cases where the disease had existed one year before 
admission. If the relatives or public guardians of insane persons only 
realized the importance of early treatment away from home and the 
exciting causes, they would, I am sure, no longer neglect taking the 
necessary steps to insure early and efficient hospital treatment. The 
advantages of this policy are again made evident in tables XVII. and 
XVIII. It is here shown that the duration, of treatment (in hospital) of 
the 458 patients who have recovered was less than one year in 395 cases; 



and in 335 of this Dumber \htwhoU Juration of the disease was 

than one year. Additional proof, if needed, may be found in table 
XIX., which gives the special form of disease in those who recovered. 
3S4 were cured where the disease was acute, and only 74 where it had 
become chronic. This table also shews the relative curability of 
special forms of insanity. 

The student of Sociology may deduce some suggestive facts from 
tables XX. and XXVII., where the alleged exciting causes of insanity 
are tabulated. These deductions should be received with some res- 
ervation, as the assigned causes are often found by us to be only in- 
cidents or symptoms in the formative stage of the disease. I believe, 
however, that these tables truthfully show that " anxiety of mind," 
"ill-health" and "intemperance" are the factors most potential in 
producing mental disturbance. 

Of the 44 deaths during the past twelve months, the average age was 
51.15 years. The following table shows all of the deaths and their 
ratios since the Hospital was opened in 1868. 

Deaths and their Ratios, from May ist, 1868 to Nov. 30TH, 1881. 





1— 


. 








<v 


j>> 


, Year. 


umber 
:nts. 


:rage Nc 
ients. 




DEATHS. 




Is 


Q c 
3 T- 


- 


53:2 


> cd 








. £h 


*j <u rt 


3 


5 


aily A 
of P 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


<u O 


er Cen 
An- 
No. of 


- 


^ 


Q 


• 






Ph 


PL, 


1868-69 


268 


85-47 


U 


1 


.5 


5-59 


17.57 


1 869-70 


343 


225.17 


18 


3 


21 


6.12 


9-32 


1870-71 


307 


237 


11 


10 


21 


6.71 


8.86 


1871-72 


329 


242.58 


9 


6 


15 


4-55 


6.18 


1872-73 


336 


264.53 


12 


9 


21 


6.25 


7.86 


1873-74 


524 


239-51 


18 


17 


35 


6.67 


10.30 


1874-75 


605 


425.80 


21 


15 


36 


595 


8-45 


1875-76 


616 


452.64 


26 


7 


33 


5-35 


7-3i 


1876, 8 mos. 


548 


456.97 


9 


6 


15 


2-73 


3.28 


Dec. i, 1876 
















Nov. 30, '77 


619 


463.88 


19 


12 


3i 


5.01 


6.69 


1877-78 


629 


474.17 


27 


'5 


40 


6.36 


8.43 


1878-79 


644 


498.34 


9 


IO 


19 




3.81 


1879-80 


6 54 




16 


14 


30 


4.58 


5.82 


1880-81 


881 


608.51 


32 


12 


44 


5.00 


7.24 



Tables XXI. and XXII. give all of the known facts respecting the 
fatal terminations of 376 cases and the ages at which death occurred. 



10 

From these it appears that the disease has not noticeably shortened 
the period of life. Three had survived 90 years ; fifteen had passed 
80; forty-nine had exceeded three score years and ten; one hundred 
and twenty had passed beyond 60; and one hundred and eighty-five 
or about one-half the whole number died between the ages 50 and 91. 
Referring again to table XXII., you observe that pulmonary con- 
sumption is the most active cause of death among the insane. Next to 
this, old age, general paresis, acute mania, apoplexy and epilepsy 
stand in regular order. These six potential agencies embrace a total 
which outnumbers all others combined. The death rate at the Insti- 
tution has always been below the average, when compared with sim- 
ilar institutions in this and other countries. I attribute this to the 
favorable location, to the complete system of sewerage and ventilation 
and to an abundant supply of pure spring water. It is evident, how- 
ever, that the ratio of deaths must gradually increase so long as the 
Hospital provides for chronic cases during life. This fact is made 
evident by a study of table XXIV., where it appears that there are at 
this date ten patients between 80 and 90; twenty-six others between 
70 and 80; sixty-eight others between 60 and 70 ; and one hundred 
and eighteen between 50 and 60 years of age; thus making a total of 
222 chronic patients remaining in the Institution between the ages of 
50 and 90. It has already been shown, by our tables, that the aver- 
age age at death among the insane is 50.15 years; with these plain 
facts before us, you will hardly be surprised by a perceptible increase 
of the death rate in the immediate future, and will be ready to attrib- 
ute it to the natural and legitimate cause. It may be pardonable to 
allude to the case of a bright Christian lady who, at the age of 91, sits 
from day to day in her pleasant room busily engaged in making 
" Holders," and able to readily thread her needle without the aid of 
glasses. Our faith in the longevity of the insane is perceptibly in- 
creased while we study the next table No. XXV. Here it is shown 
that of the 731 patients remaining at the end of the year, 504 have 
been insane from three to fifty years, and at least eight of this number 
have survived mental derangement more than forty years. The good 
care which is insured to the insane, in our public institutions at the 
present day, has without doubt been an important factor in prolonging 
the lives of this dependent class. The preceding facts have doubtless 
prepared you to accept the discouraging statement made in table 
XXVI., where it appears that of 731 patients remaining at this date, 
only 45 are considered curable cases. This outlook would indeed be 
discouraging had you not already been taught " the insane are the 



11 

wards of the State,'' and that a public institution is fulfilling its 
philanthropic mission as truly in protecting and providing a home 
for the chronic insane, as in restoring to health the few curable cases 
that find their way to the Institution. 

[MPROVEMEN I 

In response to your last annual report, the General Assemby made 
an appropriation of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) for four special 
purposes. Only one-half of this appropriation has been drawn from 
the State Treasury and used under your direction. During the 
month of May, contracts were made with R. D. Wood & Co., of 
Philadelphia, to furnish 2,000 feet of heavy six inch cast iron water 
pipe, which was laid around the Hospital buildings and to connect 
the upper reservoir with the main supply pipe to the hospital. A con- 
tract was also made with Richard Pattee, of Holyoke, to furnish 
twelve double hydrants, which have been placed at equi-distant points 
around the Hospital. Our facilities for extinguishing fire would now 
seem to be as nearly perfect as human foresight could reasonably pro- 
vide. We have two large reservoirs connected with the Hospital by 
a six inch cast iron main. The upper reservoir is situated 164 feet 
above the first floor level of the Hospital. With this head of water 
it is possible to throw two or more streams above any portion of the 
Hospital roof. The entire expense was $3,075.40. This sum ex- 
ceeds by $75.40 the State appropriation. The balance was paid 
from the regular revenue of the Hospital.* In furnishing the new 
laundry building, it was found expedient to introduce some fixtures 
and labor-saving appliances together with a drying-closet on a scale 
somewhat larger than the orignal plan contemplated. This has involved 
an expense of $4,462.61, while the appropriation from the State 
amounts to only $2,000. The balance has been taken from the regu- 
lar revenue. These and other needed improvements occupied the 
time of the Hospital working force to such a degree that we have 
found it inexpedient to attempt the construction of work shops and 
additional barns. Hence, the balance of the State appropriation was 
not drawn from the Treasury and still remains to our credit. As the 
need of increased barn room and of additional cows is quite impera- 
tive, as well as a work shop where many of our able-bodied male 
patients can be employed during the winter months, I trust that no 

* Since the General Assembly made this appropriation, two State 
Asylums and one County Building for insane have been destroyed by 
fire, with loss of life. 



12 

time will be lost in carrying out these improvements whenever the 
season has advanced sufficiently to admit ofout-Juor work. 

NEW HOSPITAL. 

The most important event in this year's history was the formal 
acceptance by the Trustees of the New South Hospital. This 
occurred on the fifteenth anniversary of the organization of the Board 
of Trustees, July 20, 1881. There were present on that occasion 
His Excellency Governor Hobart B. Bigelow and other State officers, 
together with many well-known workers in the great field of public 
charities, from this and other States. It was an occasion of unusual 
interest, regarded by us as an auspicious opening of the new Building. 
To you who are familiar with the general arrangements, it is unnec- 
essary to give any lengthy description of its plan ; but for the infor- 
mation of those who may have friends committed to its charge, a 
brief account of the new Building is appended. 

It may be well to explain in advance that the intention was to pro- 
vide accommodation for the quiet chronic class, at a moderate cost, 
in a building or buildings not complete in themselves, but as supple- 
mental to the main Hospital organization. In other words, the 
intention was to have living accommodations for 262 patients, with 
the necessary kitchen and heating apparatus, together with rooms for 
the employes. The usual work of providing supplies, distributing 
the same, and exercising official supervision over the new Hospital, 
devolves upon the officers of the main Hospital, the immediate 
direction of details being placed in the charge of an additional assist- 
ant physician and a competent housekeeper. 

The new Hospital consists of three separate buildings : a central 
structure and two pavilions separated from the center by an open 
space of eight feet. All of these are constructed of brick, with 
brown .stone window caps and sills, water tables and foundation 
walls, surmounted by a steep slate roof, which is relieved by large 
dormer windows, gables, and a central tower. The style of archi- 
tecture is simple, yet pleasing. Each pavilion may be described as 
a flattened or broad letter |— |, with a bay projection on the front face. 
Then linear front of each pavilion is 151 feet, the depth of end pro. 
jection 64 feet, and of the intermediate section 36 feet. The projecting 
bay is 27 feet in width by 38 feet in length. This bay, on all of the 
stories, is used as the common sitting-room or day-room for each 
ward, and is well lighted by eight large windows. A corridor, 10 
feet in width and 154 feet in length, extends through the entire 



is 

pavilion. The accommodations for patients in cadi waul arc at fol- 
lows : there are four dormitories each in size 24 by 24 feet at the four 
extreme corners of the projections. Kach dormitory has ample BpflU <• 
for eight beds. There are nine single rooms on the corridor; also a 
room for the attendants, a front and rear stairway, a bath-room 
and clothes-room, water-closet, drying-room and broom-closets. 
The large day-room or bay, already described, opens in its full size 
from the corridor. As thus planned, with so many large windows 
opening into the dormitories, the sitting-rooms and the ends of the 
corridor, the pavilion is light, cheerful and well ventilated. It is 
three stories in height, with an attic which is used as a trunk room 
and for storage purposes. The rooms and corridors are heated by 
twenty stacks of " Gold" radiators placed in the basement of the cor- 
ridors, with flues leading independently to the different stories. Pure 
air is supplied to each stack by flue-boxes leading directly out of 
doors. In addition to this indirect radiation, there is placed in each 
dormitory, in the day-room and the extremities of the corridors, a 
direct radiator which can be used in extremely cold weather. Venti- 
lating flues, for the removal of vitiated air, extend from near the floor 
in every room up and out of the roof, each as a separate chimney 
flue. There are also two large, open fire-places in each of the day- 
rooms, and similar ventilating flues in each of the dormitories. This 
arrangement for the rapid change of air has been found to work sat- 
isfactorily without the aid of a fan. 

This general description of the North Pavilion, which is occupied by 
males, applies to the three stories of the South, which is occupied by 
females. Owing to a slope in the land at the extreme south end of 
the Pavilion, a cellar was constructed under the basement story, and 
the latter lloor level, which is three feet above ground, was made into a 
strong ward with nine single rooms and the necessary closets, bath and 
day rooms for the accomodation of a class of destructive female patients. 
Each of the ward bath rooms contains a " Mott" improved cast-iron 
hospital bath tub, hot and cold water supply, with the " McFarland " 
patent waste and overflow. A steam, fire-proof drying closet opens 
fmm each bath room, in which towels, mops, brooms or soiled bed- 
ding can be properly dried. Kach water closet is furnished with two 
cast-iron stationary hoppers which are flushed automatically, at regu- 
lar intervals, with a gallon of water from a " McFarland Automatic 
Flushing Tank," placed high up on the wall, immediately above the 
hopper. These cisterns can be adjusted to discharge as frequently as 
desired. They consist of an iron bucket hung in a cistern working in 



u 

brass journals. The filling of this tilting bucket is adjusted by a 
valve inside of the cistern, and when full tips over, emptying the en- 
tire contents at once, thereby charging the pipes and giving a thor- 
ough wash to the closets and urinals. It has been our custom to so 
arrange them that the discharge will occur every two minutes. This 
quantity of water, precipitated into the hopper through a large pipe, 
is found to be much more effectual in removing waste than a running 
stream. 

A conveniently large slop hopper and urinal with the same auto- 
matic supply has been placed in each of the closets. Two galvanized 
iron wash basins, on permanent frames, furnish the necessary facilities 
for personal cleanliness. All of the waste pipes from bath tubs and 
wash sinks are effectually closed by a " Bowers " trap. In further ex- 
planation of the system of sewerage, I would mention that all of the 
main soil pipes are of heavy cast-iron, 6 inches in diameter extend- 
ing from the main sewer outside of the buildings, up through the 
closets and out above the roof, thus affording a continuous and com- 
plete circulation of air through the main sewer and soil pipes. From 
this description it will be seen that all of the soil pipes are of heavy 
cast-iron with leaded joints, thus effectually preventing any escape 
into the building of foul air. The center building is 104 feet in length 
by 36 feet in width, three stories in height, surmounted by a slate 
roof. A one story projection in the rear of the center contains the 
kitchen, scullery and store-room. A clock tower 17 feet square is 
carried up in front and above the main building. The first story of 
the center is divided into two large dining rooms with a covered pas- 
sage way leading from each to the corresponding pavilion. Each 
dining room is furnished with tables and seats for 130 persons. The 
dish closets and wash sinks are in the rear, between the dining rooms 
and the kitchen. The kitchen proper is 40 feet in length by 20 feet 
in width. It is furnished with a range 16 feet in length, a steak 
broiler and a meat roaster; also two large soup kettles, four vegetable 
kettles, an improved coffee kettle and a similar tea kettle, all supplied 
with steam pipes and hot and cold water. Heavy iron wash sinks 
stand in convenient places, both in the kitchen and scullery. This 
apparatus was manufactured by Mr. E. Whitely, of Boston, and has 
thus far worked to our entire satisfaction. There are two windows 
and one door on the north and the same on the south side of this 
kitchen, and a large skylight opens from above, and two doors open 
into the scullery in the rear; thus, at all times, affording perfect ven- 
tilation and an abundance of light in this most important department. 



IS 

Two store rooms for supplies, each 12 by 14 feet, adjoin the scullery 
at the rear. A connecting passage way, 9 feet in length, separates 
this building from the boiler-house, which is 27 feet wide by 40 feet 
in length, one story in height. In this are placed two tubular boilers, 
16 feet in length by 5 feet in diameter. Each boiler contains 58 flues. 
In these is generated the steam used for heating the entire building, the 
water for washing and bathing purposes, and to supply the kitchen ap- 
paratus. The boilers were manufactured by Peter Amerman, of 
Hartford, and the entire heating apparatus supplied and put in place 
by the Walworth M'fg Co., of Boston. A chimney stack with an 
inner flue of 2 feet 4 inches by 2 feet 4 inches is carried up 76 feet. 
A 12 inch opening is made from the main sewer into this chimney 
flue, through which there is a continuous current. 

The second story of the center building is divided into rooms, for the 
assistant physician, the house-keeper and the farmer and his family. 
The third story is divided into four rooms for servants on the north 
side, and two large sewing rooms on the south side. For conven- 
ience of going to and from the wards to the sewing rooms, a small 
passage way has recently been completed. 

This cursory description of the New Hospital would be incomplete 
without reference being made to a comparatively new feature in its 
construction. All of the external walls consist of an 8 inch outer 
wall, a 4 inch air space and an 8 inch inner wall. These two walls 
are bound together by galvanized iron clamps. All of the partition 
walls between the halls, dormitories and single rooms are of brick. 
For the purpose of economy it was decided to omit plastering wher- 
ever it could be done, and in carrying out this idea all of the passage 
way-, bath rooms, store rooms, closets, dormitories, kitchen and scul- 
lery are finished in four coats of oil paint, laid directly on the brick 
walls; and the long corridors in the pavilion to a height of five feet 
are finished in the same manner. By this arrangement it is believed 
that there was not only economy in the original construction, but that 
also the subsequent repairs will be less than where ordinary plaster 
is used in finishing. The floors throughout the entire building are 
of selected hard maple, planed, tongued- and grooved. The wood- 
work of doors and window casings is of white pine, oiled and var- 
nished. The entire cost of these buildings, including furniture and 
fixtures, was $130,000. 

< >n taking charge of the new building it was found necessary to add 
a number of store rooms and appliances which the funds in their con- 
trol did not allow the Building Commissioners to provide. A few 



16 

of these may be mentioned, and among the number, a steam drying- 
closet for the ward for excitable female patients. Also an attendant's 
room and an additional patient's room, with the partitions and 
division walls in the basement story. As no provision had been made 
for the storage of ice, butter, milk, meat, or vegetables, mechanics 
were immediately employed to build these various rooms in the cellar 
of the center building. It has been found necessary to have some 
work done in fitting doors and windows. This need was probably 
owing to the fact that the walls were finished in winter and the casings 
adjusted while the walls were only partially seasoned. It soon became 
evident that the Hospital bakery would be inadequate to the demands 
made by the increased number of persons to be provided for. Under 
your instructions I have had an additional oven 13 feet wide by 16 
feet in length, constructed in the old laundry building with the nec- 
essary kneading-troughs, tables, wash-sinks and store-rooms. These 
various improvements had to be made immediately, and without 
waiting to ask for an appropriation to meet the expense which has 
been $1,372.77. Add to this the new boiler hereafter mentioned, 
costing $1,070, and the new laundry expenses of $2,462.61, and it 
makes the sum total of expenses incident to the new Hospital fairly 
up to $4,905.38. This expenditure, called for at the very start is not 
a legitimate charge against the running expenses of the new institu- 
tion. I mention the details in this report simply as a matter of official 
record. The removal of chronic patients from the old to the new 
Hospital afforded us an opportunity, long sought for, to vacate and 
thoroughly renovate some of the wards that have been constantly 
overcrowded during the past fourteen years. This work was efficiently 
done by removing and replacing soiled and disfigured walls, worn out 
floors and crumbling ceilings. The new work has been thoroughly 
finished in two coats of English silicate paint which is hard, durable 
and impervious to moisture. We have, as in former years, endeav- 
ored to make good throughout the entire house, the wear and tear 
incident to the care of a destructive population. The same spirit has 
governed the management of the Hospital Farm and gardens. Old 
walls have been replaced by new fences; brush and stones have been re- 
moved and several fields drained and improved so as to be considered 
profitable farming land. For details of the agricultural results you 
are referred to the accompanying Farmer's Report. It shows not 
only an increase in the quantity produced, but also an improvement 
in the quality. A larger number of patients have been employed out 
of doors than ever before; and I think I may safely report progress in 
all departments of the work assigned to us. 



17 

FINANCIAL STATEMEN I . 

The customary Balance Sheet and Abstract of Vouchers, classified 
under specific heads are herewith transmitted. These show in detail, 
the amount of revenue and how expended. For the first time in its 
history, the Hospital expenses have apparently exceeded its revenue by 
$1,795.56. This apparent deficit is more than offset by the possession 
of coal and other supplies at this date, costing far more than the sum 
named. It should be remembered that the new Hospital building came 
into your possession destitute of supplies or funds for operating expenses. 
A number of details in the construction were found to be imperfect. 
It was necessary to employ several mechanics at considerable expense 
to complete and perfect absolutely needed improvements before the 
building could be most conveniently adapted to its purposes. In 
addition to this, various fixtures not included in the contract for fur- 
nishing, had to be purchased before it was in complete running 
order. As a doubt had arisen in the minds of some of the officers 
respecting the capacity of the two boilers to furnish sufficient heat for 
the new building during extremely cold weather, a contract was made 
for an additional boiler to supplement the others, or in case of re- 
pairs. All of these items which you understand in detail, combine 
to make our Financial Report less favorable than in previous years. 
It is known that there has been a large advance in the price of nearly 
all provisions during the past eight months. Notwithstanding these 
unexpected contingencies, we have been able to make improvements, 
organize the new Hospital and purchase and pay for the fuel required. 

I sincerely hope that the application to the General Assembly which 
you propose to make for the land south of the Hospital, will receive 
favorable action. 

The new buildings extend to the boundary line. There is not 
even room for a passage way. No argument is needed to show why 
the Hospital should control the land surrounding the building occu- 
pied by insane female patients. A due regard to privacy requires 
this purchase. The land is valuable for garden purposes, and can 
be worked most advantageously. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 

We are again under obligations to many friends who have thought- 
fully remembered this Institution by making donations of useful 
articles or in assisting in our series of entertainments. In behalf of 
those who cannot speak for themselves, I would in this public man- 



18 

ner return grateful acknowledgments to Mrs. E. B. Monroe, of South- 
port, for books and magazines, lambrequin curtains, and twenty-five 
dollars in cash to be expended in books for the new Hospital; to 
Miss M. G. Perry, of Southport, for books and magazines; to H. D. 
A. Ward, of Middletown, for six volumes of illustrated German 
papers, eight volumes of Scribners Monthly, five volumes of Apple- 
ions Monthly, one bound volume of Galaxy and twenty-five sermons 
of Henry Ward Beecher: to W. W. Coe, Esq., of Portland, for 
several volumes of the Spirit of the Times; to E. Rockwell, of Mid- 
dletown, for packages of pictorial papers; to Miss Amelia Glover, 
Middletown, for packages of books; to Mr. C. W. Church, for two 
volumes Atlantic Monthly, two volumes Appletons Monthly; to T. S. 
Gold, Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture, one volume of the 
Annual Report; to Senator Joseph R. Hawley, one volume of the 
last Annual Report of the Agricultural Department at Washington; 
to B. P. Starr, of Hartford, two bound volumes of Every Saturday; 
to Mr. John Barber, New Haven, for one volume; to W. W. An- 
Y drews, of Rockville, 200 Mammoth "Cluster'' raspberry vines; to 

John N. Stickney, Esq., of Rockville for a lecture; to Rev. 
A. W. Hazen, for a lecture; to the Earnest Workers of the South 
Congregational Church, for a pleasant dramatic entertainment; 
to Hon. Lewis E. Stanton, Hartford, for an interesting lecture, enti- 
tled " Work and Play;" to the officers and attendants of the Hartford 
Retreat, for a musical entertainment; to Messrs. Camp, Pearne, and 
eighteen others fora concert; to Miss MaryBeeman, Miss Rose Newell, 
Mrs. Post, and Mrs. Bronson, and Messrs. Pearne, Hall, Bacon and 
Parsons, for an afternoon concert; to Mrs. Edna Chaffee Noble, for 
a reading; to a friend, for ten copies of the Parish Visitor; and to 
many others who have kindly placed magazines and newspapers in 
the Hospital box at Mr. Hastings' store, for the use of the patients ; 
also to the publishers of the following named State papers for 
gratuitous copies: 

The Courant, Daily, Hartford. 

The Post, 

The Register, " New Haven. 

The Palladium, weekly, " 

The Times, " Hartford. 

Bridgeport Standard, weekly Bridgeport. 

Tolla?id County Journal, weekly, Rockville. 

Sheltering Arms, monthly, New York. 

Conn. Western Weekly, weekly, Salisbury. 

The Constitution, " Middletown. 



Sentinel and Witness, weekly, Middletown. 

Religious Herald, " Hartford. 

Weekly Witness, " v York. 

Sabbath Reading, 

1 am under obligations to the friends who have kindly aided us in 
our endeavors to provide suitable entertainments and amusements 
during the winter months. The importance of this work is evident 
to any thoughtful person. Hospital life at its best must be somewhat 
irksome to those who have been accustomed to active pursuits. The 
tedious monotony is pleasantly broken in the summer by out-door 
employment for those who are able, together with pleasant ga: 
exercise in walking, in drilling, and the various means that are easily 
found while passing time out of doors. Since the improvement of 
our lawn and the rapid growth of plants and flowers, the surround- 
ings have been so attractive that not only our own people but those 
from the city and surrounding country are often seen walking and 
driving about the buildings. To add to the pleasure of those who 
are thus employed, the Hospital Band has spent from one to two 
hours practicing every morning near the south arbor, and on two 
evenings of each week at the ladies' arbor. The following entertain- 
ments were provided in the Amusement Hall and Chapel during the 
winter season: 



Sociable, with dancing, ----- 

Masquerade Party, ------ 

Lectures with Stereopticon, - 

Christmas Tree, 

Legerdemain, E. A. Parsons, - 
Dramatic Entertainment, Hospital Troupe, 
" Earnest Workers, 

Comedy and Farce, Middletown Friends, - 
Musical Concert, Retreat Orchestra, - 
Concert, Middletown Friends, - 
Reading and Concert, Miss Annie L. White, 

Miss L. L. Peck, ----- 

Mrs. Dr. Lyon, ----- 

Mrs. Edna Chaffee Noble, - • - 
Lecture, The Wheat-fields of Dakotah, Rev. Dr. 
W. L. Gage, ----- 

Horse-back ride through Syria, Rev. C. 
H. Buck, ------ 

The Sandwich Islands, Dr. Shew, 
Healthy Homes, Dr. C. W. Chamberlin, 
Switzerland, Rev. A. W. Hazen, - 



evenincrs. 



Lecture, Palestine, or the Holy Land, John N. 

Stickney, i evening. 

" Work and Play, Lewis E. Stanton, Esq., i " 
Sleighing Party, I afternoon, conveyances from 

public and private stables. 
Band Concerts, 34 " 

CHANGES IN THE OFFICIAL STAFF. 

In March last, Mr. Clinton W. Weatherbee resigned the position 
of Farmer, which he had faithfully and most acceptably filled since 
April, 1868, to engage in private business. At the same time Mrs. 
Weatherbee resigned the position of Housekeeper. Both of these 
officers possessed rare executive ability, and were well fitted to per- 
form the duties of their respective offices. These vacancies were 
filled respectively by the appointment of Mr. Pliny W. Sanderson 
and Mrs. Jeannette P. Packer. At the opening of the new Hospital 
Dr. Henry S. Noble, of Hartford, formerly connected with one 
of the Michigan Asylums, and more recently an assistant at the 
Retreat, was appointed Assistant Physician, and Mrs. Annie L. Wil- 
liams, Housekeeper. With these exceptions, the staff of officers 
remains the same as at the beginning of the year. I am under deep 
obligations to all my co-laborers, who have faithfully performed the 
duties of their several positions. And especially am I encouraged 
and sustained by the fostering care which you have steadily bestowed 
on this great public trust. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. M. Shew, M. D., 

Superintendent. 
December 1, 1881. 



91 



Farmers Report 



T: the Superintendent : 



QUANTITY AND VALUE OF PRODUCTS. 



Hay, - 


- 


163 


tons, 


Corn Fodder, 


- 


30 


i 1 


Straw, - 


- 


12 


1 1 


Rye, - - 


- 


107 


bushels, 


Potatoes, 


- 


2,009 


< « 


Carrots, 


- 


104 


1 1 


Bee ft, - 


- 


106 


i t 


Spinach, 


- 


181 


1 1 


Beet Greens, - 


- 


2 34 


< c 


Beet, — Mangold-Wurzels, 


251 


1 1 


Onions, 


- 


198 


1 1 


Turnips, 


- 


276 


1 ( 


Beans, (String), 


- 


73 J A 


c I 


Beans Pole, (in 


shell), - 


194 


« ( 


Peas, (in shell), 


- 


192 


< I 


Parsnips, 


- 


1 12 


c t 


Sweet Corn, - 


- 


332}4 


t ( 


Cucumbers, - 


- 


141^ 


< 1 


Tomatoes, 


- 


255 


C { 


Summer Squash 




266 


t < 


Winter Squash, 


. . - 


7,3 6 ° 


pounds, 


Lettuce, 


- 


5.350 


heads, 


Pie Plant, - 


- 


905 


pounds, 


Parsley, 


- 


108 


bunches 


Melons, 


- 


7,025 


pounds, 


Cabbages, 


- 


4,352 


heads, 



- $3,749 00 

450 00 

216 00 

96 00 

- 1,808 10 

3 6 40 

42 40 

126 70 

140 40 

87 85 

198 00 
82 80 

73 50 

232 80 

307 20 

50 40 

182 87 

106 12 
153 00 

199 50 
147 20 

107 00 
18 10 

5 40 
140 50 
304 64 



c 22 



Radishes, 


- 


20 


bushels, - 


$20 00 


Cauliflower, - 


- 


- 125 


heads, 


• " 18 75 


Celery, - 


- 


- 3.500 


heads, 


140 OO 


Asparagus, 


- 


- 118 


pounds, - 


12 90 


Strawberries, - 


- 


- 2,019 


quarts, 


• . - 302 85 


Currants, 


- 


*Va 


bushels, - 


• - 5 50 


Pears, - 


- 


15 


t e 


15 00 


Apples, - 


- 


21 


( ( 


21 00 


Milk, (grass-fed), 


- 


-49,671 


quarts, 


- 2,483 55 


Beef, - 


- 


- 4,002 


pounds, - 


300 15 


Veal, - 


- 


- ^77 


( 1 


27 70 


Pork, - 


- 


-12,878 


t i 


- 1,030 24 


Pigs, (sold), - 


- 


78 


- 


274 25 


Calves, (sold), 


- 


J 5 


- 


22 50 


Calf-skins, (sold), 


- 


3 


- 


4 5° 


Chickens, 


- 


364 


pounds, - 


72 80 


Eggs, - 


- 


- 616^ 


dozen, 


135 63 


Field Corn, (on ear), 


- 595^ 


bushels, - 


297 75 


Beans, (Dry), 


- 


14 


11 


28 00 


Ensilage, 


- 


70 


tons, 


350 00 



Total, 



$14,624 95 



The farm stock consists of twelve horses, six working oxen, one 
bull, forty-one cows, two two-years-old, two yearlings, two calves, 
twenty-three fat hogs, twenty-eight breeding sows, fifty shotes, two 
boars, and one hundred and fifty-hens. 

P. W. Sanderson, 

Farmer. 



TABLE /. 

MOVEMENT OF THE POPULATION. 





Males. 




CotaL 


Number at the beginning of the jrear, - 


251 


278 


529 


Admitted in the year, - 


193 


159 




Total present in the year, - 


in 


i:;7 


881 


Discharged, — Recovered, - 




20 


53 


Improved, - 


16 


l 


20 


Stationary, 


28 


5 


33 


Died, ... . 




12 


11 


duiug at the end of the year, 




396 


731 


tge present during the year, - 


293.17 


315.39 


608.51 



TABLE IT. 

ADMISSIONS AND DISCHARGES FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE 

HOSPITAL. 



Admitted, - 

Discharged, — Recovered, 
Improved, 
Stationary, 
Died, 



Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


1307 


1026 


2333 


278 


180 


458 


221 


168 




231 


148 


379 


241 


135 





! 



Average Number Present Each Year from the Beginning. 






Females. Total. 



1868 I ... 
70, 

1870 71, ... 

1871 72, 

1872 73, ... 

1873 74, 

1-71 " ... 
1875 76, 

kpril 1-t to Nov. 30th 

77. ... 

1-77 78 ... 

1-7- " ... 

1879 - ... 

81, ... 





6.12 


B5.47 




114.54 


225.17 


115 '-7 


117.72 




124.21 


11-. 11 


242 


132 11 


132.43 


264 54 




193 




198 54 


227.19 


125 




227 02 


IV 








231 15 


. i:; 


38 


236.11 


g 06 


171 17 


■1 1 1 :,7 


1 76 








51 i 


293.17 


315 


9.51 



2Jf 
TABLE III. 

NUMBER AT EACH AGE WHEN ADMITTED DURING THE YEAR. 





"When Admitted. 


When Attacked. 


AGE. 




















Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Under 15, - 








6 


1 


7 


15 to 20, - 


9 


1 


10 


10 


7 


17 


20 to 25, - 


22 


19 


41 


24 


22 


46 


25 to 30, - 


22 


18 


40 


19 


20 


39 


30 to 35, - 


25 


21 


46 


20 


29 


49 


35 to 40, - 


26 


19 


45 


23 


18 


41 


40 to 45, - 


15 


21 


36 


11 


18 


29 


45 to 50, - 


14 


17 


31 


11 


12 


23 


50 to 60, - 


26 


23 


49 


19 


17 


36 


60 to 70, - 


22 


13 


35 


17 


10 


27 


70 to 80, - . - 


8 


5 


13 


9 


2 


11 


80 and over, 


3 


2 


5 


1 


1 


2 


Unknown, 


1 


— 


1 


23 


2 25 


Not insane, 


— 


1 — 


— 


— 


— — 


Total, 


193 


159 


352 


193 


159 


352 



TABLE IV. 

NUMBER AT EACH AGE FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE HOSPITAL. 





■ 
When Admitted. 


When Attacked. 


AGE. 


























Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Under 15, - 


6 


2 


8 


36 


11 


47 


15 to 20, - 


57 


34 


91 


98 


67 


165 


20 to 25, - 


154 


115 


269 


175 


147 


322 


25 to 30, - 


177 


121 


298 


! 166 


169 


335 


30 to 35, - 


167 


136 


303 


166 


136 


302 


35 to 40, - 


169 


136 


305 


\ 138 


139 


277 


40 to 45, - 


127 


122 


249 


102 


98 


200 


45 to 50, - 


117 


109 


226 


96 


83 


179 


50 to 60, - 


159 


125 


284 


127 


96 


223 


60 to 70, - 


102 


80 


182 


90 


35 


125 


70 to 80, - 


42 


22 


64 


24 


14 


38 


80 and over, 


10 


13 


23 


5 


7 


12 


Unknown, 


4 


8 


12 


65 


20 


85 


Not insane, 


16 


3 


19 


19 


4 


23 


Total, 


1307 


1026 


2333 


1307 


1026 


2333 



TABLE }'. 

N \1I\ I I V OF PATIENTS ADMITTED. 





Within the Y 


From the Beginning. 


NATIVITY. 












Males. 


Females. Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Connecticut, - 




72 


171 


744 


475 


1219 


York, 


in 


i\ 


it; 


71 


53 


127 


ichnsetts, 


9 


1 


in 


:57 


15 


52 


Maine, - 


— 




— ! 


4 


2 


<; 


Rhode Island, - 


2 


2 


4 


17 


12 


29 


Pennsylvania, - 


1 


1 


2 


6 


1 


7 


^ irgiuia, - 


■ — 


3 


3 


:! 


6 


:» 


New Hampshire, 


— 


— 


— 


1 




1 


Vermont, 


— 


— 


— 


1 


3 


7 


North Carolina, 


1 


— 1 


5 


— 


5 


Now Jersey, 


4 


— \ 


- 


2 


in 


Florida, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 





1 


Louisiana, 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


Maryland, 


— 


— 


2 


1 


3 


Michigan, 


— 


— 


1 




1 


Ohio, 


. — 




— 


— - 


1 


1 


Georgia, - 


— 




- 


— 


1 


1 


South Carolina. 


. — 


— — 


1 


— 


1 


Canada, Dominion of 


5 


— 


5 


1.", 


2 


17 


Austria, - 


— 


1 


1 


. — 


2 


2 


France, - 


— 


— 


— 


3 


1 


4 


Germany, 


6 


( .i 


15 


52 


49 


101 


England, - 


8 


4 


12 


45 


28 


73 


Ireland, - 


4:5 


57 


100 


245 


319 


594 


Scotland, - 


— 


1 


1 


8 


9 


J7 


Italy, 


— 






2 


3 


5 


Cuba, 





— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


Switzerland, 


2 


— 


2 


6 


— 


r, 


Sweden, - - - 


:; 


2 


5 


12 


3 


15 


Bermuda, 








— 


1 


— 


1 


Norway, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Unknown, 


— 


~T-,u~ 


352 


9 
1307 


4 


13 


Total, - 


193 


1026 


2333 



TABLE VI. 

RESIDENCE OF PATIENTS ADMITTED. 





Within the Year. 


From the Beginning. 


RESIDENCE. 










.Males. 


Females. 




Total. 

6 


Mai. B. 
hi) 


Females. 
18 


Total. 


State at Large, 


6 


98 


Hartford Count v, 


10 


1! 


84 


2m; 


215 


54 ' 1 


New Hayen, " 


65 


■ >< 


122 


323 


313 




New London, " 


20 


u 


34 


137 


120 




Windham, 


5 


6 


11 


30 




72 


Litchfield, 


9 


it 


IS 


64 


7' 


143 


Middlesex, " 


22 


7 


29 


146 


88 




Tolland, 


4 


8 


12 


34 






Fairfield, 




11 


36 


191 


119 


310 


Elsewhere, 




159 


352 


10 
1307 


2 
1026 


12 


Total, - 


; 193 


2333 



TABLE VII. 
OCCUPATION OF THOSE ADMITTED. 





Within the Year. 


From the Beginning. 


OCCUPATION. 


02 


•A < 


3 


i 

'aj 


CO 

'3 


'c3 




Is 


a 


o 


la 


a 


"0 




i 


H 


% 


Eh 


H 


Accountants, - 


2 




2 


14 




14 


Actresses, - 


— 





— 


— 


1 


1 


Agents, 


3 





3 


9 


— 


9 


Artists, 


— 





— 


1 


1 


2 


Bakers, 








1 


— 


1 


Barbers, 


— 





— 


4 


— 


4 


Bar Tenders, - 


— 





- — 


2 


■ — ■ 


2 


Blacksmiths, - 


3 





3 


15 


— 


15 


Boiler Makers, - 


— 





— 


3 


— 


3 


Book Binders, ... - 


— 





— 


1 


1 


2 


Brewers, - 


— 





— 


1 


— 


1 


Brokers, 






— 


1 


— 


1 


Brush Makers, - 


— 





— 


2 


— 


2 


Batchers, 


2 





2 


6 


— 


6 


Cabinet Makers, - 


— 


— 


— 


8 


— 


8 


Carmen, 








2 


— 


2 


Carpenters, 


3 





3 


36 


— 


36 


Carriage Makers, - - - - 


— 





— 


6 


— 


6 


Chemists, 








1 


— 


1 


Cigar Makers, - 


1 





1 


8 


— 


8 


Clerks, -.""-"" 


2 





2 


30 


1 


31 


Clergymen, - - - - 


1 





1 


2 


— 


2 


Clock Makers, - - - - 


— 





— 


1 


— 


1 


Coachmen, 


2 





2 


6 


— 


6 


Commercial Travelers, 








7 


— 


7 


Coopers, - 


— 





— 


2 




2 


Curriers, - 


— 





i 


4 




4 


Cutlers, 


— 







2 


— 


2 


Domestics, - 


— 


28 


28 


— 


210 


210 


Draw Bridge Tenders, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Druggists, 








7 




7 


Dyers, 


— 


— 


— 


4 




4 


Eiectro Platers, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 




1 


Engineers, 








3 




3 


Factory Employes, - 


22 


10 


32 


74 


52 


126 


Farmers, - 


27 


— 


27 


262 


— 


262 


Fish Hook Makers, - 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Fishermen, - 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


Gardeners, ------ 


4 


— 


4 


9 


— ■ 


9 


Glass Cutters, 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Gun Smiths, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Harness Makers, - - - - 


1 


— 


1 


10 


— 


10 


Hatters, - 


1 


— 


1 


9 


1 


10 


Hostlers, ----- 


2 


— 


2 


11 


— 


11 


Housekeepers, - 


— 


20 


20 


— 


76 


76 


Housewives, - - - - 


— 


62 


62 


— 


399 


399 


Janitors, 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 



TA BLE VII. Continued, 

OCCUPATION OF THOSE ADMITTED. 





Within the Year. 


From the l'« ginning. 


OCCUPATION 


i 


1 


d 


i 




-' 




2 


g 


o 


3 


J 







P! 


H 


fl 


Eh 


Jewelers, ----- 


1 





1 


3 





3 


Laborers, 


35 


— 


36 


226 


— 


226 


Landlords, 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


Lawyers, ----- 


— 


— 


— 


9 


— 


•j 


Lumbermen, . . . 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Machinists, ----- 


1 


— 


1 


43 


— 


43 


Manufacturers, - 


4 


— 


4 


19 


— 


19 


Masons, - 


3 


— 


3 


15 




16 


Mattress Makers, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 




1 


Mechanics, 


13 


— 


13 


88 





88 


Merchants, - - - - - 


8 


— 


8 


49 


— 


,: : 


Millers, 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


•i 


Milliners, ----- 


— 


1 


1 


— 


2 


2 


Moulders, 


— 


— 


— 


6 


_ 6 





1 


— 


1 


3 


— 


3 


Night Watchmen. 


3 


— 


3 


7 


— 


7 


No employment, - - - - 


21 


18 


39 


98 


151 


249 


Painters, 


6 


— 


6 


24 


— 


24 


Paper Makers, - 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


■1 


Peddlers, • - 


— 


— 


— 


5 


1 


6 


Physicians, 


— 


— 


— 


5 


— 


•") 


Pilots, 


— 


— 


— 


3 


— 


3 


Powder Makers, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Printers, ----- 


— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


4 


Pump Makers, ... - 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Qoarrymen, 


— 


— 


— 


16 


— 


16 


Railroad Employes, 


2 


— 


2 


6 


— 


6 


Rubber "Workers, - - - - 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Bailors, - 


a 


— 


2 


18 


— 


18 


Sail Makers, - 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Saloon Keepers, - - - - 


— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


4 


Seamstresses, - 


— 


10 


10 


— 


39 


39 


Soldiers, - . . . . 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Shoe Makers, - 


i 


— 


1 


16 


— 


16 


Students, 


i 


1 


2 


5 




14 


Speculators, 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


; 


Stone Cutters, - 


i 


— 


1 


1 


— 


i 


Tailors, 


— 


— 


— 


8 


6 


14 


Teachers, 


■i 


8 


10 


9 


12 


r,l 


ph Operators, - 


— 


— 


— 


3 


— 


3 


Tinsmiths^ 


— 


— 


— ■ 


5 


— 


5 


Trass Makers, - 


— 


— • 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Unknown, 


:: 




3 


13 


26 




Upholsterers, - 


1 


— 


1 


2 


— 


•j 


Waiters, 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


I 


. 


:: 


1 


\ 


5 


7 


12 


Wire Weavers, - 


— 


— 


— , 


1 


— 


1 


Wood Carvers, - 


1 


— 


1 


:t 


1 


i 


Total 


193 




352 


1307 




2333 



TABLE VIII. 

CIVIL CONDITION OF THOSE ADMITTED. 





Within the Year. 


From the Beginning. 




Males. 


Females. 

73 
63 
23 

159 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Single, 

Married, - 
Widowed, - 
Unknown, - - 


99 
82 
11 

1 


172 

145 

34 

1 


653 

550 

75 

29 


448 

409 

141 

28 


1101 
959 
216 

57 


Total, -.- - 


193 


352 


1307 


1026 


2333 



TABLE IX. 

HOW COMMITTED. 



' 


Within the Year. 


From the Beginning. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 

72 

927 

7 

5 

15 


Total. 


By Friends, - 
Probate Judges, - 
Judges of the Superior Court, 
Governor's Orders, 
Justice or Police Court, 
Order of General Assembly, - 


5 
174 
8 
4 
2 


10 
149 


15 
323 

8 
4 
2 


116 

1048 

67 

40 

35 

1 


188 

1975 

74 

45 

50 

1 


Total, - 


193 


159 


352 


1307 


1026 


2333 



TABLE X. 

HOW SUPPOKTED. 





Within the Year. 


From the Beginning. 




Males. 


Females. 

10 
55 
94 

159 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


By Self or Friends (paying) 
By State and friends (indigent) 
By State and Town (pauper) 
By State alone, - 


5 

59 

121 

8 


15 
114 

215 

8 


118 

356 

739 

94 


70 
348 

589 
19 


88 

704 

1328 

103 


Total, - 


193 


352 


1307 


1026 


2333 



.?9 



TABLE XI. 

FORM OF DISEASE IN THOSE ADMITTED. 





Within the Year. 


From the Beginning. 


FORM OF DISEASE. 
















Males. 


Females. 

20 


Total 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Mania Acute, - 


49 


69 


1 374 


250 


624 


Chronic, ... 


38 


73 


111 


380 


409 


7-'.' 


Epileptic, 


15 


5 


20 


69 


27 


96 


Hysterical, 


— 


1 


1 


— 


2 


9 


Puerperal, 


— 


2 


2 


— 


24 


24 


Suicidal, - 


. — 


— 


— 


4 


5 


9 


Homicidal 


— 





— 


4 


3 


7 


Recurrent, 


3 





3 


17 


19 


36 


Delirium Simple, 


1 


— 


1 


11 


— 


11 


Monomania, - 


— 


— 


— 


15 


4 


19 


Melancholia Acute, 


26 


25 


51 


111 


108 


219 


Chronic, - 


14 


13 


27 


53 


72 


125 


Attonita, - 


2 





2 


6 


2 


8 


General Paresis, - 


7 


— 


7 


34 


1 


35 


Mythomania, - 


10 


— 


10 


67 




70 


Dementia Acute, - 


— 


5 


5 


12 


12 


24 


Chronic, 


18 


9 


27 


61 


47 


108 


Senile, - 


5 


•"j 


10 


29 


25 


54 


Imbecility, - 


5 


1 


(5 


39 


9 


48 


Neurasthenia, 


— 





— 


2 


4 


6 


Not Insane. - 


— 


— 


352 


19 


1026 


19 


Total, - 


193 


159 


1307 


2333 



TA B LE XII. 

CH »M PLICATIONS (OF NERVOUS SYSTEM) IN THOSE ADMITTED. 





Within the Year. 


From the Beginning. 


COMPLICATION'S 
















Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Aphasia, - 








5 





5 


Apoplexy, - 


1 


, 


1 


6 


— 


6 


Chorea, - 











3 


3 


6 


Epilepsy, - - - 


15 


5 


20 


68 


28 


96 


Hemiplegia, ... 


1 





1 


5 


4 


9 


Hysteria, - 





1 


1 





2 


2 


Hereditary Tendency, - 


56 


VI 




309 


240 


549 


Paraplegia, - 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


4 


Paralysis Agitans, 











1 


1 


2 


Lo Hypertrophic Paralysis 












1 


1 


Prog. Muscular Atrophy, 











1 


1 


2 


Spina] Paralysis, - 











1 


— 


1 


without Complications, 


120 


in 


231 


906 


744 
1026 


1650 


ul, 


1'.':; 


l.V.i 


362 


1307 


2333 



30 
TABLE XIII. 

NUMBER OF ATTACKS IN THOSE ADMITTED. 





Within the Year. 


From the Beginning. 




Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


First, ----- 


143 


132 


275 


907 


748 


1655 


Second, - 


10 


16 


26 


140 


126 


266 


Third, - 


5 


7 


12 


41 


49 


90 


Fourth, ... - 


4 


— 


4 


22 


13 


35 


Fifth, 




1 


1 


5 


11 


16 


Sixth, 


1 


1 


2 


4 


5 


9 


Seventh, ... - 


— 


— 


— 


3 


4 


7 


Eighth, . . . . 


1 


1 


2 


1 


4 


5 


Several, - 


2 


— 


2 


40 


17 


57 


Unknown, - - - - 


27 


1 


28 


125 


45 


170 


Not insane, - 


— 


— 


— 


19 


4 


23 


Total, - 


193 


159 


352 


1307 


1026 


2333 



TABLE XIV. 

DURATION OF INSANITY BEFORE ENTRANCE OF THOSE 
ADMITTED. 















• 


Within the Year. 


From the Beginning. 




Males. 


Females. 
14 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Less than 1 month, 


30 


44 


185 


112 


297 


1 to 3 months, - - - 


25 


12 


37 


195 


105 


300 


3 to 6 


15 


14 


29 


120 


85 


205 


6 to 9 


10 


10 


20 


68 


74 


142 


9 to 12 


1 


3 


4 


57 


40 


97 


12 to 18 


10 


12 


22 


67 


76 


143 


18 to 24 


2 


4 


6 


51 


45 


96 


2 to 3 years, - 


19 


17 


36 


116 


94 


210 


3 to 5 « 


16 


19 


35 


103 


106 


209 


5 to 10 " 


19 


24 


43 


103 


111 


214 


10 to 15 " 


10 


13 


23 


51 


47 


98 


15 to 20 " 


5 


8 


13 


24 


35 


59 


20 to 25 " - 


1 


4 


5 


17 


17 


34 


25 to 30 " 


1 





1 


.14 


4 


18 


30 and over, - 


2 


2 


4 


9 


19 


28 


Unknown, - 


27 


3 


30 


108 


52 


160 


Not insane, - - - - 


— 


— 


— 


19 


4 


23 


Total, - - - - 


193 


159 


352 


1307 


1026 


2333 



si 

TABLE XV. 

i;i l . »\ EKED OF THOSE ATTACKED AT THE SEVERAL AGES FROM 
THE BEGINNING. 



AGE. 


Number Recovered. 


Per ( • nt Recovered of Those 
Attacked from the Beginning. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Under 15, - 






15 to 20, - 


15 


17 


32 


15.20 


25.37 


19.39 


20 to 25, - 


18 


32 


80 


27.40 


21.71 


21.11 


25 to 30, - 


39 


30 


69 


23.28 


11.89 


20.89 


30 to 36, - 


38 


26 


61 


22.88 


19.11 


21.19 


36 to 10, - 


43 


22 


65 


31.91 


15.82 


23. 16 


K) to 46, - 


27 


21 


48 


26.47 


21.12 


24.00 


15 to .")0, - 


22 


12 


31 


22.81 


14.45 


18.91 


50 to 60, - 


23 


17 


40 


18.11 


17.70 


L4.08 


60 to 70, - 


19 


3 


22 


21.11 


8.56 


17 60 


70 to 80, - 


3 


— 


3 


12.50 


— 


5 26 


Over 80, - 


1 


~ 


1 
458 


2.00 


~" 


8.33 


Total, 


278 


180 












TABL 


E XV 


'/. 







RECOVERED AFTER VARIOUS DURATIONS OF DISEASE BEFORE 
TREATMENT FROM THE BEGINNING. 



DURATION. 


Number Recovered. 


Per Cent Recovered. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Under 1 month, 


107 


54 


161 


69.00 


69.03 


:,i 20 


1 to 3 mouths, 


79 


41 


120 


40.05 


39 "i 


40.00 


:; to 6 


33 


27 


60 


27.50 


31.76 


29.26 


6 to 9 


16 


17 


33 


23.52 


23.51 


23 23 


9 to 12 


12 


7 


19 


21.05 


17.50 


19 58 


1 to 2 years, 


15 


15 


30 


12.71 


13 22 


12 55 


2 to 3 " 


- 


6 


13 


6.89 


6 3 1 


6 19 


3 to 5 4 « 


6 


7 


13 


5.82 


6.52 


6 22 


5 to ID " 


2 


6 


8 


1.09 


6 in 


3.73 


Over 10 «« 


— 


1 


1 


— 


3.33 


L.09 


Total, 


278 


180 


t> 









32 
TABLE XVII. 

DURATION OF TREATMENT OF THOSE RECOVERED FROM THE 

BEGINNING. 



Number Recovered. 



DURATION. 



Under 1 month, 

1 to 2 months, 

2 to 3 

3 to 6 
6 to 9 
9 to 12 

12 to 18 
18 to 24 

2 to 3 years, 

3 to 5 '« 
Over 5 " 



Total, 



Average duration of all, 



Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


50 


14 


64 


45 


17 


62 


46 


39 


85 


61 


50 


111 


29 


16 


45 


20 


8 


28 


15 


13 


28 


1 


. 8 


9 


4 


4 


8 


6 


9 


15 


1 


2 


3 


278 


180 
8.75 months. 


458 


5.68 months. 


7.14 months. 



TABLE XVIII. 

WHOLE DURATION OF DISEASE OF THOSE RECOVERED FROM 
THE BEGINNING. 





Number Recovered. 


DURATION. 










Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Under 1 month, - 


35 


10 


45 


1 to 2 months, - 


49 


17 


66 


2 to 3 


20 


10 


30 


3 to 6 


59 


37 


96 


6 to 9 


28 


32 


60 


9 to 12 


25 


13 


38 


12 to 18 


21 


15 


36 


18 to 24 


9 


9 


18 


2 to 3 years, - 


13 


14 


27 


3 to 5 " ... - 


13 


10 


23 


Over 5 " 


6 


13 


19 


Total, 


278 


180 


458 


Average duration of all, 


9.09 months. 


14.96 nios. 


11.89 mos. 






TABLE XIX. 

POEM OF DISEASE OP THOSE RECOVERED FRoM THE BEGINNING. 



DISEASE 


Number Recov 


Per Cenl EteooYi 
each Form Admitted 


• 


Males. 


Females. 

88 
30 

1 

1 
13 

6 

2 

3 

1 

3 

28 

4 

— 


Total. 




Females. 


Total. 


Mania, Acute, '• - - - \w~ 
Chronic^ - - 15 

Epileptic, - - ;{ 

H\>nneal, - 

Puerperal, - - — 

Recurrent, - - 5 

Suicidal, - - — 

Delirium Simple, - - 11 

Dementia Acute, - 2 

Monomania, ... 4. 

Methomania, - 31 

Melancholia, Acute, - - :{.'> 

Chronic, - 4 

Neurasthenia, - 1 


256 
45 

4 
1 

13 

11 

2 

11 

5 

5 

34 

63 

8 

1 


14.60 

29.41 

100.00 
16.33 
26.66 
46.20 

31.33 

7.73 

50.00 


31.02 
7.:::; 
:; 70 
50.00 
54.16 
31.57 
40.00 

25.00 

25.00 

100.00 

25.92 

5.55 


5.70 

4.16 

50.00 

54.16 

30.55 
28.56 

100.00 

20.86 

28.78 

6.40 

50.00 


■ d, - 


278 


180 


458 









TABLE XX. 

CAUSE ( EXCITING) OF DISEASE OF THOSE RECOVERED FROM 
THE BEGINNING. 



CAUSE. 


Number Recovered. 


Per Cent Recovered of 
each Class Admitted. 




Males. 
19 


Females. 
15 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Anx. of mind, bus. & otherwise 


34 


22.89 


38.46 


27.86 


Connected with the affections, 


16 


13 


29 


43.24 


17.80 




Connected with the fluctua- 














tions of fortune, 


9 


1 


10 


49.99 






Connected with religion, 


13 


11 


24 


43.33 




40.00 


Domestic Difficult Lea, 


— 


■1 


2 


— 


11.76 


8.07 


Epilepsv, ... - 


3 


1 


4 


1.47 


3.70 


1 .25 


Venery, 


4 


— 


4 


26.66 


— 




111 Health, .--- 


31 


43 


74 


•il.lo 


21.07 




Intemperanoe, ... 


83 


9 


92 


13.45 


33.33 


42.20 


Masturbation, ... 


10 


— 


10 


in. i\ 




10.78 


• us Shock, --- 


1 


2 


:; 


16.66 


33.33 




Over-study, - 


1 


a 


3 


14.28 




17.64 


Puerperal, Pregnancy , Ac - 


— 


16 


16 


— 






Scarlet Fever, ... 




1 


1 


— 


50.00 




Tobacco, - 


3 


— 


3 


12.85 


— 


12 85 


Confinement, - 


2 


— 


2 




— 




rwork, - 


2 


6 


8 






14.64 


Unknown, - - - 


Bl 




139 


15 88 


12 97 


1 1 52 


A, - 




180 











34 



TABLE XXI, 



AGES AT DEATH. 








Within the Year. 


From the Beginning. 


AGE. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Under 15, - 






_ 








15 to 20, 


1 




1 


3 


3 


6 


20 to 25, - 


1 




1 


9 


7 


16 


25 to 30, 


2 


1 


3 


15 


13 


28 


30 to 35, 


1 


— 


1 


11 


3 


14 


35 to 40, 


6 


3 


9 


31 


18 


49 


40 to 45, - - - 


2 


— 


2 


24 


10 


34 


45 to 50, 


2 


1 


3 


31 


13 


44 


50 to 60, - 


6 


1 


7 


44 


21 


65 


60 to 70, - 


8 


5 


13 


46 


25 


71 


70 to 80, 


2 


1 


3 


20 


14 


34 


80 to 90, 


1 


— 


1 


6 


6 


12 


Over 90, - - - 




~ 




1 


2 


3 


Total, .... 


32 


12 


44 


241 


135 


376 






35 

TABLE XXII. 

DEATHS AND THE CAUSES. 





Within the Year. 


From the Begi 
liaise. Females. 


ining. 


CAUSE 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Total. 


Atheroma Arterianum, 











i 





1 


Aneurism of Iuterual Carotid, 


— 


— 




— 


1 


1 


Atrophy of Brain, 


— 


— 




— 


1 


1 


Apoplexy. .... 


4 


1 


~5 


21 


6 


26 


Bright's Disease, - 


1 


1 


2 


9 


3 


12 


Cancel of Breast, 


— 


— 




— 


a 


2 


Canoer of Stomach, 


— 


— 




1 


— 


1 


Cancer of Uterus, 


— 


— 




— 


i 


1 


Cancer, Medullary, 


— 


— 




— 


i 


1 


Carbuncle, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Cardiac Hypertrophy, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Cardiac Paralysis, 


— 


— 


— 


— 


i 


1 


Cardiac Thrombosis, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 


i 


2 


Cerebral Softening, 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Cirrhosis of Liver, 


— 


— 


— 


1 


2 


3 


Congestion of Lungs, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


2 


Diarrhtra, - 


— 


— 


— 


3 


3 


6 


Drowning, Accidental, 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


ntery, - - - - 


— 


— 


— 


2 


3 


5 


Epilepsy, - 






2 


8 


8- 


16 


Erysipelas, - 




— 


1 


8 


1 


9 


Fracture of Larynx, 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Fatty Degeneration of Heart, 


— 




1 


— 


1 


1 


_rene of Lungs, 


— 


— 


— 


2 


1 


3 


General Paresis, - 




_ 


7 


29 


1 


30 


Inanition, - 






2 


6 


6 


12 


Injuries from Fall, 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Leucocythit-mia, - 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


Mania, Acute, Exh'n from, - 




— 


2 


•2:5 


10 


33 


Mania, Chronic, " »• 






2 


17 


13 


30 


Melancholia, - 






4 


6 


4 


10 


Meningitis, - 




— 


1 


i 


2 


3 


Nephritis, Acute Desq'tive, - 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


( )s-,itication of Cor. Arteries, 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Osteoarthritis Chronica, 


— 


— 


- 


1 


— 


1 


Phthisis Pulmonalis, 


3 


3 


6 


27 


20 


47 


Pleurisy, - 


— 


— 


— 


4 


1 


5 


Pneumonia, - 


2 


— 


2 


14 


4 


18 


Peritonitis, Chronic, - 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


Pyaemia, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Senility, - 


1 


1 


2 


18 


17 


35 


Septicaemia, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


ik from Injuries, - 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


Strangulation by Food, 


— 


— 


— 


3 


— 




Suicide, - - - 


■4 


1 


5 


9 


6 


16 


Syphilis. - 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Tuberculosis, ... 


— 


— 


— 


1 


3 


4 


Tetanus, .... 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Typhomania, ... 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


Dndetermined, - 


— 


— 


— 


6 


4 


10 


d ion of Gall-Bladder, - 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


1 ferine Hemorrhage, - 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


Violence, - 


— 


— 


— 


■1 


1 




Valvular Disease of Heart. - 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Total, ... - 


32 


12 


H 


241 


135 





36 



TABLE XXIII. 

DURATION OF DISEASE OF THOSE WHO DIED FROM THE 
BEGINNING. 





From Admission into 


• 






DURATION. 


the Hospital. 


From the Attack. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


'Females. 


Total. 


Under 1 month, 


37 


20 


57 


7 


8 


15 


1 to 2 months, - 


20 


12 


32 


10 


4 


14 


2 to 3 


30 


3 


33 


10 


3 


13 


3 to 6 


30 


14 


44 


15 


4 


19 


6 to 9 


20 


6 


26 


16 


5 


21 


9 to 12 


15 


5 


20 


8 


9 


17 


12 to 18 


25 


16 


41 


21 


6 


27 


18 to 24 


5 


5 


10 


22 


7 


29 


2 to 3 years, 


19 


17 


36 


23 


11 


34 


3 to 5 " 


16 


20 


36 


35 


21 


56 


5 to 10 " 


21 


15 


36 


27 


28 


55 


10 to 15 " 


2 


2 


4 


16 


9 


25 


15 to 20 " 


— 





— 


12 


7 


19 


20 to 25 " 


— 




— 


7 


? 


10 


25 to 30 " 


— 




— 


3 


1 


4 


30 to 40 " 


— 


— 


— 


3 


4 


7 


40 to 50 " 


— 


— 


— 


1 


2 


3 


Unknown, 




Months. 


Months. 


5 

Years. 


3 

Years. 


8 




Months. 


Years. 


Average of all, - 


19.05 


27.18 


23,12 


5.38 


6.70 


6.04 



TABLE XXIV. 

REMAINING IX Till: HOSPITAL AT THE END OF THE YEAR. 



AGE. 



Under 15, 

16 to 20, 

•Jot.) -J.",, 
86 to 30, 
30 to 35, 
3.", to 40, 
40 to 45, 
4-", to 50, 
50 to 60, 
60 to 70, 
70 to 80, 
80 to 90, 
Over 90, 

Total, 



1 

7 
•2:5 
38 

•IN 

13 

\.\ 
33 
45 
36 
13 
5 



335 



Males. Females. 



1 
21 
33 
54 
49 
77 
38 
73 
32 
13 

5 



396 



Total. 



1 

8 

44 

71 

102 

92 
120 

71 

lis 
68 
26 
10 



731 



TABLE XXV. 

REMAINING AT END OF THE YEAR— DURATION OF THE DISEASE. 



Since Admission. 



Since the Attack. 



Under 1 month, 

1 to 2 months, 

2 to 3 

3 to 6 
6 to 9 
9 to 12 

12 to 18 
18 to 24 

2 to 3 years, 

3 to 5 
5 to 10 

10 to 15 
15 to 20 
20 to 25 
25 to 30 
30 to 40 
Over 40 
Unknown, 



20 
6 
7 
44 
2:1 
22 
15 
18 
26 
4(i 
70 
44 



8 
12 
21 
71 
15 
in 
32 
14 
38 
38 
79 
58 



28 

18 

28 

115 

38 

32 

47 

32 

64 

78 

149 

102 



Males. Females. Total. Males. 



1 

3 

2 

7 

10 

10 

20 

9 

26 

35 

71 

55 

24 

11 

10 

8 

1 

29 



Females. Total. 





1 

5 

10 

8 

11 

16 

12 

31 

50 

B5 

60 

38 

26 

9 

14 

7 

13 



1 
4 
7 
17 
18 
21 
36 
21 
57 

159 

115 
62 

19 
22 

42 



Total, 



335 



396 



731 



335 



396 



731 



TABLE XXVI. 

REMAINING AT THE END OF THE YEAR.— PROSPECT. 



PROSPECT. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Curable, ------ 

Incurable, ------ 


20 
315 


25 
371 


45 

686 


Total, 


335 


396 


731 



TABLE XXVII. 
ADMISSIONS FROM CAUSES. 



CAUSES. 



Anx'ty of mind, bus. and otherwise, 
Apoplexy, ------ 

Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis, 
Confinement, - - - - 

Congenital, - 

Connected with the affections, - 
Domestic difficulties, - 
Dissipation, - 

Epilepsy, 

Excessive Venery, - - - 
Fluctuations of fortune, - 
Hysteria, 

111 Health, 

Injury to Head, - - - - 
Intemperance, - - - - 
Masturbation, - - - - 
Menopausis, - 
Menstruation, Disorders of- 
Meningitis, Acute, - 
Nervous Shock, - - - - 
Nostalgia, - - - - - 
Not Insane, - 

Old Age, - 
Over Study, - 

Scarlatina, - - - - - 
Typhoid Fever, - - - - 
Opium Habit, - 
Over Work, - 

Partial Insolation, - 
Puerperal, State and Pregnancy, 

Religion, 

Syphilis, 

Tobacco, - 

Tuberculosis, - - - - 
Uterine Disease, - 
Unknown, 

Total, 



Within the Year. 


From the Begi 


00 


to 

a 


3 

o 
H 


1 


02 

a 


ii 


6 


17 


83 


39 


i 





1 


11 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


i 


— 


1 


6 

1 

37 


2 
73 


5 


23 


28 


1 


10 


11 


6 


17 


1 


2 


3 


1 


3 


15 


5 


20 


67 


27 


3 


— 


3 


15 


— 


3 


1 


4 


19 


6 





1 


1 


— 


2 


11 


10 


21 


127 


204 


7 


1 


8 


18 


2 


29 


6 


35 


191 


27 


3 


1 


4 


82 


9 


_ 


3 


3 


— 


8 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 
2 
6 


_ 








6 


2 


— 


2 


2 


3 





_ 


— 


19 


4 


5 


4 


9 


15 


18 


1 


1 


2 


7 


10 




1 




1 


2 


. — - 


1 




4 


3 





1 




— 


1 


6 


5 


11 


29 


26 


1 


— 




6 


— 


— 


4 


4 


— 


41 


1 


5 


6 


30 
6 

7 
1 


30 


— 


4 


4 


11 


86 


62 


148 


510 


447 


193 


159 


352 


1307 


1026 



122 
12 

1 

6 

3 

110 

23 

4 
94 
15 
25 

2 

331 

20 

218 

91 

8 

1 

2 
12 

5 
23 
33 
17 

3 

7 

1 
55 

6 
41 
60 

6 

7 

1 

11 

957 

2333 



34 

z ° 
fa § 

CD O C - 



~ T 
CD P 



I E F 
la 



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I 

fD JS 
IP , 



b 



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Si 

I 



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§ S 

5 F 



ro ro 

© CS "- 1 

- X. Ct 





ro 


t— i t— i 


1 to 


cs 


© os 


i en 


00 


co en 



Year ending 
March 31, 18G9 



to CO 

cc rf- to i-- to 

ksco h co ex) *a 



Year ending 
March 31, 1870. 



to CO 
co © to 



Year ending 
March 31, 1871.] 



to CO 
© ro (-• 
bDCC Ci 



© © rf* o rf^ 



Year ending 
March 31, 1872. 



to CO 

-3 CO tO 

H- CS t— 



Year ending 
March 31, 1873. 



co cn 
co ro co 

Ci — Ci 



«w 



Year ending 
March 31, 1874 



*> © 

CT O CO 

on cs 



to 

t-i to »— 

-3 rf^ O 



Year ending 
March 31, 1875 



►u © 

© •- 1 co 
^ r. M 



Year ending 
March 31, 1876. 



— 91 

r. — 
cs oo 


Cn 


OB CO 


~1 


CT to 


CO 

to 


i-» ro 


X 


cs to 


00 

oc 


to cn 

© CO 


Period ending 
Nov. 30, 1876. 


*. cs 

CS — 
00 CD 


CO 

t— ' 


tO © 


CO 


■-> to 

(^ o 


^ 
^ 


ro ro 


rf^ 


(-> to 
cn cs 


on 
CO 


r. sc 
i— to 


Year ending 
Nov. 30, 1877. 


t^ cs 
oc to 

>- co 


o 


l-" to 

CO -1 


CO 

© 


i-i ro 


o 


i-i ro 

rf» cs 


CO 

to 


>-* to 
to © 


OB 




Year ending 
Nov. 30, 1878. 


o* - 



- — 


1— » 

cc 


>— 
- BC 


oo 


1- to 

«- CO 


CO 


»-> to 

CO 5 


** 


-^ 00 


CO 
CO 


00 ~3 

oo cn 


Year ending 
Not. 30, 1879. 


X — 


CO 

o 


rf- CS 


CO 
~3 


i— ro 

>— cs 


ro 

- 


— :i 


CO 

5 


(0 >— 


t—» 


-q ?i 


Year ending 
Nov. 30, 1880. 


- 1 f 

00 X 

— 5 


— 
— 


H- GO 

tc tc 


OO 

CO 


ro 


10 

o 


i— ' 
- X 


Cn 
CO 


ro co 

© CO 


CO 

to 


Ci cc 
-o c; 


year ending 
N-.v. 90, 1881. 



»-> to CO I-- to CO 

•X — - i 

- — EC J — 3 



M ic oo 
- io cn 

OC ^- 00 



IO 
>— 10 Eti 
X - i US 



gg Total. 

09 ^1 I 












4 






to 

*"» . 
~^ . 



40 



TABLE XXIX. 



ADMISSIONS AND DISCHARGES.— EATIO PEE CENT. 



Admissions from Causes : 

Anxiety of Mind and Over-study, - 
Apoplexy, ------- 

Connected with the Affections, 
Connected with fluctuations of Fortune, - 
Connected with Eeligion, - 

Epilepsy, ------- 

111 Health, 

Intemperance, ------ 

Masturbation, 

Old Age, 

Puerperal, 

Unknown, ____-- 

Recovered of all Cases Admitted : 
Under one Year, - 
One Year and Over, ----- 
Deaths of all under care, - - - - 
Deaths of average number in Hospital, - 



Within 


From the 


the Year. 


Beginning. 


5.39 


5.95 


.28 


.51 


7.98 


4.24 


1.13 


1.11 


1.70 


2.57 


5.68 


4.00 


5.96 


14.17 


9.94 


9.38 


1.13 


3.94 


2.52 ' 


1.41 


1.13 


1.57 


42.04 


41.02 


26.11 


32.19 


7.88 


9.52 


5.00 


16.11 


7.21 


6.28 



Treasurer's Report, 



The following statement of the fiscal concerns of ' ' The Connecticut 
Hospital for the Insane," for the term commencing December ist, 
1SS0, and ending November 30th, 1S81, is respectfully submitted to 
the Board of Trustees: 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, Dec. ist, 1S80, - - $312 64 

Revenue account from Hospital, - l 37>753 OI 

State appropriation for Hospital ----- 5,000 00 

Amount of temporary loan, .---'- 10,000 00 



$153,065 65 



PAYMENTS. 

Amount of Superintendent's orders, - -144,380 26 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, Nov. 30, 1881, - - 8,685 39 



$i53> o6 5 6 5 



All of which is respectfully submitted, 

M. B. COPELAND, 

Treasurer. 



42 



Superintendent's Financial Report. 











DEBTOR. 






Dec. i, 1880. 


Cash on hand, 


$222 76 




Dec. 1, " 


Balance with Treasurer, - 


312 64 




May 14, 1 88 1. 


Appropriation from State, 


5,000 00 




Sept. 17, ' 


* 


Temporary loan, - 


10,000 00 




Nov. 13, ' 




Revenue for year, - 


137,753 01 


288 41 




iP l 55 






CREDIT. 






Dec. 31, 1880. 


By Vouchers, 


$10,828 42 




Jan. 31, 1881. 






' 


10,391 05 




Feb. 28, ' 








' 


9,052 71 




Mar. 31, ' 








' 


9,178 79 




April so, ' 








' 


8,924 89 




May 31, ' 








' 


7,938 33 




June 30, ' 








' 


13,286 81 




July 31, ' 








' 


11,181 36 




Aug. 31, ' 








' 


18,084 41 




Sept. 30, ' 








' 


18,822 76 




Oct. 31, ■ 








' 


13,436 83 




Nov. 30, ' 








' 


13,422 21 










#111 


548 57 




fl> 1 44 


Nov. 30, 18 


8l. 


Cash on hand, 


_ 


236 72 


< ( i C 4 


( 


B 


alance 


with Treasurer, 


- - - 8 


5°3 I2 



$153,288 41 

$182.27 — Total amount of six orders drawn that have not yet 
reached the Treasurer. 



We hereby certify that we have examined the vouchers and accounts 
of the Hospital, of which the above is an abstract, and find the same 
correct. 

Henry Woodward, 
J. W. Alsop. 



H 
o 


Deccmbc 

January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

August, 
Septembe 
October, 
Novembe 


O 




•i j-i j -1 


H 




M — 


8 




oooo 


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cooo 






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<■ - 




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U)U)UJ0J0JW to to to ^ts> oo _to 


Salaries of Officers 


Oo 


On"^J cn to — 0vOvO"<lvO4»"^| 


and 


cn 


vO ~ On On On Oven OO^J -< CO-^I 


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to cn cn 04^ to Co O Co — Oco 


Pay of Employees. 


*» 


cn-vjvO —no to cn -^J O ►» 0>-< 




H 

cn 


NOjMNwvnMM CO *- 4fi= 


Furniture and 


oo 


VOUV1 *- ^1 cn O^l-^ — ^J cn 


Fixtures. 


4- 


VI 0\hui o* « O ^ OnCO <-" 


Cn 

4*. 


On O 4* O OOOO^N vjui « 4* 




— 4- — cn CO*<l O ^J O NO N» O 




to 


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•-i to ONcn hh « ** « 










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« 


UnOnO *• N O+'yiNO *^r 




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, -'^IN>*0*-C000t0 •~>ON 




cn 


Oo CO — 4*. — OnnO •<! ^J O 4*. 




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£* «» 




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vo 004* 4*. oocn Cnco Oo cn cn 


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Clothing. 


^° 


cn^j COOvCoOcnco 4*0 O vO 


•cn 


to ^q O to CO 4* Co 4* On-vJ COCO 


4- 






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to cn Oo OO^I — O — "<J cn Co cn 




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to 


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Provisions. 


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— i cn to Co cn On to On^-J ^4 cn CO 




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»o0004».OCOOOON004i. 




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4- 


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4*. 4* to cn to CO Ovtoco — 


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* 


CCcn Oco — OtoOcoOcnto 


pc 






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4* 


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4* 




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tj- mcofOi^fON't Ono rr no 



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NO i-i ON rj- CO Tf CO NO NO Tt" LO ON 

co' co co co' co to (-" o rf- I-* iono' 

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■r|- CO M CO LO-^-NO ^ CO CO tOCO 



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« £ a3 * PiJ5 53 s ^u O 



Appendix 



i . Whenever a patient is sent to the Hospital by the order of the Pro- 
bate Court, the order or warrant, or a copy thereof, by which the person 
is sent, shall be lodged with the Superintendent. 

2. Each patient, before admission, shall be made perfectly clean, and 
be free from vermin, or any contagious or infectious disease. 

3. Each male patient shall be provided with at least two shirts, one 
woolen coat, one woolen vest, one pair woolen pantaloons, two pair new 
socks, one pair new shoes or boots, and one comfortable outside garment. 

Each female patient shall, in addition to a quantity of under-clothing, 
shoes and stockings corresponding to that required for the male patient, 
have one flannel petticoat, two good dresses, one cloak or other good 
outside garment. Extra and better apparel is very desirable for Chapel 
worship and out-of-door's exercise and riding. 

4. In all cases the patient's best clothing should be sent; it will be 
carefully preserved, and only used when deemed necessary for the pur- 
pose above mentioned. Jewelry, and all superfluous articles of dress, 
knives, etc., should be left at home, as they are liable to be lost, and for 
them the officers of the Hospital are not responsible. 

5. A written history of the case should be sent with the patient, and, 
if possible, some one acquainted with the individual should accompany 
him to the Hospital, from whom minute, but often essential, particulars 
may be learned. 

6. The price of board, including washing, mending and attendance, 
for all who are supported at the public charge, is four dollars per week. 

7. Pauper patients, or those supported partly by the towns in which 
they reside, and partly by the State, are admitted agreeably to Section 
1., Chap. 103, Public Acts, 1878. 

8. Indigent persons, or those possessing little property, and partly 
supported by friends and partly by the State, are admitted under Section 
1, Chap. 103, Public Acts, 1878. 

9. Private patients, or those supported by themselves or their friends, 
are admitted to the Hospital under Section .2, Chap. 103, Public Acts, 
1878. 

10. Visitors are admitted to the Institution between the hours often 
A. M. and twelve, M., and between two and four P. M. on Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays only, but no visitors shall be admitted to the 
Wards occupied by patients without express permission from the Super- 
intendent, and especial care is to be taken that no amount of visiting is 
permitted that might prove injurious to the patients. 



46 

House Bill No. 44. 

CHAPTER CUT. 



An Act concerning Connecticut Hospital for the Insane. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 
Assenibly Convened : 

SEC. 1. When any pauper in any town may be insane, a selectman of 
such town shall apply to the judge of probate of that district wherein said 
pauper resides, for his admission to said hospital; and said judge shall 
appoint a respectable physician, who shall fully investigate the facts of 
the case, and report to said judge, and it such physician shall be satisfied 
that said pauper is insane, the judge shall order such selectman forthwith 
to take such insane pauper to the hospital, where he shall be kept and 
supported so long as may be requisite, and two dollars and fifty cents of 
the expense of his support shall be paid by the town legally chargeable 
with his support, and the balance by the State; and when an indigent 
person, not a pauper, is insane, application maybe made in his behalf to 
the judge of probate for the district where he resides, who shall appoint 
a respectable physician and a selectman of the town where said indigent 
person resides, who shall fully investigate the facts and report to said 
judge, who, if satisfied that such person is indigent and insane, shall 
order him to be taken, by the person making the application, to the hos- 
pital, where he shall be kept and supported as long as ?nay be re- . 
guisite; and half of the expe?ises of his support shall be paid by the 
State, and half by the person making the application ; and when a 
judge shall issue an order for the admission of any pauper or indigent 
person to the hospital, he shall record it, and immediately transmit a 
duplicate to the governor. 

Sec. 2. The trustees may authorize the superintendent to admit 
patients into the hospital, under special agreements, when there are 
vacancies. 

Sec. 3. The price for keeping any pauper or indigent person shall be 
fixed by the trustees, and shall not exceed the sum of four dollars per 
week, and shall be payable quarterly. 

Sec. 4. There shall be taxed monthly, by the comptroller, one dollar 
and fifty cents for each week's board at said hospital, and two dollars 
for each week's board at any other hospital or asylum for the insane, of 
all insane paupers belonging to towns in this State, committed in pur- 
suance of the first section of this act, and two dollars for each week's 
board at said hospital and one-half of the expense of each week's board 
at any other hospital or asylum for the insane of all insane indigent per- 
sons committed in pursuance of said first section of this act; and the 
superintendent of each of said institutions shall make the bill therefor, 
and present it to the governor, upon whose approval it shall be paid from 
the State treasury. 

Sec. 6. This act shall take effect from its passage. 

Approved March 29, 1878. 



Th i vi Le1 h A n n u;i 1 Reporl 



> 



OF THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OF 'I ill. 



{[omtecticut Mate J\cform School, 



AT 



MEIUUEX 



IFOR THE YE^IR, 1881. 



TO THE 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY, JANUARY SESSION, 1882, 




MERIDEN: 
Republican Steam Print. 

1882. 



RUSTEES OF STATE REFORM SCHOOL. 



Uo.\. John L. HOUSTON, Thompsonvllle, 

l'i i:m Expires, • 



CHARLES FABRIQUE 
TERM EXPLBJ - 

VINCENT COLYER, 
Term Expires, 



THEODORE BIRD, 
Term Expire* 



.1. s. LATHROP, 

Term Expires, 



Nkw 11 V\ EN, 



Rowai ["ON, 



V. 0. BENNETT, M 1).. Wii.i.imanim 

Term Expires, 



Bethli III m. 



CHARLES FITZGERALD, Mlddletown, 
Term Expires, 

<;. II. PRESTON, M. 1). Tolland, 

Term Expires, ... 



Norwich, 



ii mm i <>i:i> cm \ n . 
1886. 

New Haven Coi nty. 
L885. 

Fairfield Coun n • 
L882. 

Windham Coin i ^ . 
L882. 

Litchfield Coin i ^ 
1883. 

Middlesex County. 

1883. 

Tolland County. 
L884. 

Ni.w London COUNTY 
1884. 



RESIDENT TRUSTEES. 



Hon. OWEN B. ARNOLD, Meriden, 

Term Expires, 

Col. CHARLES L. I I'll A.M. Mkkidi.n. 
Term Expires, 

Hon. ISAAC C LEWIS, Merlden, 

Term Expires, ■ 



Xkw Haven County. 
1884. 

Ni.w II wi:n ( <>r.\ i r. 
1882. 

Ni.w Haven County. 
1883. 



{ 



> 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



PRESIDENT. 

Hon. JOHN L. HOUSTON. 

SECRETARY. 
Col. CHARLES L. UPHAM. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

(HAS. FITZGERALD, VINCENT COLYER. 

Col. CHARLES L. UPHAM. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

G. II. PRESTON, Hon. OWEN B. ARNOLD. 



COMMITTEE on DISCHARGES. 

Hon. I. c. LEWIS, Coi . CHARLES L. UPHAM, 

Hon. OWEN B. ARNOLD. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

GEORGE K. HOWE. 



( 



> 



Kate el tmnecikut 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES. 



7\> the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut, January 
Session A. D. 1882: 

GENTLEMEN: — The Trustees of the State Reform School here- 
with respectfully present their Thirtieth Annual Report: 

During the past year the Institution has, in our judgment, made 
decided progress towards attaining the object of its establishment, 
as a place for the reformation of vicious and wayward hoys : and 
we are unanimous in our belief that it lias never done more and 
better work in this direction at any former period of its history than 
it is now doing. 

Most of our number were trustees at the time Mr. Howe 
accepted the position of Superintendent, and the contrast between 
then and now in the condition of the Institution generally, the 
methods employed and the results obtained, are such as to warrant 
us in congratulating the people of the State that the Institution is 
now so efficient^ managed. 

The whole number of boys received by the Institution since its 
organization is 3.265 

The number remaining November 30, is 357, which is 50 more 
than at the date of our last report. 

For a detailed statement of the affairs of the Institution, we call 
your attention to the reports of the Superintendent and others, 
which are herewith submitted. 

We especially commend to your notice the facts stated by the 
Superintendent, under the head of " Improvements." and we 
heartily indorse his narration of the working of the family system, 
under which 50 of the boys are now being trained: and we hope 
with' him that this method may in time whollv supplant the congre- 
gate or herding system with its ever-present suggestions of prison 
life and discipline. 

We would also most earnestly call VOur attention to the state- 



) 



8 report op THE trustees [January, 

merits made by the Superintendent, under the head of " Expenses," 

The inmates of this Institution are the wards of the State, and 
the obligations of a guardian certainly involve the providing of 
sufficient food and clothing for those under guardianship, and in our 
opinion, the present weekly allowance is not sufficient for this 
purpose. 

A library of well selected books is an agency directly promotive 
of the objects of this Institution. We now have library and read- 
ing rooms ; but only a very few books. 

We recommend an appropriation of one thousand dollars for this 
purpose. 

The bills for the past year have all been paid, and there remains 
of unexpended resources, $i,iS8. 

The terms of the Trustees from Fairfield and Windham counties 
will expire next July. It will, therefore, be the duty of the Senate 
to fill the vacancies. 

We desire to record our grateful appreciation of the faithful- 
ness and ability with which Mr. and Mrs. Howe, and their 
assistants, in the various departments, have discharged their duties 
during the year which is passed : and we congratulate them and 
ourselves on the harmony which appears to prevail, and on the suc- 
cess which has attended their labors. 

I. C. LEWIS, 
C. L. UPHAM, 
J. S. LATHROP, 
O. B. ARNOLD, 
• J. L. HOUSTON, 

CHARLES FABRIQUE, 
G. H. PRESTON, 
THEODORE BIRD, 
C. FITZGERALD. 

State of Connecticut, j Meriden, Dec. 14, 18S1. 

New Haven, County, j T 

Personally appeared, John L. Houston, Charles Fabrique, Theo- 
dore Bird, J. vS. Lathrop, G. H. Preston, C. L. Upham, and I. 
C. Lewis, and made oath to the truth of the foregoing report. Be- 
fore me, 

O. B. ARNOLD, Notary Public. 



S$2.] OF nil-: STATE RBFOBJI BCHOOL 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Trustees of the Connecticut State Reform School: 

GENTLEMEN : — I herewith present my Annual Report of the Con- 
necticut State Reform School for the year ending November 30th, 

As the agencies best adapted to reformatory work have been some- 
what freely discussed in my former reports to your honorable body, 
it will be my aim in this report to give but little more than the de- 
tails of the past year's transactions of the School. 

The number of boys remaining in the School November 30th, 
1SS0. was 307. The whole number received during the year equals 
196: the number discharged, 146. The whole number that have 
been in the School during the same period, 503, and the number ndw 
in the School. 357. 

It will be seen by these figures that the School has materially in- 
creased in numbers since our last Annual Report, and were it not for 
the fact that we have lately increased the capacity of the Institution 
for taking more boys, we to-day could not receive those for whom 
application is made. In our opinion an Institution with a capacity 
for 500 inmates would no more than reach the wants of the State in 
providing for the class that are in need of restraints such as this 
School provides. 

SANITARY CONDITION' OF THE SCHOOL. 

The health of the Institution has been moderately good during the 
year. Many boys come to us very feeble from inherited debility, 
but a huge- per centage of these even become strong after being in 
the Institution tor a time. Regular hours for sleep, labor, study and 
recreation, together with the opportunity to sit three times a day at 
a tabic cleanly spread and well supplied with good wholesome food. 
are well calculated to produce healthful development in the 

wing boy. It is a well known fact that many of these Lads C 
from the lower walks in life, where, in most instances. thev have 



) 



io report of the trustees [January, 

been strangers to any of its comforts, and have known nothing but 
want and extreme poverty With a body dwarfed and sickly by want 
and exposure, we generally find a mind correspondingly weak. The 
growth of such bodies and such minds, to that degree of development 
that will render them self sustaining when again placed in society 
is generally a slow process, but it is a subject of moment, worthy of 
thought, and one in which all communities are interested. 

For an account of ailments and especial cases of sickness given 
more in detail, we respectfully refer you to the Physician's Report. 

improvements. 

In the last Annual Report we referred to the fact that the previous 
General Assembly had made an appropriation of $25,000 for the 
erection of a church For the School, and a family building for the 
accommodation of fifty boys. Also, that the contracts for the erection 
of the same had been advantageously let. and that the buildings 
were in process of construction. 

Both of the buildings were completed and ready for occupancy in 
the early spring The chapel was dedicated April 13th. and was an 
occasion of much interest. There were present the Board of Trustees, 
several ministers from the various churches, and many interested 
friends. Its occupancy has created a new and much deeper interest 
among the boys in the Sabbath school, and all other religious or 
chapel services. It is a beautiful structure, being essentially Xor- 
man in stvle of architecture, and is admired by all who see it. It 
has a seating capacity, in amphitheatre form, for 500 boys, and has 
a very large platform with side rooms, which enables us to give mus- 
ical rehearsals and other profitable entertainments, always so much 
enjoyed by the boys. A very fine piano has been purchased and 
placed upon the platform, which answers an admirable purpose as 
an aid to the singing on the Sabbath, and in all musical entertain- 
ments that are given from time to time. 

The family building was finished about the first of April. A 
class of fifty boys was soon after selected for this new cottage, and 
language would fail to express the jo\ and happiness manifested by 
them in being transferred from the congregate building to this open, 
free, and beautiful home The building is a model in structure, per- 
fect in every part, and exactly adapted to the use for which it was 
constructed. It is three stories high above the basement, and con- 
tains a beautiful school room sufficiently large for the accommoda- 



i 98a. 01 i H i STATE m i <>i:m S< HOOL. i i 

fcion of fifrj boys, two Bleeping halls, a large basement room for a 
play room in storm} weather, a dining room and kitchen of ample 
proportions, a pleasant shop room, three beautiful rooms for the 
officers and teachers of the family, a room for the boys' Sunday 
clothing, two small rooms for extra bedding, tour water closets and 
bath rooms, a wash room for the bovs. a Furnace room, coal room 
and store room. 

The whole building is warmed 1>\ steam and lighted with gas. The 
boys placed in the building were not selected on account of their 
high standing in school, or for any particular merit, but because they 
were small boys, and seemed entitled to this great favor in preference 
to the larger ones. 

Could the citizens of the State see the improved condition of these 
lads, and the manifest contentment and happiness among them ^ 
compared with those in the congregate department, il would not he 
long till the Institution would be provided with ample means with 
which to build other cottages, that a much larger number might 
share the great benefits to be derived from this more humane and 
natural system, in caring for unfortunate and wayward boys. 

There have been many improvements made upon the main build- 
ing during the year. The unfinished appearance of the exterior of 
the building has been greatly changed and improved by placing a 
frei/.e of panel work and brackets under the cornice of the entire 
front and ends of the building. Four elaborate porches, ten feet in 
width, varying from thirty to forty-five feet in length, have been 
placed over the front entrances of the building. The cupolas have 
been remodeled, and the roof of the building put in good repair 

The dark and unsightly halls in the center of the building have 
been so changed as to make (Hie large and well lighted hall. It is 
finished in hard wood, is well carpeted and furnished, and is to be 
used a- a library room. This improvement, together with the 
change in stair cases, over which the boys enter their sleeping halls, 
has added a convenience, comfort and improved appearance to the 
Institution, worthy of mention. 

Two convenient rooms have been converted into wardrotx 
the boys' Sunda) clothing; floors have been hud and ceili 
renewed in the shop rooms, and the pantries connected w ith the 

officers' kitchen have been remodeled and put in good repair. 

bath room for the North yard has been furnished with most approved 

conveniences for bathing, and the two pla\ rooms have been 



( 

( 



) 



12 report of the trustees [January, 

repainted and supplied with settees, that they may be used as reading, 
rooms by those boys who do not desire to spend their leisure time 
in play upon the yards. 

Seven rooms in the fourth story of the main building have been 
fitted for a hospital. We now have ample accommodations for the 
sick — with the conveniences of closets, convalescent room, and all 
other necessary comforts for the sick chamber. These hospital 
accommodations supply a want long needed, as heretofore we had 
but one room for the sick, which at times, as in case of extreme 
sickness or death, exposed all other patients, and rendered them 
extremely uncomfortable bv the unavoidable contact. 

After the new cottage was erected and finished, it soon became 
evident, from the fact that the boys of the Institution were increas- 
ing in numbers so rapidly, that there was a necessity for building an 
addition to the cottage sufficiently large to provide a kitchen, dining 
room and shop room, for the boys of this new family; hence, at 
the July meeting of the Board, the Local Committee and your 
Superintendent, were instructed to erect such addition as seemed 
necessary to meet the existing wants of this class of fifty boys. 
Upon consultation, it was decided to build a two-story brick addi- 
tion, 24x28 feet, which is now finished and occupied, and gives us 
all the needed room. 

farm and garden. 

The products of the farm and garden have been quite equal to 
former years. The drouth in the latter part of the season shortened 
somewhat those crops that mature late in the Fall. We are still 
raising vegetables for the market in a limited way, but hope to extend 
this department of our labor the coming season. We have a 
ready market for all we can produce, and the labor is of a kind to 
bring health and contentment among the boys. It will be our pur- 
pose in the future to keep only a dozen of first class milch cows, 
and to keep but little of other stock. By enriching the meadow 
lands a much larger yield of hay may be obtained than we have 
been getting, and a less acreage will be required to produce the 
hay necessary to carry the stock through the winter. By this course 
we will have many acres more of desirable land to devote to garden 
purposes. Fifty acres, well tilled as a garden, will not only give 
healthful employment to a large class of boys, but will supply the 
Institution tables bountifully with all the vegetables of the season, 
and yield a satisfactory income from the products that may be sold. 



1SS2.] OF Tin-: STATE REFORM SCHOOL. 13 

For an account of farm ami garden products, more in detail, we 
respectfully refer you to the report of L. 1*. Chamberlain, Esq., 
who lias the genera] supervision of all matters connected with the 

farm. 

SHOPS. 

We now have three shops where eane seating is done, two being 
in the main building, and one at the cottage building. The whole 
number of boys employed in these shops averages about 17^ 
in the winter season. In the summer time there is a less number, 
as the boys are taken from these shops for the farm, garden and 
other out of door work. 

In the manufacturing room, where overalls are made, we employ 
about 90 boys. Seventy-five boys seated at as many sewing ma- 
chines, at active work, with a large class of the little fellows sewing 
on buttons, folding the goods, keeping the records of work, etc., 
makes a pleasant and interesting sight to behold. The boys in this 
department soon become experts at the machines, and a knowledge 
of this manufacturing prepares them to obtain ready employment 
after leaving the school. 

We have a tailor shop, in which 12 boys are employed, in the 
manufacture of the clothing worn by the boys. The mending is 
also done in this shop. 

Only two boys work in the shoe shop. We manufacture but few 
of the shoes worn : but all of the repairing is properly attended to 
in this shop. 

SCHOOLS. 

The schools are thoroughly graded and taught by experienced and 
efficient teachers. The school sessions are about three hours in 
length, and every boy is required to attend regularly. Writing is 
taught four evenings in the week in addition to the regular school 
sessions, and many of the boys become proficient in penmanship. 
One half of the boys attend school in the morning; the other half in 
the afternoon. Notwithstanding the} do not attend school but half 
of each day, still from our perfect classification and thorough in- 
struction, they improve as rapidly as the scholars of any ordinary 
district school. It is a well known fact, that most of these boys are 
very ignorant when received at the School. Many large boys come 
to us who do not know even the alphabet. Such lads must be ed- 
ucated to a certain degree, or it will be difficult for them to attain to 
a permanent reformation. We hold that it is the right, as w ell as 



14 report of the trustees [January, 

the duty of the State, to provide this education for these boys, for 
without it, force, cells, prisons, and all other appliances of penal 
laws are the means, and the State is bound to use them in the pun- 
ishment of its subjects for the violation of law, even if that violation 
is the result of ignorance. 

BRASS BAND. 

Two of the liberal and wealthy citizens of Meriden last Spring 
kindly donated funds for the purchase of a full set of instruments that 
a band might be organized among the boys of the Institution. We 
went to New York and bargained with a firm of known reputation 
for the manufacture of fifteen instruments of the very best make and 
style for the sum of $460. These instruments were placed in the 
hands of fifteen boys about the first of June, since which time they 
have been daily instructed by John Lyon, our superintendent of 
machinery, a gentleman of large experience as teacher of instrument- 
al music, and as a result of this instruction, the boys can now play 
many pieces with an accuracy and skill that would do honor to or- 
ganizations of much greater pretensions. The introduction of in- 
strumental music is a new feature in the Institution, and one that 
will be productive of much good. Thirty boys will soon be placed 
under instruction, from whom recruits can be drawn at any time to 
fill vacancies that may occur in the regular band We now shall 
have music for holidays and all public occasions, and will be able 
from time to time to discourse sweet music from the stand on the 
front lawn, that will not only gratify the boys, but will be pleasant 
for the many neighbors that surround us. 

LIBRARY. 

We now have a room beautifully fitted for a reading room ; but 
the library we have to place in it, is entirely out of proportion to the 
wants of the Institution. Nothing is more appropriate or produc- 
tive of more good for this class of boys, than for them to have access 
to a library of well selected books and periodicals, and we trust 
this much needed want will be met in the near future. 

HOLIDAYS. 

All the legal holidays have been observed in an appropriate man- 
ner, and have been much enjoyed by the boys. Over fifty fine 
roasted turkeys graced their tables on Thanksgiving day, and these, 



1SS2.] o] i in s i \ ii km orm school 1 5 

with the mince pics and a bountiful suppl} of vegetables from our 
own gardens, made it an occasion of especial interest to them. 

On Independence day, in addition to the usual sports of foot- 
ball, fire-crackers, fire-works in the evening, etc., a fine exhibition 
was given in the chapel in the afternoon 1>\ about twent) of the 
boys, consisting of declamations, dialogues and music; all of which 
was \ci\ creditablj presented Those holidays are bright spots in 
Reform School life, and relieve its monotony. No effort is spared 
to make them as pleasant and profitable as is possible. 

DISCHARGED BOYS. 

The di missal of a hoy from the school is a matter of much inter- 
with ns. By our system of grades, a boy that attains his 

•• Honor Badge " is permitted to leave the school on probation, and 
by uniform good conduct, this grade can be reached in one year from 
the time he enters the school. If he lias parents and a home of his 
own to go to. he is generally dismissed to the care of his friends, if 
not. a suitable home is found for him with people who will look 
carefully after his interests. 

In many cases where boys go to their own homes, the} do not 
meet with such influences and surroundings, as are calculated to aid 
them in carrying out any good resolutions they may have adopted 
while at the School. A patient ma\ be cured of a fever; but if 
afterwards he be placed under poisonous and malarial influences, lie 
is liable to become sick again with the same disease, and the relapse 
is even worse than the first attack. A boy m:i\ leave ns to all 
appearances reformed, and prepared to take a place in reputable 
society, but when subjected to the degrading influences of a dissolute 
and wicked home, he soon falls and becomes as bad. or even worse, 
than he was before entering the Institution It is true the Board of 
Trustees has the right, by law. to bind out am bo\ ; but to inden- 
ture the son of sueh parents, would result in his return to them — 
for they would seek him out, and induce him to leave any home in 
which he might be placed. It is this same class of parents that are 
almost daily presenting petitions at the School for the release of 
their s () n>. on the pretense that their services are greatly needed to 
-t in the support of the family, or for some other similar and 
equalh groundless reason. 

We again say, that the months and years of careful training at 
the Reform School, followed by a hopeful reformation and fitness 



16 report of the trustees [January, 

for outside life, calls for much anxiety in regard to the future of 
those discharged. If they could be welcomed by parents or friends 
into good homes, it would be well with them ; but when they return 
to homes destitute of parental care and control, where they are sur- 
rounded by wicked examples and corrupt associations, we can 
expect only disappointments. Our effort and wish has been to so 
place them when they leave us, as to have suitable employment with 
sympathizing friends, with the hope that when so placed, their lives 
would honor the State that turned their erring feet from idle and 
vicious ways. 

EXPENSES. 

It has been a matter of interest with us to keep the expenses of 
the Institution low ; but not in a degree to cripple its usefulness or 
keep the boys in any other than a comfortable condition. A large 
majority of the boys come to us in rags, having nothing on worth 
preserving. Everysuch boy must at once be furnished with two 
suits of clothes, one for Sunday, and one for every day wear ; thus 
incurring an expense of at least $20 upon his entrance to the 
School. Also, every boy that leaves the Institution must be pro- 
vided with a freedom suit that will give him a respectable appear- 
ance when he enters society as a reformed boy. 

The advance in the price of flour, and many other articles of 
consumption, has this season forced us to exercise an economy that 
has not been in keeping with the best interests of the School, and 
we trust that this is a matter that will receive at an early day, due 
consideration by the Legislature. The State assumes to be the 
parent of these boys, to properly feed, clothe, educate, and send 
them away as worthy of public confidence ; and nothing seems more 
fitting than that they should be so cared for while with us, as to cre- 
ate in them high self respect, that they may be well received by the 
better class of the community when they go from under our protec- 
tion. Money expended in making reformatory agencies efficacious, 
is always a good investment, not only for the juvenile delinquent 
himself, but for the Commonwealth that would save him. 

CONCLUSION. 

It is now three and a half years since we assumed the responsible 
duties of Superintendent of your Institution. During the first year 
of our administration but little could be done in the way of improve- 
ments, from the fact that there was no money to devote to such pur- 



OF nil STATE REFORM school. i - 

poses. Subsequent legislation, however, provided means with 
which we have been able to make radical and approved changes in 

the Institution : so much m>. that it now begins t<> assume the pro- 
portions and character of an Institution in which the Slate is war- 
ranted in taking pride. 

Not only have great changes been made in the buildings and their 
surroundings, but the animus and spirit that prompt every effort 
and action of the boys of the .School, have met with equally as great 
a change. In no sense does it appear or seem like the Institution 
of three years ago. The man\ discouragements we earh met with 
have almost entirely disappeared, and the School has attained a 
hold upon the confidence and respect of the people of the State, we 
trust that its merits deserve. 

The improvement made that we regard as of the greatest import- 
ance, and the one in which we take a personal pride, is in the establish- 
ment ot a family of boys on the open or cottage plan. Our long 
experience in a school entirely upon that plan, with a success per- 
haps unknown to any other reformatory in the land, has caused us 
to be deeply wedded to that svstem, knowing as we do, that it pos- 
sesses agencies for success, far superior to the congregate or big 
house plan. In fact the superiority of the svstem over the congre- 
gate is now universally acknowledged by all who have given the 
subject thought, and there is no longer any opposition to the sys- 
tem, emenating from any quarter Worthy of consideration, or from 
any source of intelligence. 

Right here in our own school, the whole question is solved. We 
have a congregate department, in which the boys are as well cared 
for. and exhibit as much happiness and contentment as can be found 
in any similar institution in the country. We also have the 
family school, comfortable and convenient in all of its appoint- 
ments, entirely separate from the other. The boys are equally 
well fed, clothed, and supervised in both departments; but the 
spirit and deportment manifested by the boys of the two depart- 
ments are entirely different. The boys of the cottage are out upon 
open play grounds : their work shop, sleeping halls, dining room 
and school room have no barred windows or bolted doors. Every- 
thing is open and free ; they are not in a prison, but in a well reg- 
ulated and comfortable home, where they have home-like feelings 
and interests They are not seeking freedom, for they already have 
it. They breathe the pure air of heaven, enjoy the invigorating 



i 



J 



18 report of the trustees [January, 

sunlight, their rambles in the open fields, in fact, every contact 
with nature. But for the congregate department, the restraints ot 
walled yards, bolted doors and barred windows, are not agencies 
intended to produce contentment and a home like feeling. The 
boy fails to see any Christian or humanizing light in such agencies, 
and he rebels against them. They are barriers against the deep 
cravings of his nature, and instead oi being factors in his reform, 
they are objects of his hatred, and serve to embitter him. To re- 
form a bad boy, he must be in a comfortable, satisfied and teachable 
frame of mind, and this we contend can be most easily secured by 
surrounding him with natural freedom and Christian home 
influences. 

It is not our purpose to urge the extension of the open system this 
season. We desire hist to have the people of the State see its 
workings, after which, we are confident there will not be the least 
difficulty in procuring all needful appropriations with which to 
build more of these natural homes. It is our earnest desire to have 
the Institution second to none in the country, and one in which 
every citizen of the State can take an honest pride on account of 
the good work done ; and to this end, we feel assured that our efforts 
at the proper time will meet with a response worthy of the cause 
we advocate. 

Our thanks are due to the officers and teachers of the school, for 
their earnest co-operation in the administration of its affairs ; and 
to the Board of Trustees for their manifest confidence, counsel, and 
encouragement in our varied duties, we would, make grateful 
acknowledgment. 

Trusting that Divine blessing may ever rest with the Institution 
in its mission to save the wayward and erring, this report is 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE E. HOWE, Superintendent. 



882. 



"i nil- STATI R r i <>i:\i S< HOOl ■ 



*9 



EXHIBIT No. i. 

kSSlFIED STATBMBN1 OF EXPENDITURES AND RECEIPTS Of THE 
CONNECTICUT STATE REFORM SCHOOL. FOK THE YEAR 
ENDING NOVEMBER 30. 1 88 1. 



EXPENDITURES. 


RECEIPTS 




For Salaries. . $ 


I 2.4(59 61 


Balance on hand Dec 




Clothing, 


3,065 65 


1, 1S80, 


$10,257 58 


Provisions. 


13,12487 


From State Treasurer 


61,115 63 


Freight. 


500 91 


Salaries, . 


5000 


Traveling, 


1 01 26 


Clothing, . 


24 82 


Farm, 


627 42 


Provisions, 


7 80 


Heating and Lights, 


3^7 H 


Freight, 


22 52 


Shoe Shop, 


1.398 21 


Farm, 


1,762 99 


Repairs — General, 


1 .595 2 3 


Heating and Lights. 3 50 


House Furnishing. 


2,250 50 


Shoe Shop. 


3 6o 


Hospital, 


499 °S 


Miscellaneous. 


2 53 48 


Stationer) . 


171 62 


Boarders, . 


38630 


Chapel, 


102 00 


Manuf Shop, . 


4,297 80 


Library. 


393 99 


Green House, . 


307 75 


Returning Escapes, 


9867 


Chair Shop, 


5^975 74 


Returning Boys Home. 25 62 






Postage. 


1 10 88 






Telegraphing, 


55 6l 






Miscellaneous. 


31067 






Water Rent. 


495 26 






Insurance. 


948 00 






Repairs — Special, 


1 2 857 96 






Stable, . 


1 .101 41 






Lewis A\ . Bxten'n 


M35 °° 






Laundry , 


280 80 






Manutactnr'g Shop 


391 82 






Green 1 low 


i?7 '3 






Building Acc't. 


-H-973 3° 






Chair Shop. . 


51 89 






Cash on hand. 


i,i8S 00 






$84,469 51 


$84,469 51 



20 



report of the trustees [January, 

EXHIBIT No. 2. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE SCHOOL, NOV. 30, l88l. 

REsoyncES. 

Cash on hand ...... $i, 18800 

Amount due from State Treasurer, . . 6,019 64 

J. W. Mason & Co , . 381 26 

" " V. Henry Rothschild & Co., 401 98 

$7,990 88 

LIABILITIES. 
Amount due for Salaries, .... $i,Si6 02 

Excess of Resources over Liabilities, 



$6,174 S 9 



V 



EXHIBIT No. 3. 

SHOWING THE WHOLE NUMBER OF BOYS THAT HAVE BEEN INMATES 
OF THE SCHOOL SINCE ITS OPENING IN MARCH, 1 854. 



Whole number since opening, .... 

Number in School Dec. i, 1880, .... 

NUMBER RECEIVED SINCE DEC. I, l88o. 

From Hartford County, 

New Haven County, . 

New London, " 

Fairfield " 

Litchfield " 

Middlesex " 

Tolland " 

Windham " ■ 

Boarders, " 

Number received on old Commitment, 

Total, 
Discharged in various ways, . 



54 
6S 
11 
33 

7 
9 
2 
2 
3 
7 



3 26 5 
307 



— 196 

5°3 
146 



Number remaining in School Nov. 30, 1881 



357 






01 THE S r.\ if 1:1 i hum SCHOOL. 



EXHIBIT No. 


4- 






SHOWING rill IGIOl BOYS AT COMMITMENT. 




AGE. 


PAS! VK\K. 


PRKVTOUSl \ . 


rOTAJ . 


Six 


O 




3 


3 


Seven, .... 


I 




■7 




Eight 


3 




4' 


44 


Nine. .... 


6 




9 1 


97 


Ten, .... 


iS 




3 6 4 


3^ 


Eleven, .... 


'5 




39 6 


411 


Twelve, .... 


34 




491 


5*5 


Thirteen, 


-» 




497 


5 21 


Fourteen, 


■ :/> 




5i9 


555 


Fifteen, .... 


35 




571 


609 


Sixteen, ..... 


l 7 




63 


So 


Seventeen, .... 


o 




9 


9 


Eighteen. .... 


o 




8 


S 


Nineteen. .... 


o 






3 



Total. 



SHOWING FOR 



Theft. . 


49 


Burglary, 


5 


Vagrancy, 


14 


Truancy, 


. 


Stubbornness. . 





Obtaining goods on false 


pretenses, 


Arson. 





Cruelty to Animals. 





Sabbath breaking. 





Malicious mischief, . 


5 


Assault. . 


1 


Assault and battery. 


4 


ich of the peace 


1 


Horse- stealing, 





I Ksorderlj conduct, 





Robbery, 





Trespass, 






IS9 



3076 



EXHIBIT Xo. 5. 

WHAT OFFENSE COMMITTED. 
PAST VF.AK. PREVIOUSLY . 

I7IO 

l6l 
466 

5 1 

iS 

3' 

5 

1 

45 
108 

I" 
17 
1 1 
1 1 

I 
[6 



3 26 5 



TOTAL. 

1759 

I36 

494 



5 

1 

5° 
1 1 1 

So 

1 2 
1 1 

4 
16 



22 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



[January. 



PAST 


YEAR. 


PREVIOUSLY. 


TOTAL. 


Manslaughter. 


O 


I 


I 


Forgers. ..... 


O 


4 


4 


Driving horses without permission. 


4 


22 


26 


Lascivious carriage. . 


O 


2 


2 


Profane cursing, 


o 


4 


4 


Getting on the cars. . 


o 


2 


2 


Abusive language. . . 


o 


r 


1 


Common drunkard. , 


o 


9 


9 


Misdemeanor, .... 


o 


2 


2 


Fornication. 


o 


1 


1 


Breaking windows, . 


o 


8 


8 


Attempt to kill. 


o 


1 


1 


Attempt to commit rape. . 


r 


4 


5 


Rape 


o 


3 


3 


Disobedience. .... 


o 


*5 


'5 


Placing obstructions on railroads. 


o 


1 


1 


Receiving stolen goods. 


o 


1 


1 


Intoxication. .... 


2 


S 


10 


Boarders, 


3 


124 


127 


Incorrigibility. .... 


7° 





70 



Total, 



3076 



3 26 5 



EXHIBIT No. 6. 



SHOWING BY WHAT AUTHORITY COMMITTED. 



) 







PAST YEAR. 


PREVIOUSLY. 


TOTAL. 


Hartford Superior Court, 


O 


36 


36 


New Haven 


u 


O 


72 


72 


Fairfield 


Li. 


O 


64 


64 


Litchfield 


•• 


3 


22 


2 5 


Middlesex 


( ( 





9 


9 


Tolland 


u 





12 


12 


New London 


tt 


1 


H 


15 


Windham 


" 





5 


5 


Hartford Police Court, 


2 4 


4*3 


437 


New London 


It 


h 


68 


7 1 


Norwich 


(( 





97 


97 


Waterbury 




10 


88 


98 


New Britain 


l( 


10 


89 


99 



iSSj. J 



01 i in- STATI RE1 OF \! SCHOOL 



•\ s | V K \ K . 



Bridgeport 


" 




7 


Meriden 


•• 




10 


Stamford 









New Haven 


•• 




39 


Norwalk 


" 




O 


Middletown 






^ 


Justice Court 


various towns. 


74 


Boarders. 


Toti 


il, 


3 




i8q 



'KM IOUS1 N 
lS6 

II. I 



\<)2 

3 

7 
1 160 

124 
3076 



i'»i \i . 

'93 
1 24 

1 

53 1 

3 
1 2 

'234 
137 

3265 



EXHIBIT No 7. 

SHOWING THE VARIOUS WAYS BY WHICH THE 
niK INSTI1 I'l'iox. 
p- 

Placed with Farmers, 

Placed at various trades, 

Sentence expired, 

Returned to parents and friends. 

Sent to Deaf and Dumb Asylum, 

Sent to Hospital. 

Returned to Providence Reform School 

Discharged to go to sea. 

Discharged to enlist in the army, 

Discharged to Selectmen. 

Discharged for defective mittimus. . 

Discharged by order of Court. 

Discharged by Legislature. 

Remanded to alternate sentence. 

Released to be tried for incendiarism. 

ped and not yet returned. 
Died. 
Boarders left. 



HOYS HAVE LEFT 



N K \ k . 


l'KK\ IOUSLY. 


TOTAL. 


9 


353 


362 





29 


29 


34 


900 


934 


89 


1 190 


1279 





1 


1 





4 


4 





1 


1 





2 


1 





26 


26 





1 


1 


5 


9 


'4 





1 1 


1 1 





3 


3 





33 


33 





2 


z 


1 


1 r 5 


nS 


3 


3- 


35 


3 


1 21 


1 - 4 



I 



Total. 



146 



£33 



-'070 



EXHIBIT No. S 

SHOWING BIRTHPLACE 01 rHOSl ADMITTED. 

Connecticut. . 

Pennsylvania, . 



1 46 
3 



H 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



[January, 



r 






New York, 

Massachusetts, 

Maine, 

New Hampshire, 

New Jersey, 

Long Island, 

Rhode Island, 

Maryland, 

Kansas, 

North Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Ireland, 

England, 

Germany, 

Unknown, 

Total, 



EXHIBIT No 9. 

SHOWING NATIONALITY OF THOSE ADMITTED 

American, 

Irish, 

English, 

German, 

Italian, 

Scotch, 

French, 

American (colored) 

Unknown, 

Total, 

Number remaining at present date — white, 
kt " "' " colored, 



3 

4 

2 

_7 
1 S 9 



119 

6 

10 

3 
3 
1 

r 9 

1S9 



3 2 9 

2S 



Total. 



357 



t88a. 



OB THE STATE nil ORM SCHOOL 



>s 



'RINCIPAL TEACHERS REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the Connecticut State Reform School: 

Sir : The report of the school department of this Institution for 
the year ending November 30, 1SS1. is herewith respectfully sub- 
mitted. 



Number of hoys under instruction Dec. 1SS0, 
Number received during the year, 

Whole number under instruction during the year. 
Number discharged during the year. 

Present number under instruction, 



3o7 
196 

5°3 

146 

157 



The scholarship of the hoys when received is shown !>\ the fol 
lowing statements ■ 

Reading. 

Who did not know the alphabet, 

Who could read in first reader, 

second reader. 

third 

fourth 

fifth 



\\ RITING. 



Who could not write at all. 

w rite easj words, 
write letters to friend; 



40 
77 

101 

I" 
25 



357 

[29 
[05 
123 






26 



report of the trustees 
Arithmetic. 



Who knew nothing of arithmetic. 
Who had studied mental arithmetic, 

ciphered through simple rules, 

Geography. 

Who had never studied geography, 
studied " 



[January, 



127 
132 
j8 

357 



19S 
*59 

357 



The following statements show the proficiency m the several 
branches taught of the bovs now in the school. 





Reading. 




Who read in the fifth reader. 


60 


" 


• 4 fourth " 


"3 


u 


third " 


123 


u 


•' second " 


36 


tt 


first " 


25 




Writing. 


357 


Who can write letters to friends, 


202 


u 


i4 easy words, 


98 


U 


print reading lesson. 


57 



357 

16 

49 

30 

i74 

88 

357 

82 

174 

101 

357 
The schools are thoroughly classified, consisting of eight grades. 



Arithmetic. 
Who have studied in denominate numbers. 
" " common fractions, 

u " properties of numbers, 

'* " simple rules, 

•' •• mental arithmetic. 

Geography. 
Who study Swinton's Complete Geography. 

Elementary " 

Who do not study geography. 



<>i nil-: &TA*fl KKiiHiM SCHOOL. 2" 

each presided over by an experienced teacher, We arc well sup- 
plied with the Inst of text books and Other school necessities 

The interest taken and advancement made by main of the boys is 
encouraging, showing that by proper management a mind dormant 
by habit ma\ be awakened t<> the advantages of obtaining an educa- 
tion that will tit its possessor for much usefulness in lite, and enable 
him to transact its ordinary business. 

In addition to the regular school session, we have a writing exer- 
cise tour evenings in the week, and one evening in each week is de- 
voted entirely to instruction in music hv an experienced teacher. 

Trusting that the efforts pnt forth in this important department 
may continue to merit your approval, this report i^ 

Yer\ respectfully submitted. 

II. A. (iRAVES, Principal. 



28 report of the trustees [January, 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Refor??i School: 

Regarding the health of the boys in the School, I beg leave to 
report that it has been satisfactory for the year now closed. 

A few continued fevers of a typho-malarial type, and during a 
part of the year mild inter mi ttents, have required medical care. 

Three deaths have occurred : One, a colored boy, of phthisis, 
of three years standing ; one uraemic congestion of the brain, and 
one of dropsy from valvular disease of the heart, who returned sick 
to the institution as to his home. 

All the boys were vaccinated, or re-vaccinated in the winter, 
during the prevalence of small pox in the town, and fortunately no 
case occurred among the inmates of the Institution. Malarial de- 
bility, very prevalent in the town, affects the School much less than 
would be expected. 

The removal of certain boys to the new cottage has improved 
their sanitary condition, and in consequence, their mental and 
moral vigor. 

The morals of a School is in direct relation to its physical condi- 
tion. Iniquity is seldom born of a full stomach. Neither does pri- 
vation or cruelty promote virtue. 

As the aim of the Institution grows more like that of a family, 
such as children should be born to, with its affection and content- 
ment, regularity and industry, we see arising in full measure, the 
virtues of the family, love and respect, good manners and obedience. 



01 l in STA1 i i;i FORM M HOOL. 

And these promote a general harmon\ of function— or U A health} 
mind in a health) bod) " 

As suggested in a former report, several minor improvements in 
the air supply, and ventilation of the main building, have been made, 
freeing it from the odors of the kitchen, dormitories and closets. 

The. removal of the hospital to the upper rooms, arranged in 

small wards a\sa\ from noise, noisome effluvia, where air and 
Sunlight are tree at all times of day and in all conditions of weather, 
already shows it> advantages in the greater rapidity of recovery and 
ease of management. 

Eloping that the next year may be as this one, but better, I am 
yours, 

G. II. WILSON, M. D., Physician. 

MeriDEN, Conn.. Dec. I, 1SS1. 



3° 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



[January. 



FARMERS REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Trustees : 

The subjoined tables show the amount and estimated value of all 
farm products for the year ending Nov. 30th, 1881 ; also the 
amount of same on hand, together with the inventory of stock and 
tools upon the farm. All of which is respectfully submitted : 

Farm Tools. 
2 Ox carts. - 

2 Ox sleds. - 

1 Field mower, -: 

1 Iron roller, - 

2 Swivel plows, - 

4 PIOWS. ----- 

1 Horse plow, - 
1 Field pulverizer, - 
1 Ox shovel, 
1 Ox scraper, 

1 Seed drill. - 
i Fanning mill, • - 

1 Hay cutter. - 

1 Horse rake. - 

12 Hay forks, - 

12 Hand rakes. - 

8 Manure forks. - 
12 Shovels, 

1 Root cutter, - 

4 Yokes, . . . - 

Grind stone. .... 

Platform scale. - 

Chains, - 

Steelyard, - 

Axes, . _ . . 



P 5° 


00 


20 


00 


50 00 


20 00 


10 00 


30 


00 


5 


00 


8 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


20 00 


5 


00 


*5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


4 


5° 


3 


00 


5 


00 


10 00 


3 


00 


10 00 


12 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 



[882. Ol rHB STATE REFORM SCHOOL. 3 1 

4_ Harrows, .... 

i Disc harrow . 

Picks, 
i j Hoes, 

i, !orn marker. .... 

j Cultivators, ... - 

1 >Baskets, .... 
Dry measures. - 

Quarry tools. .... 

Carpenters' tools, ... - 

Other small tools. - 

$457 56 

Cattle and Swim- . 

1 Pair working oxen, ... $20000 

1 2 Cows, - • - - - 510 00 

3 Yearling heifers, - - - - 60 00 

3 Heifer calves, - - - - 4000 
10 Fat hogs, - - - - 255 00 

4 Breeding sows, - - - - 80 00 
6 Shoats, - - - - 60 00 
(» Pigs, r 25 OO 



$20 00 


»5 


00 


3 


00 


I 


00 


10 00 


15 


(XJ 


3 


(X) 


1 


00 


5 


oc 


IO (X) 


5° 


00 



$1,230 00 



Amount and Value of Farm Products. 

^o Tons of English hay. - - - $900 00 

4 •• Swamp •• - - - 48 00 

1 •• Hungarian hav, - - - 3000 

2 '• Oats •* - - woo 



2 •■ Beddinj 

1 •• Kowen 



20 00 
20 oc; 



3 •• Corn fodder. - - - 30 00 

1 " Rye straw . - - 15 00 
3 •' Oat •• * • - }5 00 
r *• Squashy. - - - 25 00 

2 " Pumpkins. - - - 1000 
950 Bushels of Potatoes. - - - 760 00 
115 •• Stone turnips, - - - 4600 

Fall turnips. - - - jc - 

^34 '• Carrots. - - - 1 1 7 00 



3 2 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



[January, 



no 


Bushe 


Is of Parsnips, 


300 




ti 


Beets, 


5° 




u 


Beets, 


130 




44 


Onions, 


300 




44 


Tomatoes, 


IOO 




u 


Spinach, 


197 




u 


Peas, 


2 5 




14 


Shell beans. 


*5 




44 


String beans. 


20 




41 


Peppers, 


12 




4 4 


Pop corn, 


230 




44 


Sweet corn. 


100 




44 


Oats, 


10 




" 


Rye, 


25 




44 


Cucumbers, 


3° 




44 


Summer squa 


6457 


Pounds of Pork, 


5002 




44 


Beef, 


1214 




44 


Veal, 


Si 




44 


Poultry, 


300 




44 


Broom brush, 


3 2 347 


Quarts of Milk, 


2294 




" 


Strawberries, 


53o 




44 


Raspberries, 


9590 




44 


Cabbages, 


20 




44 


Pigs, 


3 




44 


Calves, 


1500 


Heads 


of Lettuce, 




Radish 


es, 


- 



ishes, 



$88 00 


180 00 


12 50 


130 00 


150 00 


5000 


212 50 


1875 


15 00 


20 00 


18 00 


17250 


5000 


10 00 


15 00 


22 50 


419 70 


3 2 5 ° 6 


8650 


1458 


30 00 


'>6i7 35 


229 40 


79 5o 


479 5° 


105 00 


45 00 


20 00 


10 00 



$6,747 84 



Farm Products on Hand November 30, 1SS1. 
40 Tons of English hay, 



5 


ki 


Swamp " 


1 


44 


Hungarian hay, 


2 


44 


Oats " 


2 


44 


Bedding, " 


3 


44 


Corn fodder, 


1 


44 


Rye straw, 



$800 00 
60 00 
20 00 
30 00 
20 00 
30 00 

15 00 









OP 1 III STATI KM OHM SCHOOL. 



33 





I 


oils ( 


t Oat Straw. 


♦5° 


B 


asheh 


of Potatoes, 


7'? 






. 


So 






Stone turnips. 


5° 






• Fall 








Carrots. 


8o 






Parsnips, 


50 






• Beets, 


60 






. 


15 






Onions, 


5 






Potato onions. 


to 






Pop corn. 


15 






Sweet corn. 


100 






• Oats, 


13 






• Rye. 


300 


Pounds 


of Broom brush. 


ISO 


c 


ibbag 


es, 



$45 


00 


360 00 


' [8 


7> 


40 


CO 


10 00 


5° 


00 


60 


00 


37 50 


18 


00 


'5 


00 


10 


00 


15 


00 


•5 


00 


50 


00 


'3 


00 


30 


00 


12 


00 



$!<774 2 5 

L. P. CHAMBERLAIN, Farmer. 



34 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



[January, 



APPENDIX. 



I 



NAMES, RESIDENCE, COMMISSION, AND RETIREMENTS OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE STATE REFORM SCHOOL, FROM ITS 

COMMENCEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. 



Date of 
Commissioi 


1. 




Date of 
Retirement. 


1851, 


Gideon Welles, 


Hartford, 


'853- 


1S51, 


Philemon Hoadley, 


New Haven, 


1857. 


1851, 


E. S Abernethy. 


Bridgeport, 


■853- 


.851, 


A. N. Baldwin, 


West Milford. 


'855- 


■ 851, 


Philo M. Jackson, 


Norwich, 


declined. 


1851, 


ErastusLester, 


Plainfield, 


1854. 


1S51, 


Henry D. Smith. 


Middletown, 


■853- 


185.. 


John H. Brockwav. 


Ellington, 


1852. 


1853, 


Phjllip Ripley, 


Hartford, died 


in office, 1863. 


'853. 


David Patchen, 


Weston, 


1854. 


1853- 


John P. Gulliver. 


Norwich, 


1854. 


■853, 


John S. Yeomans, 


Columbia, 


1856. 


'853, 


James Phelps, 


Essex, 


'855- 


1854, 


P'red S. Wildman, 


Danbury. 


'858. 


.854, 


Moses Pierce, 


Norwich, 


1856. 


1854, 


John Gallup (2d), 


Brooklyn. 


■858. 


'855, 


Sylvester Spencer, 


Litchfield, 


resigned, 1858. 


'855- 


Elihu Spencer, 


Middletown, 


declined. 


1856, 


Moses Culver, 


Middletown, 


1858. 


1856, 


Thomas Clark, 


Coventry, 


i860. 


1856, 


W. P. Benjamin, 


New London, 


18J6. 


■857. 


W. S. Charnley. 


New Haven, 


declined. 


1858, 


E. W. Hatch, 


Meriden. 


resigned, 1859. 


1858, 


Horace Gaylord, 


Ashford, 


1862. 


1858, 


David P. Nichols, 


Danbury, 


i875. 


1858, 


Thos. A. Miller, 


Torrington, 


1859. 


1858, 


Benjamin Douglass, 


Middletown, 


1876. 


1859, 


Hiram Foster, 


Meriden, 


1873. 






I >l IIIH S I A If !< I MHIM MIIOOI . 



35 



ini->io 

862, 

871, 

8731 

•VI- 
874, 

'75- 

> s 75- 
875. 

876. 

877- 

s 77- 

»79i 
879, 

S79, 



Date of 
Retirement. 



Dan 1 1 lG. I'i \ it. 
1 1 1 :Nm Mi Cray, 
Roswki 1 l>u<»\\ \. 
W'll 1.1 wi Swif ! . 
1 I ! NRY 1>. I [UBBARD, 
|.WI1> I). Whitcomb, 

>RGE LaNGDON, 

I IlK.WI A. Y U.K. 

S. B. Co< ks, 

F () l>i:s NITT. 

Dblos 1 1. Stevens, 
( has. Fitzgerald, 
Edward W. Seymour. 
Goodwi n Collier, 
C HABLE8 L. English, 
John M Brewer, 
G. II. Preston, M. D. 
Vinci yi r, 

John L. Hous i >n, 

A. P. WlLLOUGHBY, 

Charles Pabrique, 
J. S. Lathrop, 
Theodore Bikd. 



Hied in office, 1S71 . 



Washington 

Ellington, [876. 

Hartford. died in office, 1877. 



R] SIDEN I 
^77. Isaac C. Ll WIS, 
877, Chas. L. LTpham, 

S77. Owen B. Arnold. 



Windham, 


1866. 


Middletown, 


declined. 


Brooklyn, 


1874. 


Plymouth, 


1875. 


Meriden, 


1877. 


I luntington, 


resigned, 1876. 


Willimantie. 


still in office. 


Barkhampstead 


retired. 1879. 


Middletown, 


still in office. 


Litchfield, 


1876. 


Hartford. 


1876. 


New Haven, 


resigned. 


Norwich, died 


in office, 1878. 


Tolland. 


still in office. 


Darien. 


.. 


Thompsonville. 


.. 


Norwich. 


retired. 1879. 


New Haven. 


still in office. 


Norwich. 


. * kt 


Bethlehem, 


1. 


TRUSTEES. 




Meriden, 


^till in office. 




it 11 



36 report of the trustees [January. 



FORM OF INDENTURE ADOPTED BY THE TRUSTEES. 



To the Trustees of the Connecticut State Reform School: 

I hereby request that the boy named 

received as indentured, according to law, to the STATE 
REFORM SCHOOL, at Meriden, and T hereby bind myself and 
agree to the following conditions, viz : 

The price of board, education, training, and clothing for said 
boy, shall be at the rate of Three Dollars per week, payable 
quarterly in advance, and the said 

is bound to remain in the Institution for the 
term of months, entitled to the same super- 

vision, medical treatment, support and education, and subject to the 
same regulations, employment, and restraint, as all other inmates 

of said school. 

[Signed.] 



(>[• mi si \ 1 B RBPORM SCHOOL .^7 



^.IVEEISriDlVLETsrXS TO LAW 

RELATING TO Till- REFORM SCHOOL MERIDEN 



Be it enacted by the Senate ana 1 House of Representatives in 

General Assembly con v e n ed: 

* 

Section i. Whenever any boy under the age of sixteen yean 

!>hall be convicted of any crime or misdemeanor, punishable by fine 

or imprisonment other than imprisonment for life, the court or jus- 
tice of the peace, a< the case may be, may commit him to the Re- 
form School, to remain until he shall arrive at the age of twent\ - 
one years, unless sooner discharged by the Board of Trustees. And 
the judges of the criminal and police courts of the State and justices 
of the peace shall have power to commit to the Reform School: 
first, any boy under sixteen years of age, who may he liable to pun- 
ishment by imprisonment under any existing law of the State, or any 
law that may he enacted and in force in the State: second, any boy 
under sixteen years of age, with the consent of his parent or guar- 
dian, against whom any charge of committing any crime or misde- 
meanor shall have been made, the punishment of which, on con- 
viction, would be confinement in jail or prison ; third, any boy 
under sixteen years of age, who is destitute of a suitable home and 
adequate means of obtaining an honest living, or who is in danger 
of being brought up. or is brought up, to lead an idle or vicious 
life : fourth, any boy under sixteen years of age, who is incorrigi- 
ble, or habitually disregards the commands of his father or mother 
or guardian, who leads a vagrant life, or resorts to immoral places 
or practices, or neglects or refuses to perform labor suitable to his 
and condition, or to attend school. 
SEC. 2. That every boy sent to the Reform School shall re- 
main until he is twenty-one years of age. unless sooner discharged 
or bound as an apprentice : but no boy shall be retained after the 
Superintendent shall have reported him fully reformed. 

;. That whenever there shall be as large a number of b 
in ti S >1 as can be- properl) accommodated, it shall be the 



i 



38 report of the Trustees [January, 

duty of the President of the Board of Trustees to give notice to the 
criminal and police courts of the fact; whereupon no boys shall be 
sent to the School by the said courts until notice shall be given them 
by the President of the Board that more can be received. 

Sec. 4. If any person shall entice or attempt to entice away 
from said School any boy legally committed to the same, or shall 
knowingly harbor, conceal, or aid in harboring or concealing any 
boy who shall have escaped from said School, such person shall, 
upon conviction thereof, be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and 
shall pay a fine of not less than ten nor more than one hundred dol- 
lars, which shall be paid to the Treasurer of the Board of Trustees ; 
and every sheriff, deputy sheriff, constable, or officer of local po- 
lice, and any officer or employee of said School shall have power, 
and it is hereby made his duty to arrest any boy, when in his pow- 
er so to do, who shall have escaped from said School, and return 
him thereto. 

Sec. 5. That the Trustees shall have full power to place any 
boy committed as herein described, during minority, at such em- 
ployment, and cause him to be instructed in such branches of useful 
knowledge as may be suitable to his years and capacity, as they 
may see fit ; and they may, with the consent of any such boy, or his 
parents, or guardians, bind him out as an apprentice during his 
minority, or for a shorter period, to learn a trade, or to other em- 
ployment, as in their judgment will tend to his future benefit; and 
the President of the Board shall, for such -a purpose, have power to 
execute and deliver, on behalf of the said board, indentures of ap- 
prenticeship for any such boy ; and such indentures shall have the 
same force and effect as indentures of apprenticeship executed by 
his legal guardian, and shall be filed with the records in the office 
// of the Reform School. 

Sec. 6. In case any boy so apprenticed shall prove untrust- 
worthy and unreformed, the Trustees may, at their discretion, re- 
ceive such boy into the Reform School, to be held in the same 
manner as before his said apprenticeship, and may thereupon can- 
cel the indentures of such boy. And if in the opinion ol" the Trus- 
tees any boy apprenticed out by them shall have an unsuitable 
home, or if the person to whom such boy is indentured shall be- 
come unfit or incapable to properly raise or take care of him, the 
Trustees may at their discretion return such boy to the School. 

Sec. 7. Whenever a boy is dismissed from the School to his 



hi i ii l STAT! REFORM SCHOOl • 39 

parents <>i to otherwise care for himself (except by indenture, a^ in 
the foregoing section), he shall be dismissed on probation merely, 
and the Board of Trustees shall have power to send tor. and return 
him to the School, when in the opinion of a majority of the mem- 
bers of Said board, the hest interests of the hoy will be promoted h\ 
such return. 

SBC. 8. All acts inconsistent with the foregoing are hereby re- 
pealed. 



An Act in Addition to an Act Entitled "An Act Concerning 

Education." 

Resolved by this Assembly: That in the several Reform Schools 
in this State equal privileges shall be granted to clergymen of all 
religious denominations to impart religious instruction to the in- 
mates thereof: and that every opportunity be allowed such clergy- 
men to give t«> the inmates belonging to their respective denomina- 
tions, such religious and moral instruction as said clergymen may 
desire, and the Trustees ot Baid institutions shall prescribe reason- 
able times ami places, not inconsistent with the proper management 
ot" said institutions, when and where such instruction may be given, 
and such instruction shall be open to all who may chose to attend. 
Approved July 25th. 1874. 



I 






- • ••" * « 



Twelfth Report 



OF I ii I 



Board of I)iri«:ctors 



UV THE 



CONNECTICUT 



A® 



iclnbnsttjmji^tlpal fm| 4^ irk 




^Jrcscntcb to tf)t (Dtntr.U XlsscmMii at its Session in 3anuarp, ISS2. 



IODDLETOWN, CONN.: 
Pelton & King, Printers and BOOK-BlNDERS. 

1882. 



Board of Directors and Officers, 



FREDERIC GARDINER, President, 
THOMAS K. FESSENDEN, Secretary, 
CHARLES F. BROWNING, Treasurer, 



MlDDLETOWN. 

Farmington. 

MlDDLETOWN. 



DIRECTORS, (EX- OFFICIO.) 

HOBART B. BIGELOW, - New Haven. 

WILLIAM H. BULKELEY, - - - - - - Hartford. 

CHARLES E. SEARLES, .,.-.- Thompson. 



DIRECTORS ELECTED, 

WHOSE TERM OF OFFICE EXPIRES RESPECTIVELY IN 

1882. 

H. D. SMITH, - - Plantsville. 

W. W. WILCOX, - - MlDDLETOWN. 

CHARLES FABRIQUE, - - - - - -' New Haven. 

C. F. BROWNING, MlDDLETOWN. 

1883. 

Dr. E. K. HUNT, ------- Hartford. 

THOMAS K. FESSENDEN, ----- Farmington. 

JOHN M. VAN VLECK, . - - - - Middletown. 

FREDERIC GARDINER, Middletown. 

1884. 

JAMES E. ENGLISH, ------ New Haven. 

T. M. ALLYN, - - - Hartford. 

Dr. J. W. ALSOP, ------- Middletown. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

J. M. VAN VLECK, C. F. BROWNING, 

FREDERIC GARDINER, W. W. WILCOX, 

Dr. J. W. ALSOP. 

VISITING COMMITTEE OF LADIES FOR YEAR tl 

January and July. 

Miss CLARA ALSOP, ------ Middletown. 

MISS EMILY TRACY, MroDLETOWN. 

February and August. 

Mrs. L. F. S. FOSTER, Norwich. 

Mrs. 1. X. HARRIS, New London. 

March and September. 

Mrs. L. L. CAMP, - New Haven. 

Mrs. W. I). WHITNEY, - - NEW HAVEN. 

April and October. 

Miss margaret s. hubbard, - middletown. 

Mrs. C. J. HILL, Middletown. 

May and November. 

Mrs. bexjamix douglas, ----- middletown. 

ESTHER PRATT, Hartford. 

June and December. 

Miss ELLEN HOOKER, II.u; 

Miss M. C. HUNTINGTON, Hak: 



i 



Resident Officers. 

4 

CHARLES H. BOND, - , - - -• - - - Superintendent. 
Mrs. LYDIA M. BOND, - - - Assistant Superintendent. 

PRATT HOME. 
MISS KATE M. AYRES, - Matron. 

Mrs. PAULINE V. KING, - Assistant Matron. 

STREET HOME. 
Mrs. S. S. JOHNSON, ------- Matron. 

Mrs. J. T. NEWELL, - - - - . - Assistant Matron. 

ALLYK HOME. 
Mrs. R. L. BUTTERWORTH, - - - - - Matron. 
Mrs. CARRIE M. WILBUR, - - - - Assistant Matron. 

ROGERS HOME. 

Miss L. E. SCUDDER, Matron. 

Miss HATTIE HALL, ----- Assistant Matron. 

TEACHERS. 
Miss ESTHER H. THOMPSON, - - Principal. 

Miss MAY MERRY, - Intermediate and Music. 

Miss J. M. BEACH, -------- Primary. 

LAUNDRY DEPARTMENT. 
Miss ADA H. WHITTAKER. 

DRESS MAKING AND CUSTOM DEPARTMENT. 
Mrs. L. P. FAIRBANK. 

Mrs. JULIA F. GRAY, Housekeeper. 

PAPER BOX DEPARTMENT. 
WATSON A. BUSHNELL, Mrs. R. A. PARDEE. 

FARM AND GARDEN. 
BRADLEY J. RUNDELL, FRANK G. ELLIOTT. 

EDWARD DUNNE, ------- Watchman. 

PUPIL ASSISTANTS. 

LUCY M. EDWARDS, MAGGIE WILSON, ADELAIDE BURNS, 

ERMINA EILER, ANGELINE WADSWORTH. 



Report of the Directors. 



To the I[<>norabL\ the Legislature of the State of Conned it ut, and to the 
factor* and Friends of the Industrial School for Girls, the 
Directors respectfully present their 

TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT. 

The number of girls in the School December ist, 1880, was, 160 

The number received during the year has been, - 61 

The number " placed out" and discharged, - 47 

The number remaining in the School Dec. ist, 1881, is, - 174 

Whole number received since Jan. ist, 1870, - - - 480 

During the year the number of girls rose to 176, but their great 
improvement has made it safe to place them in families rapidly. The 
number was thus subsequently reduced to 169. Fresh commitments 
and some returns have again swelled the total.* It will be seen by 
the accompanying report of the Superintendent that the average num- 
ber has been considerably larger than ever before. It is our purpose 
to place the girls in families as rapidly as is consistent with our dun- 
to them, and should the efforts of the officers be rewarded with as 
rapid an improvement in the girls, it will be possible to continue the 
11 placing out" at the same rate as during the past year; but still expe- 
rience shows that we must look for a steady increase in the number 
of our wards. 

fifth Home was already covered in al the date of the last report. 
By means of the appropriation from the Legislature it has since been 
completed, but has not yet been occupied. When the bills are all 

the cost will exceed the estimate submitted by about $400, and 

*It now stands December 2 ist, at 180. 



6 

other expenses and much needed improvements have left us with 
insufficient means to complete the furnishing, although something 
has already been done towards this. The economy of the improve- 
ments in drainage and in some of the farm arrangements is expected 
to be considerable and will be largely increased when we have our own 
water supply. The gifts of the benevolent will nevertheless be still 
much needed and are very earnestly solicited. , Meantime the strain 
upon our whole arrangements is great, 174 to 176* being crowded 
into Homes designed for 140. 

The last Legislature also made an appropriation towards an inde- 
pendent water supply. In this matter we are especially happy to be 
able to report good progress. The necessary land has been purchased 
and the reservoir and dam constructed in a very .thorough manner; 
all conflicting rights have been adjusted and the right of way for the 
pipe secured. Notwithstanding the delays occasioned by these nego- 
tiations, the whole pipe would have been laid had the contractor been 
able to secure the necessary materials in time. As it is, 2,500 feet 
of pipe are in place and covered, and the remainder will be completed 
as early in the spring as the weather may allow. There will be very 
little real delay in the use of the water, as the reservoir must first be 
filled by winter snows and rains and meantime the dam will be thor- 
oughly tested. The whole expense of the water supply, in conse- 
quence of unexpected damages claimed, will somewhat exceed the 
estimate; exactly stated, the estimate was $10,000, the cost will be 
about 110,419. A greater security from fire, better provisions for 
health and a decided economy both in the saving of water rent and 
much more in the saving of labor, must follow this introduction of 
water. 

In regard to both this and the new Home we more and more 
realize that the action of the Legislature was a wise provision for the 
wards whom it has committed to our care, and was taken not at all 
too soon to relieve most pressing wants of the Institution. 

The accompanying report of the attending physician shows that 
the health of the School has been remarkably good. We have to 
record one death which, however, must have occurred in any situa- 
tion. The girls have all been vaccinated and the unsuccessful cases 
re-vaccinated. The very small number of cases in which the opera- 
tion was finally unsuccessful* shows how generally it was needed. 

The industries of the School have been successfully prosecuted with 



-And now 180. 



a fair profit which has materially helped in the support of the School. 
We look upon these industries as incomparably more important in 
educating the girls to become industrious, self-supporting and 

respectable women than as a means of immediate pecuniary benefit. 
Hence, as soon as the girls become in any considerable degree pro- 
ficient in one department they are transferred to another, and as soon 
as they are fitted to earn their own living they are "placed out." 
This reduces ns to what maybe called "apprentice labor" in every 
department, and makes our industries far less profitable than if con- 
ducted with a view solely to pecuniar}- advantage. It is believed, 
however, that the true interests of the State are identical with the 
greatest improvement of the girls, and hence that the policy described 
is the right one. The proposed new industry of a "custom laundry" 
must still wait for the occupation of the new Home and the comple- 
tion of the water supply. 

A new arrangement has been recently adopted in the School from 
which we expect great advantage. There are always a certain number 
of the larger girls whose education has been so utterly neglected 
before they come to us that they are necessarily classed with the very 
smallest. They thereby become discouraged, and it is practically 
impossible in our full school rooms to give them that large share of 
individual attention which they require. These have been formed 
into two evening classes under pupil teachers, to their own great delight 
and with every promise of their much more rapid advancement. 

The progress of the Institution in its chief end, the moral improve- 
ment of the girls, has been so great that we almost fear to rely upon 
the evidence constantly before our eyes. The work in this, as in 
other respects, must be carried on under the great disadvantage of 
constantly placing out in private families those girls whose good con- 
duct would form the best example and exercise the happiest influence 
over those who remain. But this is the necessary result of the good 
work done upon them. We are able to retain a few in the service of 
the School, and six of them have become fitted to fill the post of pupil 
assistants which they are now discharging most satisfactorily. I'-' 
the great gain of this arrangement to the girls themselves and to the 
>1, the State is thereby relieved of their support in some instances 
before they have been sufficiently confirmed by lapse of time in their 
jed life to go out safely from the shelter of the School and from 
the influence of its officers into the temptations of the world. We 
1 this utilizing of some of the most trustworthy and efficient girls 
to the good of the others as one of the happiest results of our work, 






8 

and it is done now to a larger extent than has ever been possible 
before. It gives them a most excellent start in life. 

There have also been some cases during the year of an extreme 
character, which have yielded and are now yielding to the influences 
brought to bear upon them. Above all, there is striking and reliable 
evidence that many of the girls are setting about their own improve- 
ment on the solid basis of quiet, steady, religious principle. We wish 
to emphasize the statement that there has never been a time in the 
history of the School when it was so evident that the efforts of the 
Superintendent and his assistant and the officers under them were 
being so richly rewarded in the permanent good effected. This con- 
dition of things will explain how it has been possible to "place out" 
the girls so rapidly with so few returns occasioned by their fault. 

The report of the visiting agent will show the general condition of 
those who have been " placed out." The number of these who still 
remain under our guardianship until they are of age is constantly in- 
creasing. Much valuable work among them may be done by the 
voluntary labor of benevolent ladies kindly given; but every year's 
experience impresses us more fully with the importance, in addition 
to all that may be done in this way, of a systematic visitation by an 
experienced person thoroughly familiar with the training given in the 
School. The judgment of such a person in regard to the fitness of 
the families in which the girls may be placed and the influence of the 
localities upon them is very essential. Accordingly one of our own 
number, a gentleman thoroughly familiar with the whole subject, 
has been appointed to this office, and his report for the past year is 
appended. 

The correspondence appended to the report of the Superintendent, 
though necessarily limited for want of space, will show something of 
the way in which the work of the School is regarded by those who 
have been under its influence. Many most interesting and encour- 
aging results are constantly being brought to our knowledge which 
can hardly be put in print. It will readily be understood that there 
is a reverse side to this picture and that there are cases in which every 
effort has proved unavailing. These must be expected while human 
nature remains as it is; but it is a great satisfaction to find that such 
instances are steadily diminishing in number, and that year by year 
the School is more and more fully accomplishing the work for which 
it was established. 

The interest taken by our Board of "Lady Visitors" is highly ap- 
preciated, and we hope that with the generally increasing efficiency 



9 

of the School, this feature of our organization may also be I 
into more prominence and greater helpfulness in every way. < »ur 
warmest thanks are also due to those whose interest, independently 
of any official duty, brings them to visit the institution. To the 
members of the Legislature and to the many other friends who have 
come to see us, we give our hearty thanks, and trust that hereafter 
also their interest will not flag. 

ThTs report cannot be closed without mention of the State Board of 
Charities and Correction, whose visits have been highly valued and 
whose activity promises to aid materially the wise and benevolent pur- 
poses of the State. 

In conclusion, we again appeal to our tried friends and especially 
to the Christian women of our State, to aid us with gifts and bequests, 
small or large, for our library, for furnishing our new Home, and for 
the many other needs that are continually arising in our work. We 
do not know that anyone of the many who have given so largely to 
the Institution have ever regretted what they have done; and it would 
be difficult to find any other means by which a holier or happier 
reward could be reaped in benefit to a neglected and otherwise most 
dangerous class of society, but here trained to become respectable 
women and in many cases earnest and true Christian wives and 
mothers. 

Adopted by the Board, December 21st, 1881. 

Frederic Gardiner, President. 
Thomas K. Fessexdex, Secretary. 



1 



Superintendent's Report. 



To the Directors of the Connecticut 

Industrial School for Girls : 

Gentlemen : In accordance with your requirement, I submit to 
you my Annual Report of the condition of the School. From pre- 
vious records and the statistics for the year ending November 30th, 
the following tables are prepared : 

TABLE I. 

NUMBERS FROM THE BEGINNING. 

Girls received into the School since January 1st, 1870, - 480 

^Dismissed since January 1st, 1870, ----- 455 
*Of these were returned, ------- 149 

Remaining out, --------- 306 

Number in School, December 1st, 1881, - 174 

TABLE II. 

NUMBER DURING PAST YEAR. 

In School December 1st, 1880, 160 

Received during the year, 61 

Whole number under care during the year, - 221 

Placed out during the year, ------- 47 

Remaining, December 1st, 1881, 174 



* These figures include a number of girls who have been placed out and returned repeatedly. 













// 














TABLE III. 






Received 


Each 


Month, 


[NCLl DING 


'.Ml!| COMMII Ml N 1 










Returns. 






MONTHS. 






year. 

1 


Previously. 


Total. 


December, 


1880, 






. 


34 


35 


January, 


1 881, 


• 


- 


- 


7 


35 


42 


February, 


" 


- 


- 


- 


7 


48 


55 


March, 


" 


- 


- 


- 


3 


5' 


54 


April, 


" 


- 


- 


_ 


4 


47 


5' 


May, 


" 


- 


- 


- 


4 


5^ 




June, 


•« 


- 


- 


- 


6 


58 


64 


lulv, 


" 


- 


- 


- 


4 


56 


60 


August, 


" 


- 


- 


- 


10 


40 


50 


September, 


" 


- 


- 


- 


5 


50 


55 


October, 


" 


- 


- 


- 


3 


60 


63 


November, 




- 


- 


- 


7 


43 


5o 


Total, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


«. 


574 


635 



TABLE I J'. 
Towns from which Girls were Committed. 



TOWNS. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Total. 


Andover, .... 

Branford, .... 

Berlin, - 

Bozrah, - 

Bridgeport, - 

Bridgewater, ... 

Burlington, - 

Bristol, ... . 

Bethel, - 

Brookfield, - 

Brooklyn, - 

liarkhamstead, 

Chatham, - 

Colchester, - 

Chester, - 

Cromwell, - 

Clinton, - 

Cheshire, .... 

Danbury, - 

Darien, - 


r i 1 m - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 


1 
2 

3 

1 

17 

2 

4 
2 

1 

2 

4 

3 
-i 

1 

1 

1 

3 

9 


1 
4 
3 

1 

1 1 

1 

4 

2 

1 
4 

I 

1 
1 
3 

( ; 

1 


Carried forward, 




59 


65 



12 



TABLE IV.— Continued. 



TOWNS. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Total. 


Brought forward, - 


6 


59 


65 


Derby, - 


— 


3 


3 


Durham, - 


2 




2 


Eastford, - 


— 


2 


2 


Essex, - 


I 


4' 


5 


Enfield, - ' - 





i 


1 


East Haven, 


— 


7 


7 


Fairfield, - 





i 


1 


Farmington, 


I 


3 


4 


Groton, - 





2 


2 


Glastonbury, - 





2 


2 


Granby, ... - 


I 


2 


3 


Greenwich, 


— 


I 


1 


Guilford, - 


— 


I 


1 


Haddam, - 


— 


4 


4 


Hadlyme, ... - 


I 




1 


Hartford, - 


9 


88 


97 


Kent, - 




i 


1 


Killingley, - - 


i 


i 


2 


Killingworth, 


i 


i 


2 


Litchfield, - 


— 


i 


1 


Lyme, - 


— 


2 


2 


Meriden, 


— 


9 


9 


Milford, - 


— 


2 


2 


Middletown, 


i 


13 


14 


Manchester, 







1 


Montville, - 


i 


i 


2. 


Naugatuck, 


i 


— 


1 


Newtown, - 


— 


4 


4 


New Milford, - 





i 


1 


North Manchester, 





2 


2 


Norwich, - 


— 


19 


l 9 


New Haven, - 


IO 


9° 


100 


North Haven, 





2 


2 


New Britain, 


i 


7 


8 


New London, 


— 


3 


3 


Norwalk, - 


3 


3 


6 


Oxford, - 


i 


2 


3 


Orange, - 


i 


I 


2 


Old Lyme, - 


. 


I 


1 


Plainfield, - - - . - 


i 


I 


2 


Plantsville, - 





2 


2 


'Preston, - 


— 


I 


1 


Plainville, - 





2 


2 


Portland, - 


— 


I 


1 


Plymouth, - 


i 


3 


4 


Putnam, - 


— 


3 


3 


Ridgefield, - 


— 


2 


2 


Salisbury, - 


— 


3 


3 


Carried forward, - 


44 


365 


409 



13 



TABLE fV.— Continued. 



TOWNS. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 
36S 


Total. 


Brought forward 


. 


44 




Sharon, 


- 




6 




Sherman, 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Stafford, 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Southington, 


- 


— 


7 


7 


SaybrooK, - 


- 


— 


5 


5 


Stamford, - 


- 


— 


7 


7 


Stratford, - 


- 


— 


2 


-> 


Stonington, 


- 


i 


1 


1 


North Stonington, 


- 


— 


t 


-> 


Thomaston, 


- 


i 


— 


1 


Torrington, 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Trumbull, - 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Thompsonville, - 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Vernon, 


- 


i 


4 


5 


Wallingford, 


- 


i 


2 


3 


Washington, 


- 


— 


1 


1 


West Hartford, - 


. 


— 


1 


1 


Winchester, 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Windham, 


. 


— 


7 


7 


Windsor Locks, - 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Waterbury, 


- 


2 


6 


8 


Willimantic, 


. 





2 


2 


Wethersfield, 


- 





2 


. 


Westport, 


- 





1 


1 


W T oodbury, 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Claremont, N. H., p 


boarder) 





1 
430 


1 


Totals, 


- 


SO 


480 




7 


\ABLE V. 








Ages of 


Girls Co.mm 


[TTED. 




AGES. 




Past Year. 


Previously. 


Total. 


Seven years, 'private boarder) 





1 


, 


Eight 


- 


5 


23 


28 


Nine " - 


- 


5 


"i -> 


27 


Ten " - 


. 


3 


23 


26 


Eleven " - 


- 


4 


43 


47 


Twelve " - 


- 


6 


52 


58 


Thirteen " - 


. 


6 


56 


62 


Fourteen " - 


. 


9 


119 


128 


Fifteen " - 


- 


12 


83 


95 


Sixteen " - 


. 





3 


3 


iteen - 


- 





_> 


-> 


Eighteen " - 


- 





1 


1 


I'nknown, - 


- 





2 


2 


Totals, - 


- 


SO 


430 





H 



TABLE VI. 
Nativity of Girls Committed. 



\\ 





Past Year. 


Previously. 


Total. 


Connecticut, 


_ 


44 


308 


352 


Massachusetts, 


- 




15 


15 


Maine, 


- 




2 


2 


Rhode Island, 


- 


— 


4 


4 


Vermont, 


- 


— 


3 


3 


New Hampshire, 


— 


2 


2 


New York, - 


- 


2 


35 


37 


New Jersey, 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Pennsylvania, 


- 


- 


— 


10 


10 


Maryland, - 


- 


- 


— 


2 


2 


Virginia, 


- 


- 


2 


1 


3 


Tennessee, - 


- 


- 





2 


2 


Georgia, 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Louisiana, - 


- 


- 


I 


1 


2 


Ohio, - 


- 


- 





3 


3 


North Carolina, 


- 


- 


3 


3 


South Carolina, 


- 


— 


1 




Illinois, 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Missouri, 


- 





1 


1 


Wisconsin, - 


- 





1 


1 


Canada, 


- 





3 


3 


District of Colu 


mbia, - 





2 


2 


England, 


- 


I 


6 


7 


Ireland, 


- 


— 


11 


11 


Germany, 


- 





2 


2 


Labrador, - 


- 




1 


1 


Unknown, - 


- 


— 


6 


6 


Totals, - 


- 


- 


50 


43o 


480 



TABLE VII. 
Parentage of Girls Committed. 



PARENTS. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Total. 


American, white, 


24 


191 


215 


American, colored, 


9 


53 


62 


English, ... - 


1 


10 


11 


French, - 


— 


4 


4 


German, - 


2 


15 


17 


Irish, ----- 


10 


114 


124 


Irish and English, 


— 


7 


7 


Irish and American, - 


4 


20 


24 


Scotch, - - 




4 


4 


Scotch-Canadian, 


— 


1 


1 


French-Canadian, 


— 


3 


3 


German and American, 


— 


3 


3 


English and American, 


— 


1 


1 


Unknown, - 


— 


4 


4 


Totals, - - - - 


5o 


430 


480 



Id 

TABLE VIII. 
Number Dismissed Each Month. 



MONTH. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Total. 


December, 1880, 


_ 


_ 


3 


30 


33 


January, 1881, 


- 


2 


17 


19 


February, " 


- 


2 


»7 


*9 


March, M 


- 


4 


54 


58 


April, 


- 


4 


44 


48 


May, 


- 


5 


38 


43 


June, 


- 


2 


30 


32 


July, 


- 


2 


36 


38 


August, 


- 


7 


40 


47 


September, " 


- 


7 


35 


42 


October, 


- 


5 


35 


40 


November, " 


- 


4 


32 


36 


Totals, - 


- 


47 


408 


455 



TABLE IX. 
Causes of Dismissal. 



CAUSE. 



Previously. Total. 









Expiration of minoritv, -» 


3 


3i 


Placed out in families, - 


34 


258 


Placed out with relatives, - 


6 


96 


Found unfit subjects, - 


» 


9 


Ordered to new trial, - 


— 


2 


Escaped, - 


— 


3 


Death, .... 


1 


6 


Placed in Hospital, 


— 


-1 


Remain as Assistants, - 


1 


1 



1 1 



Totals, - 



47 



455 



10 

TABLE X. 
Work Done by the Girls During Past Year. 



Aprons made, 

Bed Quilts Pieced, - 

Bed Quilts Quilted, - 

Button Holes worked 

Beds made, - 

Bags for Soiled Clothing^made, 

Bandages, 

Carpet Rags, 

Carpets, 

Chemises, 

Collars, 

Costumes for Tableaux, 

Comforters, 

Counterpanes, 

Combination Suits, 

Curtains, 

Dresses, 

Dust Caps, 

Drawers, pairs, 

Dish Cloths, 

Elastics. 

Floor Mats, 

Handkerchiefs, 

Holders, 

Hoods, 

Lambrequins, 

Napkins, 

Night Dresses, 

Pillow-cases, 

Pillow-tidies, 

Pillow-ticks, 

Sheets, 

Skirts, 

Stockings, (heels and toes run and marks sewed on), 

Sun-bonnets made, -------- 

Table-cloths, " - - - . - 

Table-covers, " - 

Towels, " -------- 

Waists, " - 

Articles repaired, -------- 

Articles washed, -------- 

Articles ironed, - - - - - - - - 

Articles made in Custom Sewing Department, in addition to 
Dressmaking, ------- 

Paper Boxes, 



644 

27 

23 
215 

78 
109 

52 

80 lbs. 

10 

300 

72 

8 

4 

SO 
10 

25 

502 

20 

275 

60 

150 

22 
226 

SO 
6l 

14 
60O 

201 
168 
40 
80 
2l6 
225 
695 

175 
16 

9 
34i 

286 

34, 73 2 
117,850 
117,815 

752 
170,000 



17 

At 2 P. M. work ceases in all departments, and the girls get ready 

for school. In each Home the house-work and Bewing are done by 
the Lrirls, under the direction ami instruction of the matrons. The 
Pratt Home furnishes ten girls for the paper-box simp and six for 
custom sewing department. The Street Home furnishes fifteen girls 
for the box shop, six for the dressmaking and custom department in 
Rogers Home, ami six for house-work in various places. 

In the Allyn Home the laundry work is done for the entire school 
It furnishes three girls for assistance in other Homes and school- 
room. 

The Rogers Home contains the smallest girls, but they are very 
active and useful in house-work and sewing. Eight girls are sent to 
the box shop from this Home, and four into the dressmaking and 
custom department. 

Time Table. 

From April 15th to Oct. 15th, Kitchen Girls rise at 5 o'clock A. M. 
Rising Bell, --...._ ^30 " 

Girls Breakfast, ------- 6 " " 

Officers Breakfast, 6:30 

Prayers, 7 

Work, 'all departments), ----- 7:30 

Recess, 9:50 

Work, -------- 10 '* " 

Recess, - - 12 " M. 

Dinner, I2 :io " P. M. 

Recess, - - 12:40 

Work, I2 : 5 5 

Dressing Bell, 2 «... 

Line for School, ------- 2:20 " " 

Recess, -------- 3:50 

School Closes, ------- 5:30 " " 

Supper, ----.___ 6 

Recreation, 6:30 

Prayers, 7:45 

From October 15th to April 15th, the Bell for Rising, breakfast and 
Morning Prayers will ring a half hour later than the above, and the Bell 
for Evening Prayers will ring at 7:30 P. M. 



18 



Box Factory, 

In Account with Connecticut Industrial School for Girls. 



Debtor. 



To Stock and tools on hand 1 December ist, 

1880, $3,954 99 

To bills and salaries paid from December ist, 

1880, to December ist, 1881, - - 4,574 54 

Net earnings for the year, - ^, 2 2>7 48 



$9>7 6 7 01 



Credit. 



By receipts from sale of boxes, from Decem- 
ber ist, 1880, to December ist, 1881, - 5,044 06 

By outstanding accounts December ist, 1 88 1, 549 29 

By stock and tools on hand December ist, 

1881, ------- 4,173 66 

$9,767 01 



19 



Custom Sewing Department. 

In A : 



Dettor. 



To stock on hand December ist, 1880, - - $105 36 
To expenditures from December ist, 1880, to 

December ist, 1SS1, - 460 55 

Net earnings for the year, - - - - 154 29 

$720 20 

Credit. 

By receipts from sale of articles from December 

ist, 1880, to December ist, 1881, - - $302 47 

By outstanding accounts, December ist, 1881, - 75 98 

imples out, unsold, December ist, 1881, - 6j 75 

By articles furnished to the School during the 

year, - - 31 00 

By stock on hand December ist, 18S1, - - 243 00 

$7* : 



>antt&[%{ f ttbttshpal $t\t&} h\\ itijk 



Account of Receipts and Expenditures. 

RECEIPTS. 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, Dec. ist, 1880, .... $8,485 33 

Cash in Superintendent's hands, Dec. ist, 1880, - - - 295 77 

From State, for board, clothing, education, etc., - 27,520 13 

From State, for fifth Home and Reservoir, (appropriation), - 18,500 00 

From interest on deposits, (less U. S. tax), - 274 08 

From donations, etc., - - - - - - - - 65 90 

From sale of dry goods, etc., - - - - - - 150 07 

From sale of books, _._ 2 00 

From sale of farm products, 169 08 

From. Construction account, 30 88 

From State Library appropriation, - - - - ' - 10 00 

From sale of paper boxes, ------- 5,044 06 

From Custom Sewing Department, ----- 302 47 

$60,849 77 

EXPENDITURES. 

Salaries and wages, $7, 106 44 

Furniture and fixtures, ------- 2,293 88 

Fuel and lights, --------- 2,765* 28 

Dry goods and clothing, ------- 2,978 58 

Books, stationery and postage, ------ 781 08 

Provisions and groceries, - . - - 3.499 I][ 

Fish and meat, - - - - - - - - - 2,535 70 

Flour and meal, --------- 1,919 90 

Farm and garden, -------- 3,669 48 

Construction and repairs, ------- 18,083 93 

Drugs and medical aid, ------- 565 83 

Miscellaneous, — travel, insurance, rent, etc., - - - 813 64 

Box Factory, - - a - - - - - - - 4,574 54 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, Dec. ist, 1881, - 9>°45 J 6 

Cash in Superintendent's hands, Dec. ist, 1881, - - - 217 22 

$60,849 77 



The above accounts have been examined monthly, and approved by 
the 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



u 

It is important that the statistics of the School Bhould be carefully 

prepared and examined. There are many items of interest to be 
gathered from these figures, but it is impossible to convey in a formal 
report a full idea of the moral development of the scholars and the 

improved moral tone of the School. The past year has been a re- 
markable one in this respect and we have reason to feel that our labor 
is not in vain. A number of hitherto unmanageable cases have 
learned to yield prompt and cheerful obedience, and several who were 
unworthy of our confidence one or two years ago may now be trusted 
to the fullest extent with privileges and responsibilities. Underlying 
this improvement in conduct, there seems to be a foundation of cor- 
rect principles and, in some cases, an earnest desire to look unto 
Him who "helpeth our infirmities." There can certainly be no true 
reformation without a religious sentiment, which should develop nat- 
urally and without constraint. In a school of this kind we are very 
careful to avoid any allusion to denominational peculiarities, but 
rather to teach the duties we owe to God and to one another. The 
real success of an institution or of a nation depends upon the recog- 
nition and observance of the Divine law in our daily walk and con- 
versation. A sincere desire to have our thoughts, words and actions 
acceptable in the sight of God is the strongest incentive to a better 
life. 

Referring to the table you will observe that the commitments have 
averaged 4 1-6 per month, which is an increase of one-twelfth over the 
monthly average of the previous year. The average age of those com- 
mitted since December 1st, 1880, was 12 3-10 years, and from the 
beginning, 12 2-3 years. Of 50 new commitments, 24 are the 
children of American-born, white parents, and 9 of colored. 

We have placed out forty-seven girls during the year and there have 
been only eleven returned — just one-half the number returned the 
year previous. We have carefully considered the causes of these 
returns, and we find that five were in unsuitable places, or were in the 
midst of objectionable surroundings; two were brought back because 
the parties did not need help and wished to save expense, while only 
four were returned on account of actual faults. In the latter ( 
more careful management and a firmer control would doubtless have 
prevented the necessity of returning the girls. 

The report of the Visiting Agent will inform you as to the welfare 
of those living out in families, employed at housework and self-sup- 
porting. The importance of these visits cannot be over-estimated: 
our experience during the year has convinced us of the wisdom of 



22 

this arrangement. It is not enough that we should write letters and 
receive replies; neither can we depend upon occasional reports from 
disinterested parties. It is far better to commit this work to one per- 
son, deeply interested in the subject, clothed with authority and pre- 
pared to make any change that may be necessary. It is expedient at 
times, to transfer a girl from one family to another, rather than to 
return her to the School. Difficulties may be overcome, differences 
adjusted and misunderstandings corrected by the timely visits of this 
officer. In addition to all this, and equally important, is the effect 
upon the families employing the girls and upon the girls them- 
selves. The unexpected appearance of a representative of the School 
and the constant expectation of another visit will lead to a more care- 
ful observance of our requirements in the treatment of our wards, and 
this practical continuance of our guardianship will be a wholesome 
restraint to wayward girls and a pleasant surprise to those who are 
doing well. 

In one or more of the States the children are placed in families 
more rapidly, with less preparatory training; but we feel that our 
work in this respect is more satisfactory because more successful. We 
know that permanent habits of obedience, neatness and industry 
cannot be thoroughly acquired in a few months. We are anxious to 
send girls to good homes so soon as they are ready to leave the 
School. We are compelled to make room for new-comers; but we 
are not willing to depart from our established plan which has been in 
successful operation for years. 

We make no boast of the increase of our number except that it indi- 
cates confidence in the management. We are endeavoring to reduce 
the number by distributing our scholars among the best families in 
the State, always preferring good homes in the country. In this con- 
nection, permit me to suggest that no girls should be committed to 
this School merely because they are homeless — because they are 
mentally deficient or physically diseased, or because parents are shirk- 
ing their responsibilities by getting rid of their children. We would 
be fairly understood in this matter. We desire to protect our good 
State from needless expense and therefore urge upon parents the duty 
of carefully training and properly providing for their own. When we 
look for the cause of this lamentable neglect, examining the histories 
of those committed to our care, we do not hesitate to assert that in- 
temperance is the demon which does much of the deadly work, break- 
ing family ties and cursing parents and children. 

The increase of our number since Dec. ist, 1880, has been at the 



rate of 8 • • per cent, which shows B falling off Of nearly 4 per 1 
This is accounted for by the fact, already mentioned, that we have 
had a less number returned from homes in which we had placed 

them. This is acceptable as aiding in the answer to the important 
question, "How shall we limit our number of inmat* We UOM 

have 174 girls, arranged in the several Homes as follows : in the 
Pratt Home, 48; in the Street Home, 43: in -the Allyn Home, 34, 
and in Rogers Home, 49- These Homes are all filled, — two of 
them being crowded. When the fifth Home is opened, we will be 
able to relieve the pressure upon our present accommodations, but 
the necessity for " placing out " as rapidly as possible will still con- 
tinue. 

This new Home is an excellent building, — complete and conve- 
nient in all its appointments. It has been erected under the faithful 
supervision of Mr. Browning, whose careful attention has also been 
given to the reservoir, the dam, and the laving of water-pipe along a 
part o( our line. The future will show that all this work has been 
unusually well done. There have been several important improve- 
ments on the farm, which were greatly needed, especially the drainage 
of the meadow. Our dairy has been increased to meet the demand 
upon it; we have bought a pair of serviceable horses and built a silo. 
Mr. A. S. Bullock resigned April 1st, and Mr. B. J. Rundell was 
appointed head farmer. 

The educational department is in a fair condition, although the 
teachers are anxious to make further improvements. Mr. Fabrique 
has made frequent visits to the school-rooms during the year, taking 
a special interest in the backward scholars at an advanced age. 
Within a few weeks we have inaugurated the evening classes in the 
Homes, with girls as teachers. Miss Carleton having resigned her 
position, we appointed Miss E. H. Thompson, a graduate of Wil- 
braham, Principal of the schools, who is faithful and conscientious 
in the discharge of her important duties. 

The several Homes are well managed by efficient matrons, who 
certainly have the interest of their girls at heart. Those in charge of 
the various departments deserve our hearty commendation for earnest 
attention to their duties and devotion to their work. We have a 
most excellent corps of officers and teachers, who are always ready t<> 
coroperate with us in our efforts to save those who are in danger, and 
to maintain the reputation of the School as a true reformatory. 

The health of the girls has continued to be remarkably good, 
the 9th of August occurred the death of lata F. Dauchy, referred to 






in the Physician's report. This little girl was tenderly cared for dur- 
ing her illness, and everything was done for her comfort. She was 
buried here, the funeral services being conducted by Rev. T. K. 
Fessenden, Hon. H. D. Smith, and the Superintendent. Dr. 
Edgerton has been very attentive to his professional duties here, and 
his promptness in responding to our calls has prevented more serious 
illness in many cases. ■ The successful vaccination of the scholars has 
relieved our minds of much anxiety. 

In looking over my journal for the year, I find that we have been 
informed of the marriage of at least eleven of our girls who have gone out 
from the School. At least nine of these, so far as we may know, 
have married respectable and industrious men. 

In February, the Committee on Humane Institutions made us a 
visit, and during the same month over 200 members of the General 
Assembly inspected the School in all its departments. In March, 
our hearts were made glad by the appropriation of $18,500, to com- 
plete our fifth Home and to aid us in getting a water supply. The State 
Board of Charities have been here several times during the year, 
giving their attention to our condition and needs. Their visits have 
certainly been very gratifying and encouraging to us. The Lady 
Visitors have not called very frequently, owing in some cases to illness 
and absence from their homes. Several have been very faithful, and 
the ladies in Middletown have attended to these duties. 

In our box-making department our profits have fallen off some- 
what; but we are compelled to furnish these goods at low figures, in 
order to hold our customers and provide the girls with work. Our 
first object is to teach them the trade, and secondly to realize a profit 
on our labor, as far as possible. The net gain for the year in the 
custom-sewing department has been good considering the difficulties 
to be overcome in starting a new industry. The demand for these 
goods is increasing and the girls are learning to do beautiful work, 
which can be made at their homes, away from the questionable in- 
fluences of the shops. The best policy is to teach the girls to be self- 
supporting when they go out into the world, rather than to employ 
them at trades profitable to the institution but useless to the children. 

The girls have enjoyed the holidays and the ladies in charge have 
done everything to make them happy. The usual entertainments 
have been given as a reward for good deportment in the School. 
The special feature of Thanksgiving day was the presentation of the 
staff and flag by our friends in Middletown. We would here express 
our thanks to Messrs. A. G. McKee and A. Dessauer and to all the 



contributors to the fond which provided these handsome tokens of 
their friendship. 

The pastors of the churches in Middletown, several of the pi 
sors of the Wesleyan University and the Berkeley Divinity School, 
and other clergymen and friends have conducted our chapel services 
during the year cheerfully and without compensation. They shall 
not lose their reward. We thank them from our hearts for thus 
ing us in our work, and we can assure them that their words of 
instruction and exhortation are not forgotten. 

We thank the generous donors whose names are on the list, for 
their kind remembrance. We acknowledge our indebtedness to the 
Middletown correspondent of the Hartford Evening Post and to the 
editors and publishers of the Sentinel and Witness and the Constitution 
of this city, for their friendly interest and helpful words. 

The members of the Executive Committee have faithfully attended 
to their duties in the inspection of the departments and accounts. 
They have also taken a deep interest in the education and elevation 
of the scholars. They will please accept our thanks for their wel- 
come visits and advice. We are deeply grateful to the gentlemen of 
the Board of Directors for their confidence in us and for the encour- 
agement we have always received from them. 

Grateful to God for the blessings of the past and trusting Him for 
the future, we enter upon the labors of another year. 

Respectfully yours, 

CHARLES H. BOND, 

Superintendent. 

December ist. 1 88 1. 



i 
i 



26 



Donations. 



December 1st, 1880 to December 1st, 1881. 

CASH. 

State Library appropriation, $10 oo 

Congregational Sunday School, Colchester, - - - - 3 oo 

Mrs. E. K. Hunt, Hartford, 5 00 

G. F. Prior & Co., Middletown, - - - ' - - 1 50 

Edward Payne, Middletown, 5 00 

Coles & Weeks, Middletown, - - 5 00 

D. R. Brownlow, Middletown, ------- 5 00 

E. B. Smith, Middletown, ------- 5 00 

Income Donation Fund, (per Dr. Geo. W. Burke, Treas.,) - 8 40 

A. Dessauer, Middletown, 1 00 

A. G. McKee, Middletown, - - - 5 00 

Esther Pratt, Hartford, - -10 00 

G. F. Prior & Co., Middletown, - 2 00 

William Howard, Brooklyn, N. Y., 10 00 

A number of friends in Middletown, and elsewhere, have donated a 
sum of money for special educational purposes. The amount will 
appear in the next Report. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
I880. 

Dec. — Mrs. Monroe, Southport, package of papers. 

Mrs. A. R. Crittenden, Middletown, twenty-five pounds candy 

for Rogers Home girls. 
Mr. Thomas J. Atkins, Long Hill, Christmas tree and lot of 
evergreens. 
For Christmas, 1880 : — 

A. Dessauer, ruches and silk ties. 

W. I. Ayres, box raisins. 

S. C. Hastings, lot picture books. 

E. A. Gladwin, large lot toys. 

Southmayd & Gardiner, 200 fine oranges. 

Mrs. Benjamin Douglas, confectionery, mittens, hoods and 
fancy goods. 



For Christmas, 1SS0: — 

A. G. McKee, one and one-half do/, perfumery, Lot of cornu- 
copias. 

D. L. Weeks & Sons, a lot of to;. etc. 
Mclndue & Scovill, large lot of dates. 

Wilson & Burr, one-half do/, pair steel scissors. 
J. \Y. Stueck, lot of cakes and candies. 
L. R. Hazen, lot of fine paints. 

I. II . Bunce, thread, boxes, handkerchiefs, ten fancy boxes, etc. 
l88l. 
January.— Fifty copies New Testament and Psalms. A New Year's 

gift from the Middletown Bible Society, per Rev. C. J. Hill. 
From Morgan Street Mission School, Hartford, Scribner's, 

Harper's, St. Nicholas magazines, and Youth's Companion. 
Miss E. Tracy, Middletown, large package papers. 
Hon. Charles Fabrique, New Haven, a lot of school books, etc. 
March. A. O. Dickey, Worcester, Mass., two boxes of books. 

Mrs. A. Carleton, Windsor, Conn., a package of papers. 
Mr. D. R. Brownlow, six flower sprinklers. 
April. Hon. W. W. Wilcox, Middletown, a bound volume of Harper's 

Weekly and other reading matter. 
From a friend in Middletown, thirty Prayer Books and 

thirty Hymnals. 
Miss Esther Pratt, Hartford, large and valuable package of 

books and papers. 
Miss S. A. Morse, New Haven, large lot of magazines. 
Besek Lodge, No. 60, Middlefield, Mrs. Chas. E. Camp, Sec, 

large and valuable package of magazines, (entire volumes), 

Lippincott's, Atlantic, etc. 
Lot of choice pear trees from Rev. Dr. Gardiner, Middletown. 

E. M. Beardsley, Long Hill, Child's Paper for the last fifteen 
years. 

May. Ten bound volumes of Ladies Repository, from Mrs. Marshall 

D. Andrus, Middletown, Conn. 
Miss Gertrude E. Bradley, Meriden, Conn., valuable package 

of magazines, Godey's Peterson's, etc. 
Mrs. Esther Matthews, Middletown, box of slate pencils, best 

quality. 
Miss E. Tracy, Middletown, Conn., lot of bulbs. 
Hon. W. W. Wilcox, Harper's Weekly for a year. 
From Ladies of Meriden, two boxes of books, magazines, etc. 
June. Ernest King & Son, Publishers, one copy of Middletown 

Directory for 1881. 
Mr. John Bliss, Middletown, Conn., three books for library. 
Rev. C. W. Church, Middletown, Conn., large package of 

papers. 
A. G. McKee, a map of Connecticut. 



i 
i 



For July 4th, 188 1:— 

Southmayd & Gardiner, two and one-quarter bushels roasted 

peanuts. 
E. A. Gladwin, 200 small flags. 

J. W. Stueck, large quantity of confectionery and fancy cakes. 
Wilson & Burr, box fire crackers. 
July. J. Farnham, Middletown, one can maple syrup. 

Hon. W. W. Wilcox, Middletown, Conn., lot of papers and 

magazines. 
Miss Emily Tracy, Middletown, Conn., papers and magazines. 
Hon. W. W. Wilcox, Middletown, large fire-proof safe. 
Mrs. C. J. Hill, Middletown, lot of books for Rogers Home. 
August. George Mclndue, Middletown, basket of bananas. 
A. G. McKee, Middletown, 150 slate sponges. 
Marcus Marx, Esq., New York, one new Branson knitting 
machine, and one volume Homely and Religious Subjects. 
Miss Morse, New Haven, Harper's Young People. 
October. Mr. C. F. Browning, Middletown, large quantity of fruit. 
Nov. S. C. Hastings, Middletown, Conn., lot of pictures. 

A. G. McKee, Middletown, lot of rubber combs. 
Miss Margaret S. Hubbard, Middletown, lot of calico for the 

custom department. 
Wm. H. Edwards, Esq., Killingly, Conn., twenty-two maga- 
zines. 

Miss Esther Pratt, Hartford, Conn., large donation of calico, 

thread, needles, pins, thimbles, brushes, combs, etc. 
Staff and Flag from citizens of Middletown. 
Ex-Governor English, New Haven, one hanging clock and 
two mantel clocks. 
For Thanksgiving. 

George Mclndue, Middletown, lot of candy. 
J. W. Stueck, city, lot of candy and nuts. 
S. C. Hastings, city, one box layer figs. 
Newell & Fowler, city, six turkeys. 
Nov. S. C. Hastings, city, 21 mottoes. 

Hon. Augustus Putnam, book of common prayer for pulpit. 

New Haven Register every day. 

Pelton & King, city, binding Scribner's, Harper's, and St. 

Nicholas magazines for the School. 
Mrs. C. J. Hill, city, one girl's coat. 
The following papers have been regularly sent to the School, free of 
cost: — Hartford Daily Courant, Hartford Evening Post, Hartford 
Weekly Times, The Constitution, Middletown, five copies; Sentinel and 
Witness, Middletown; Call and Citizen and Meriden Recorder, Meriden 
Weekly Republican; New York Weekly Witness and Christian Secre- 
tary, of Hartford. 

Note. — Other donations have been' received which will be duly 
acknowledged in the next report. 






Farmers Report. 






i - 



2 3 



Apples, - 

Beans, (Lima), 

Beans, (String), - - 22% 

Beets, - 48 bunches and i6 T 4 ' 



bushels, 



Beet Greens, - 




59^ 


" 


Beef, (killed). 




- 769 


pounds, 


Butter, - 




- 1,542-' 


t i 


Cabbage, 




- 3 26 


heads, 


Carrots, - 112 buncl 


les 


and 50 


bushels, 


Celery, - 




700 


heads, 


Corn, (Green }, 




- 644/i 


dozen, 


Chickens, 




" 395 


pounds, 


Eggs, - 




- 457 


dozen, 


Knsilage, 29 tons 


; ai 


id i, 200 


pounds, 


Grapes, - 




30 


t < 


Hay, - -53 tons 


and 190 


< « 


Ice, 




80 




Lard, 




50 


pounds, 


Lettuce, 




- 1,648 


heads, 


Milk, - 






pound-. 


Oats, 




900 


bundles, 


Onions, - 339 buncl 


tea 


and 4 


bushels, 


Parsley, - 




14 


bunches, 



$15 °° 



-2 



, 5 



22 50 
l6 02 

29 75 

49 98 

462 82 
26 cS 

33 "5 

35 00 
64 45 
7 1 10 
91 40 

■-.- ■ 

2 40 
962 42 
320 00 

7 5 

47 44 

45 °° 

31 »2 

I 4- 



i 





SO 


Parsnips, 


40 bushels, 


Pears, 


*3H • " 


Peas, (Green), 


3^A " 


Pie Plant, 


25^ pounds, 


Pigs and Calves, 


(increase), - 


Pork, - 


- 4,104 pounds, 


Potatoes, 


212^ bushels, 


Quinces, 


i# " 


Radishes, 


71 bunches 


Squashes, 


523 pounds, 


Strawberries, - 


502 quarts, 


Spinach, 


6 bushels, 


Tomatoes, 


uX " 


Turnips, 


105 



Total, 



- $H 


00 


17 


16 


57 


75 


10 


16 


- 119 


00 


- 328 


32 


- 191 


02 


3 


75 


3 


55 


26 


15 


90 


36 


2 


00 


14 


25 


59 


00 


$5.°24 


33 



si 

Treasurers Report 

138 L 



RECEIPTS. 

l88o. 

1. Balance in Treasury, $8,485 33 

1881. 

Dec. r. From State for board of Girls, - 27,520 13 

From State appropriation, 18,500 00 

From Donations, ------- 57 50 

From State library fund, - 10 00 

From Donation fund, ------ 8 40 

From Sales, custom department, - 302 47 

From Sale of boxes, ------ 5,044 06 

From Sales from farm, - - - - - - 169 08 

From Stationery sold, ------ 2 00 

From Dry goods sold, - - - - - - 150 07 

From Old iron sold, - 1 26 

From Rebate, R. D. Wood, .... 8 62 

From Rebate, E. P. Augur, - 5 00 
From New Haven Patent Water Pipe Co., for 

freight we had paid, - 1600 

From Interest on deposits, ----- 288 18 

Total receipts, ----- $60,568 10 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid 374 orders, including construction, $51,508 84 
Paid U. S. tax on deposits, - 14 10 

51,522 94 

Balance in Treasury Dec. 1st, 1881 , - $9,045 16 

We, the undersigned, have examined the preceding account, and find 
it correct, 

H. D. SMITH, ) . , v 
E. H. HUNT, [ *«**T*- 

ESTIMATES. 

There will be required to finish the new Home and 
put in the heating apparatus, without the fur- 
niture or Laundry machinery, - $2,436 89 

To complete laying pipe from Reservoir to School 

grounds, and some few bills outstanding,.- - 4,940 15 

$7,377 04 

Available balance, $1,668 12 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. I". BROWNING, 

Treasurer* 



32 



Teacher's Report. 



The school is divided into three departments: — Primary, number- 
ing 53; Intermediate, numbering 53; and Principal, numbering 73. 
The daily session of three hours, including recess, is from half-past 
two till half-past five o'clock. 

Only the rudiments of a practical education can be attempted. 
The girls need to be taught reading, writing, spelling, and a sufficient 
amount of arithmetic to enable them to keep their own accounts; 
and before this is attained all accomplishments are unsuitable. 

When the many impediments to the success of this school are con- 
sidered, perhaps the advancement is encouraging. Many committed 
here at advanced ages are sadly deficient in the first principles of 
book lore; while others whose knowledge of reading and arithmetic 
entitles them to enter advanced classes, are lamentably ignorant of 
matters which others in early childhood are taught at home. One in 
the principal room did not know in what State she lived; another, in 
what town; others can't tell the time of day by the clock. With 
some this ignorance is the result of indifference. Unless compelled, 
they will not study, and they necessitate a teacher to repeat the same 
things day after day, not only until they can understand, but until 
they cannot fail to remember. The great diversity in mental caliber 
renders classification difficult. 

Instead of a few peculiar dispositions to control, as in an ordinary 
school, a large proportion of our pupils are marked characters. 
Only the brightest of children could have committed the acts which 
have brought some here; but until their superior intellect has been 
turned from the bad course, it renders them even more difficult to 
control and teach than those who are mentally deficient. The 
best girls are constantly being sent out and their places filled by new 
ones, upon whom the process of civilization must be begun anew, so 
that the advancement of the rooms must always be slow. All come 
to school with energy somewhat abated by the morning hours of 
manual labor, With desk accommodations for but 142, and a school 



of 173, all the rooms are far loo full for comfort or profit. The num- 
ber of books is also iqadequ 

The standing in reading and penmanship is high, and the monthly 
drill in letter-writing is attended with encouraging results in compo- 
sition. There is a deficiency in arithmetic, geography, spelling 
morals. Music is an important feature of the school. From quarter 
to half an hour each day is spent in singing, under the charge of 
Miss May Merry, of the Intermediate room. 

The Primary department, taught by Miss Cora Whitaker, still 
maintains the reputation it earned in years past, of being the " ban- 
ner room*' in discipline. 

An evening class has been formed in two Homes of the older l 
Allyn and Street, under the charge of the Pupil Assistants, Misses 
Kiler and Wadsworth, the object of which is to help those girls whose 
size and years far exceed their education. 

The difficulties of the teachers' work are only equaled by the inter- 
Here, as in no other position, can one study character, and 
watch the mind and heart as they change and crystallize from a crude, 
even repulsive, state, to that which is beautiful. Sometimes their 
. lation and ignorance, when committed to this School, in after 
months become a contrasting setting to reflect the brightness of their 
nobler lives. 

The Library of 1,500 volumes is extensively patronized. It is a 
matter of regret that so large a proportion of the books are unsuited 
to the needs of the girls, and of those readable so many are badly 
uorn. Interesting children's histories, as Abbott's and Dickens', 
and a few of a more solid class, are eagerly sought. Travels and 
pie scientific books are appreciated. 

School Kxlrcises. 

Monday — Writing, Arithmetic, Spelling, Reading and History. 
Tuesday — Singing, Arithmetic, Spelling, Geography and Grammar. 

lnesday — Arithmetic, Spelling and Reading. 
Thursday — Writing, Arithmetic, Spelling, Geography and History. 
Friday— Singing, Arithmetic, Spelling, Reading and Grammar. 

nging, Bible Lesson and distributing Library books. 

;>cctfully, 

MIF.R II. THOMPSON, 

Principal 

December 2cth, 1 



34- 



Physician's Report. 



To the Honorable Board of Directors of the 

Connecticut Industrial School for Girls; 

Gentlemen : The year closing December ist, 1881, has been one 
exceptionally favorable as regards the health of those confided to your 
care. There has been an extraordinarily small amount of severe 
sickness among the pupils. Though the number of girls has been 
larger, there have been fewer grave cases come under my care than 
during the years immediately preceding. During the spring months 
there was a marked diminution in the number of cases of sore 
throats and those inflammatory affections of the lungs dependent 
upon exposure to wet and cold. 

Unquestionably, much of this may be explained by the perfected 
heating apparatus which the experience of former years has suggested, 
and the laying of plank walks, thereby removing one important factor 
in their causation. The disadvantages of a location exposed to cold 
winds and a clay soil, with its attendant muddiness during the thaw- 
ing period, have thus been neutralized, while its salubrity in other 
respects has been further demonstrated. 

During the year the pupils of the School were vaccinated, on 
account of the prevalence of small-pox throughout the State. One 
hundred and eighty-five vaccinations were performed, of which fifty- 
eight were primary, — that is, on those who had no mark showing 
previous vaccination; one hundred and ten secondary, — that is where 
there was a scar showing former vaccination; seventeen were re-vaccina- 
tions upon those who failed to take the first time. 

Each girl was vaccinated in two places. Of the fifty-eight noted as 
primary, all took; of the one hundred and ten noted as secondary, 
seventy were considered as having taken. Out of the seventeen re- 
vaccinations a few were successful. A list of the successful and 
unsuccessful cases- has been retained for future reference. Th^ virus 
employed was that taken direct from the cow, and furnished by Dr. 



H. A. Martin A Son, of Roxbury Station, Boston, on iv< 

which is so well ami favorably known to the medical profession. 

Daring the year :\n epidemic of : isited the school and 

attacked 'forty-two of the pupils. It was introduced by a girl from 
.. where measles were prevailing at the time. 

German measles (rodhelm ) prevailed to a limited extent, perhaps 
six or eight cases, They were so mild that I did not see all the cases, 
therefore I can not state their exact number. In my list I have only 
three cases of intermittent fever. This does not represent the whole 
number i : - the disease is so readily recognized and the treat- 

ment so simple that several of the cases did not come under my 
observation, but were treated by the Matrons with the prescription 
given to others having the same disease. Having made careful inquiry, 
I think the number was less than a dozen. Few had more than two 
chills; therefore malaria has given comparatively little sickness. 
There have been seven cases of facial erysipelas, five each of dysentery 
and follicular tonsillitis, four cases of conjunctivitis, three ephemeral 
fever, two each of continued fever, vulvitis and scrofulous abscess, 
one each of chorea, epilepsy, phthisis, rheumatism, impeligo, alveolar 
abscess, boils, otitis, inflamed cystic tumor of face, acute bronchitis, 
pleurodynia and diarrheca. There has been one death, the case of 
epilepsy. This girl was admitted while suffering from the disease, it 
having been developed several years in quite a severe form. As no 
better place seemed to offer she was retained in the School. She 
died from the effects of a series of violent convulsions, through pul- 
monary congestion, after a few hours' illness. 

The general sanitary- condition of the grounds and buildings has 
been carefully looked after by your Executive Committee and Super- 
intendent. The improved water supply, already far advanced toward 
completion, will contribute further and much needed facilities to 
increase its efficiency. 

In closing, allow me to remark upon the admirable executive 
" personel" of the School. Your Superintendent, his Assistant, the 
several Matrons. and other officers of the Institution have continued to 
manifest the same kindly interest in the care of those under my treat- 
ment. 

Very respectfully yours, 

F, D. Edgertox, M. D. 

*6 Washington Street. 
December ist, 1S81. 



36 



Report of the Visiting Agent. 



The work of industrial training begun at the school is carried for- 
ward by placing out girls, as fast as they become qualified, in suitable 
families. 

Before leaving the school every girl must rise to a certain grade of 
character, which is reached only by good conduct continued for a 
period of time more or less protracted, according to her success in 
overcoming bad habits and adopting better ones. 

The time they spend at the school is not, of course, sufficient for 
them at their age to acquire a thorough knowledge of general house- 
keeping, or to become fixed in a high grade of moral character, but 
it is long enough to divert them from a previous course of idle living, 
and test their disposition to practice prompt obedience, and try to ad- 
just themselves to the daily systematic employment of their time as set 
forth in the Superintendent's Report on page 17. 

Girls in other respects prepared may leave the school at any age ; 
some families prefer the younger pupils, with the definite purpose of 
adopting them, provided their characters prove satisfactory after a fair 
trial, while others prefer the older class on account of their ability to 
render efficient help at once. 

Hitherto the applications for girls so far exceed the number pre- 
pared to go out, that abundant opportunity is given for selecting suit- 
able places. The points which largely influence the choice of situations 
relate to the substantial character of the families without regard to their 
being rich ; provided they are living in thriving circumstances and 
enjoying the advantages of wholesome neighboring influences. 

Wages are not regarded a matter of so much importance to the 
girls as a wise and uniform management on the part of those who 
exercise an active supervision of their daily employment, a manage- 
ment that is not easily disturbed by repeated provocations and dis- 
couragements, and which includes a liberal amount of patience and 



quiet firmness with discriminating ability to bestow appropriate en- 
couragement or exorcise needed restraint, as the case requires. 

Those who undertake this responsibility will have the advantage of 
Support from the institution which holds the legal guardianship and 

control of the girls until they become twenty-one. There is ample 
authority therefore to make and enforce contracts which cannot 
be interfered with by parents or relatives. 

Those who are old enough to earn wages receive from four to ten 
dollars per month. There are at present so placed out in different 
parts of the State *forty girls under twenty-one years of age, and visits 
to their places of residence, from time to time, show that very few 
mistakes have been made in selecting suitable homes. 

Only five have been found the past year from which it was thought 
advisable to remove the girls to other and better places. 

With these exceptions the girls have been found enjoying good op- 
portunities for acquiring such a thorough knowledge of common do- 
mestic duties as will fit them to become useful and self-supporting 
citizens. 

In many cases they appear to be filling the place of children rather 
than that of servants. Those who are too young to render service 
sufficient to meet the expense of their support, appear to be receiv- 
ing the same tender and liberal treatment that daughters of the same 
age usually do in their own homes. Those who are of suitable age 
attend school and share the same common advantages of schooling as 
other children in the district in which they reside. 

In general this system of placing out appears to be working well 
for all parties concerned, when tested by its results as well as obser- 
vation. 

The fact that so few, after leaving, return to the school, is evidence 
of the profitable relations and mutual satisfaction existing between 
the girls and their patrons. Every year the returns are less frequent 
and more often owing to death or other serious changes in the family 
making it necessary, than to any faults of the girls. And further 
the correspondence kept up by the officers of the school, with the 
girls and the families who take them, shows that the girls remember 
and appreciate what has been done for thern at the institution. 



( 



. *There are twenty or twenty-five ^irls, in addition to the forty above 
mentioned, who were committed under the former law and passed from 
our guardinship at eighteen, who still look to the school for counsel and 
protection. They are visited frequently and a regular correspondence 
is continued. 



From the file of letters received the past year, we give two or three 
sample extracts : 

The first from a girl who had not done her best in school. Refer- 
ring to the fact, she writes : 

" I did not see things in their true light then as I do now. If I could 
have the same encouragement and the chances of doing good that you 
once gave me, I would not treat them as I did then. I feel more than 
thankful for all the care and love you gave me. 

" I have not forgotten the Sunday morning you spent with me. You 
showed me a mother's love; and from that moment I learned to love and 
reverence you." 

Another, just past twenty-one, writes: 

" I am going to the Normal School this fall. I am earning money to 
pay my daily car fare. I am living with my aunt. I mean to pay her for 
my board. I think the bread of independence the sweetest. Minnie 
thinks I am right about that. * * * No matter how high I may 
stand in society, I never shall be ashamed to say ' I am an Industrial 
School girl.' If lower than I am now, no one shall ever know where I 
came from." 

From another, prosperously settled in life, the following is received: 

April 8, 1881. 

Dear Mrs. Bond : 

Received yours of the 30th with much pleasure, for it was a pleasure 
to hear from my old Home and friends. * * * Yes, I am married — 
got married very soon after I left the School, almost two years ago. 

Am now a mother, and have a very fine boy baby, Edward. 

Write me all about the School, for I always like to hear about it. I 
should like to make you a visit this summer, and thank you very much 
for your invitation. It will depend on my husband, whether he can get 

away or not. * * * We intend to go back to T to live. We 

have a small farm of sixteen acres of land up there, and intend to build 
a house this summer, so when that is done we shall move away from 
here. * * * 

From a lady, whose husband had recently died, the following was 
received : 

Dec. 26, 1881. 

Mr. Bond. — Dear Sir: Since I was at the School I have made other 
arrangements, and must, with many regrets, let Mary go. I have spent 
many pleasant hours with her. She is ever the same loving, faithful, 
good girl. Especially in my afflictions has she been a comfort to me, 
and, with my husband, we looked on her as a gift from God. I thank 
you for sending her to us. I give her up with sadness. I know she can 



39 

be happy elsewhere, forshe has a joyous nature and possesses the power 
of blessing others. I trust her life may be of great value, * * * 

But enough lias been said and quoted to show that good work is 
being carried on, out of the School as well as in, and still more is 
hoped lor and expected from outside co-operation in future, and we 
welcome the benevolent and active sympathy of all good people in 
the State who are willing to join us and share the gratifying and hope- 
ful work oC assisting neglected girls, through a course of preparation, 
to pass safely from the care of others to the care of themselves. 

Charles Fabriquk, 

J '/siting Agd?if. 



i 

{ 



40 



Appendix A 



STATEMENT RESPECTING THE CONNECTICUT INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 

LOCATION. 

Its location is at Middletown, on the line of the Connecticut Valley, 
and the Air Line, and the Middletown branch of the Hartford and New 
Haven Railroad. Communications relating to it should be addressed to 
the Superintendent of the School. 

PROPER SUBJECTS. 

The proper subjects are not merely paupers, nor orphans, nor con- 
firmed thieves, nor prostitutes, nor other criminals, butviciozisly inclined 
girls between the ages of 8 and 16 years. 

The class includes: 

i. The stubborn and unruly, who refuse to obey those who have the 
proper charge of them. 

2. Truants, vagrants and beggars. 

3. Those found in circumstances of manifest danger of falling into 
habits of vice and immorality. 

4. Those who have committed any offence punishable by fine or im- 
prisonment, or both, other than imprisonment for life. 

The official Report to the General Assembly, made in 1867, shows 
that there are from 300 to 500 in the State. 

PECULIAR FEATURES. 

1. It is not a Stale Institution, but a private charity, incorporated 
and employed by the State for the custody, guardianship, discipline and 
instruction of the aforenamed girls. The State, as the common parent 
and guardian of the community, treats them as minors and wards. 

The School was founded by private charity, and is under the control 
of a self-perpetuating Board of Directors, originally chosen by the donors 
to its funds, together with three ex-officio State Officers. 

For each girl committed to it by legal process, the State pays three 
dollars a week. 



2. Its design is not that of a prison to which criminals arc consij 

for punishment, but that of a temporary place of custody and instruction. 
Its object is prevention and reformation, by giving to the children that 
special physcal, mental, moral, social and industrial training necessary 
to fit them for life, and which they cannot receive elsewhere, except in 
very rare cases. And jus/ SO soon as this is accomplished, and the 
be placed in suitable circumstances elsewhere, their connection with the 
School ceases. 

(See Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry to the General Assembly 
of 1867, and the Second Report of the School.) 

The Supreme Court ol Pennsylvania gave the following decisions at 
the December term, 1828, as the unanimous opinion of the Court in full, 
consisting of Chief Justice Gibson and four Assistant Judges: 

"Per Curiam. The House of Refuge is not a prison, but a school, 
where reformation, and not punishment, is the end. It may, indeed, be 
used as a prison for juvenile convicts, who would else be committed to 
a common jail; and in respect to these, the constitutionality of the act 
which incorporated it stands clear of controversy. It is only in respect 
of the application of its discipline to subjects admitted on the order of a 
court, a magistrate, or the managers of the Alms-house, that a doubt is 
entertaiited. The object of the charity is reformation, by training its in- 
mates to industry, imbuing their minds with principles of morality and 
religion, by furnishing them with the means to earn a living, and, above 
all, by separating them from the corrupting influence of improper asso- 
ciates. To this end, may not the natural parents, when unequal to the 
task of education, or unworthy of it, be superseded by the parens 
Patrice, or common guardians of the community? 

" It is to be remembered that the public has a paramount interest in 
the virtue and knowlege of its members, and that of strict right the 
business of education belongs to it. That parents are ordinarily en- 
trusted with it is because it can seldom be put into better hands; but 
when they are incompetent or corrupt, what is there to prevent the 
public from withdrawing the facilities, held, as they obviously are, at its 
sufferance? 

•'As to an abridgement of indefeasable rights by confinment of the 
person, it is no more than what is borne to a greater or less extent in 
every school, and we know of no natural right to exemption from re- 
straints which conduce to an infant's welfare; nor is there a doubt of 
their application in this particular case. The infant has been snatched 
lrom a course which must have ended in confirmed depravity; and not 
only is the restraint lawful % but it would be an act of extreme cruelty 
to release her from it." 

A similar decision was made by the Supreme Court of Baltimore City 
in 1868, in which the decision of the Pennsylvania Court is quoted and 
indorsed in full. 

• 3. The form of Committal is by a civil rather than a criminal pro- 
cess. Parents, guardians, selectmen, grand jurors, or any two respect- 
able inhabitants of the town where the girl is found, may present a 
written complaint to a Judge of Probate, or of the criminal or police 
court of any city or borough sitting in chambers, or to any justice of 



42 

the peace of the town where the girl is found, who must thereupon take 
cognizance and determine the case. 

The form of Commitment reads: "To the guardianship and control 
of the Institution till she is 21, unless sooner discharged according to 
law." Any two of the Directors may discharge a girl for sufficient 
reasons, or bind her to service, still retaining the right of control pre- 
scribed by law. 

4. The system of discipline and education is specially adapted to the 
condition and wants of the girls. It aims to be as nearly as possible 
that of a well regulated Christian family. Its culture is physical, sani- 
tary, educational, industrial and truly Christian, but not sectarian. 

5. Its History. It was incorporated in 1868, received its first inmates 
January, 1870, was formally opened the 30th of June following, and two 
Homes were occupied in October. 

6. Its present condition.is in the highest degree prosperous and en- 
couraging. It has a beautifully located, well cultivated and stocked 
farm, four large Family Houses, designed for 150 inmates. It has a. 
school building containing three school rooms, a chapel and box factory, 
a superintendent's and farmer's house, two barns and other valuable 
buildings. It has a full and well-organized board of teachers and officers. 
Ninety-three different towns in the State have committed girls to its 
care. The discipline has generally proved salutary and successful. 

Other particulars are given in the reports of the present and previous 
years. 



Form of a Bequest. 

fGlVE to my Executor (or Executors) the sum of Dollars in 
trust, to pay the same in days after my decease to 

the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer 
of the Connecticut Industrial School for Girls, located at 
Middletown, Conn., and incorporated in the year eighteen hundred 
and sixty-eight, to be applied by the Directors of the School to its 
charitable purposes. 






Appendix B. 

BY-LAWS 



CHAPTER I. 

DIRECTORS. 

i. The government of the School shall be vested in a Board of four- 
teen Directors, of which the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, and Secre- 
tary of State shall be Directors, ex-officio. 

2. The term of office of the eleven Directors chosen shall be three 
years, except as hereinafter provided. At the close of the third year 
after their appointment they shall be divided by lot into three classes. 
The full Board of Directors shall then choose, by ballot, three or four 
Directors to serve in the place of the first class, whose places shall then 
become vacant. At the close of the fourth year the Board shall choose 
three or four in the places of the second class. At the close of the fifth 
year, three or four in the place of the third class, and annually thereafter 
in the place of the senior class, whose places shall become vacant upon 
the appointment and qualification of their successors. The Board may 
fill all vacancies occurring during the year, and the retiring members 
shall be eligible for re-election. No Director shall receive compensation 
for his services as a Director, but shall be allowed for his expenses 
incurred in the discharge of such service. 

3. The Directors shall exercise a general supervision over the insti- 
tution, and shall frequently and carefully inspect it in all its departments. 
They shall have power to make, alter or amend all by-laws. They shall 
appoint and regulate the duties and salary of the Superintendent, and 
remove him at their discretion. They shall be the guardians of the 
girls during the period of their commitment (unless otherwise provided 
for) ; shall procure for them suitable employment and instruction while 
at the school, and shall transfer them to suitable private families, or 
other places of abode at the earliest proper period, and shall see that 
they receive equitable and kind treatment from those to whom they are 
committed on leaving the School ; and, in general, the Directors shall 
possess all powers needful in order to the proper discharge of their official 
duties. Four of their number shall constitute a quorum for the trans- 
action of ordinary business, but seven shall be required for the purchase 



1 
( 



u 

and sale of the real estate of the Institution, for the appointment of new 
Directors and of the Superintendent, and for the change of its by-laws. 

4. They shall hold an annual meeting the third Wednesday in 
December, and quarterly meetings the third Wednesday of March, 
June and September. At the annual meeting they shall make a full and 
verified report of their trust, choose a President, Secretary, Treasurer, 
and an Executive Committee, and a Visiting Committee of twelve ladies, 
and transact such other business as the interests of the Institution shall 
demand. 

5. At the quarterly meeting there shall be a careful review of the 
state and management of the Institution, and of the progress and con- 
dition of the inmates. 

6. The President shall call extra meetings at the request of any two 
Directors, and perform all the other duties usually pertaining to his 
office. 

7. The Secretary shall keep a full record of the meetings of the 
Board, prepare such papers as they shall direct, give notice in writing 
to each Director of the time and place of meetings, and communicate 
to the Treasurer the action of the Board in regard to its funds. 

8. The Treasurer shall have charge of the trust funds of the School, 
and give a full report thereof at their annual meeting, and at other 
meetings when required, and shall give such bonds and receive such 
compensation as the Executive Committee shall deem proper. 

9. The Executive Committee shall, when necessary, act for the Board 
during the intervals between its meetings, but shall make no change in 
its plan or discipline without the consent of a majority of the Directors. 
They shall be the especial advisers of the Superintendent, and report 
their doings to the next meeting of the Board. 

10. Two of the Visiting Committee of Ladies shall be requested to 
visit the Institution at least once in two months, and thoroughly inspect 
its domestic arrangements, and report thereof to the Secretary of the 
Board. Their expenses shall be defrayed from the funds of the School. 

CHAPTER II. 

OFFICERS. 

1. The officers of the Institution shall consist of a Superintendent 
and Assistant Superintendent, appointed by the Directors; a Matron 
and Assistant Matron for each Home; a Principal Teacher, a Farmer, 
and such other instructors and assistants as may be found necessary. 

The officers shall be appointed and dismissed, and their salaries reg- 
ulated by the Superintendent, subject to the approval of the Board of 
Directors, at their next subsequent meeting. 

2. They shall reside at the Institution. None of the subordinates 
shall leave it without the permission of the superintendent. All shall 
aid in maintaining the rules and discipline, and give such assistance as 



.',■-> 

shall be necessary in order thereto, and be especially careful to sustain 
each other in the presence of the girls. 

CHAPTER III. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

i. The Superintendent shall have the general charge of the Institu- 
tion ; shall be the executive of the Directors, and see that all their 
instructions and the rules of the School are carried out. 

2. He shall frequently inspect the Institution in all its departments, 
and see that the subordinate officers are punctual and faithful in the 
discharge of their respective duties. 

3. He shall keep a journal, and make record of all occurrences 
worthy of notice, which record shall be subject to the inspection of any 
member of the Board. 

4. He shall perform the correspondence, keeping files of all letters 
received, and copies of those sent, so far as of importance, for reference. 
In suitable books he shall keep regular and complete accounts of all 
receipts and expenditures, and of all property entrusted to his care, 
showing the expenses and income of the Institution. 

5. He shall make out and present to the Comptroller the bills for 
weekly board and other necessary expenses of the girls according to 
to law. 

6. Under the advice and direction of the Executive Committee, he 
shall procure the necessary supplies for the Institution, and purchase all 
such articles and materials as may be wanted for the support and em- 
ployment of the girls, and dispose of all articles raised on the farm, or 
manufactured by them, which are not wanted for use. 

7. At the annual meeting he shall make a report to the Board of 
everything pertaining to the inmates and general state of the School up 
to the 1st of December, and at each quarterly meeting give such infor- 
mation as the Directors require, and at all times be ready to perform 
whatever other duties may be required for the good of the Institution. 

8. In connection with the Executive Committee, he shall decide upon 
all applications for the services of the girls. No inmate shall be per- 
mitted to perform service in a public house, or in a family where spirit- 
uous liquors are used as a beverage, or be indentured to an unmarried 
man. 

9. He shall keep a register of the name and age of each inmate of 
the. Institution, with the date of her admission ; a sketch of her life, 
including her birthplace ; a description of her person ; the name, resi- 
dence, nativity and character of her parents ; by whom committed ; for 
what cause ; when and how discharged ; also a record of her conduct 
while in the Institution, and, as far as possible, after she shall have left it. 



I 



46 

io. Whenever a girl is placed out at service, he shall keep a record 
of the person, residence and employment of the employer, and of the 
service and terms for which she is employed. In case of his receiving 
notice of the ill-treatment of any girl, it shall be his duty at once to ex- 
amine into the case and to take such measures in reference to it as the 
circumstances require. 

ii. The Assistant Superintendent may, by direction of the Superin- 
tendent, perform any of his duties, and in his absence, shall have control 
and supervision of the School. 

CHAPTER IV. 

MATRONS. 

i. A Matron shall be placed over each house, who shall have its 
general superintendence and discipline, and be held responsible for all 
its officers and inmates and management, under the supervision and 
with the advice and aid of the Superintendent. 

2. She shall keep a full record^ of the entrance and leaving, of the 
conduct and improvement of the girls in 'her family, of all work done, 
and of everything necessary to show the state of the Home ; which 
record shall always be open to the inspection of the Superintendent. 
She shall make an annual report to the Directors. 

3. She shall see that cleanliness, order and propriety are maintained 
in all the apartments of her house, and in the person, dress and rooms 
of the inmates, and that suitable care is given to the sick. 

4. She shall endeavor especially to impress upon her charge the 
duty and advantage of a moral and religious, and the evils and miseries 
of a wicked life ; and inculcate all the practical virtues that adorn the 
life and beautify the character. 

5. She shall see that her assistants are diligent and faithful in the 
discharge of their appropriate duties, discreet and regular in their de- 
portment, and strict in their observance of the regulations of the Insti- 
tution, and report any remissness to the Superintendent. 

CHAPTER V. 

ASSISTANT MATRONS. 

i. In each family there shall be an Assistant Matron, who shall have 
charge of the kitchen, laundry or other domestic concerns. 

2. She shall be responsible to the Matron for the cleanliness and 
order of her department, for the conduct, industry and instruction of 
the girls employed with her, and, in the absence of the Matron, shall 
take charge of the Home. 






47 
CHAPTER VI. 

TEACHERS. 

i. The Principal Teacher shall have charge of the discipline and in- 
struction of the school and of the order and cleanliness of the school 
room; she shall have the care of the Library, and be responsible for all 
books and furniture belongingto the school and chapel. She shall render 
in the Home in which she resides such assistance as is necessary for its 
order and discipline. She shall make an annual report. 

2. The Assistant Teachers shall, during school hours, instruct the 
classes assigned to them, and at other times, under the Matron, perform 
such duties as may be appointed to them in the Homes. 

CHAPTER VII. 

FARMER. 

I. The Farmer shall attend to the stock and take proper care of the 
barns, and in winter of the furnaces; shall do the teaming and work of 
the farm so far as he is able, and render the Superintendent any assist- 
ance he may require, not inconsistent with other duties. 

CHAPTER VIII. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

1. The hours of labor, study, rest and recreation shall be arranged 
from time to time by the Superintendent and Matrons. 

2. All persons employed in the Institution, in whatever capacity, are 
required to devote their whole attention to the performance of their 
duties. Each officer shall see that the rules and regulations are fully 
observed. 

3. No inmate shall be permitted to leave the premises, except by 
permission of the Superintendent. 

4. The Institution will be open for visitors each Wednesday, from 
two till five o'clock P. M.; but visitors cannot be admitted to any part 
of the premises, at this or at other times, without the express permission 
of the Superintendent or of his assistant. 

5. Punishment may be inflicted by the deprivation of amusement and 
recreation, by withholding some favorite article of food, or some privi- 
lege or indulgence, by loss of rank and standing in the class, by impos- 
ing some irksome duty, by close or solitary confinement for a limited 
period, and, when it becomes absolutely necessary to maintain good 
order and enforce the rules and regulations of the Institution, by cor- 
poral infliction by the Superintendent, or under his direction, a record 
of the time, manner and circumstances of which punishment shall be 
made. 

6. These By-Laws may be altered, amended or repealed at any reg- 
ular meeting of the Directors. 






48 



mcs 



Appendix C. 

jRelaling to t\\i U/anntttunt Industrial Jjjenool for |jir(s. 



An Act Incorporating the Connecticut Industrial School 

for Girls. 

Resolved by this Assembly: — Sec. i. That James E. English, Wil- 
liam A. Buckingham, Esther Pratt, Timothy M. Allyn, Edmund G. 
Howe, Roland Mather, Alfred Smith, Henry A. Perkins, Francis B. 
Cooley, George Beach, Richard S. Ely, John B. Eldridge, John H. 
Goodwin, James Root, C. C. Lyman, Caroline A. Street, Mary Hillhouse, 
Mary L. Skinner, Jane Hubbard, Hervey Sanford, William W. Board- 
man, Ezra C. Reed, Richard S. Fellowes, Nathan Peck, Charles Fab- 
rique, Cornelius S. Bushnell, Moses Y. Beach, H. D. Smith, Thomas K. 
Fessenden, and their associate subscribers, be, and they are hereby con- 
stituted a body politic and corporate, by the name of "The Connecti- 
cut Industrial School for Girls," and by that name shall have per- 
petual succession, and may sue and be sued, may plead and be im- 
pleaded in the courts of .this State and elsewhere, may have, use or 
change a common seal, may receive, hold or convey any estate, real or 
personal, that may be committed to it, may act as a guardian to the 
person of any girl who, between the ages of eight and * fifteen years, 
shall be committed to its charge according to law, for the physical, 
mental and moral training of such girl, which guardianship of such 
girl shall supersede any other guardianship of parents or guardians 
during the time that such girl is under the charge of this corporation 
and no longer; and may make such by-laws and appoint such officers 
and agents as shall be specified in such by-laws, or as may be necessary 
to carry out the purposes of the corporation; but it shall be provided 
by such laws that the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor and Secretary of 
State shall be ex-oficio of the principal officers of the corporation. 

Sec. 2. The said corporators shall meet for the first time at the call 
of three of the corporators to organize this corporation, adopt by-laws 
and do whatever else may be necessary and proper. 



^Amended to sixteen in 1873. 



Sec. 3. The funds, property and estate which may be granted to or 
held by said corporation for the uses hereinbefore expressed, shall, with 

the income thereof, be exempted from taxation. 

SEC. 4. This resolution may be amended, altered, or repealed, at the 
pleasure of the General Assembly. 

Approved July 27th, 1868. 



General Assembly, May Session, A. I). 1873. 
Am Act Amending the Act Incorporating the Connectici i 
Industrial School for Girls. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 
. Xssembly convened: 

Si CTION 1. The age of Girls committed to the Connecticut Indus- 
trial School for Girls shall he between eight and sixteen years. 

SEC. 2. In addition to the Directors now existing, two other Directors 
shall be annually chosen in the manner provided by law. 

Sec. 3. This act shall take effect from its passage. 

Approved July 1st, 1873. 



Revised Statutes of 1875. 

TITLE VIII.— CHAPTER II. 

Connecticut Industrial School for Girls. 



Section. 

llV/o may be sent to the School. 

When officers may arrest and procure commitment of pirn's. 

Costs, how paid. 

Directors may discharge from School. 

What facts to be endorsed on mittimus. 

Support of girls committed to the School. 

1S6S. 1 -j. Who may be sent to it. 



Sec. 1. The parent or guardian of any girl between the ages of 
eight and sixteen years, or a selectman or grand juror of the town where 
she may be found, may present a written complaint to the judge of the 
Court of Probate for the district in which such town is, or to the judge 
of the Police Court of any city where she may be found, or to any justice 
of the peace of such town, alleging that she has committed any ofl 
within the final jurisdiction of a justice of the peace, or belongs to the 



50 

class specified in the third section of Chapter II. of Title XIV., or in the 
seventh and eighth section of Chapter I. of Title XL, or that she is lead- 
ing an idle, vagrant or vicious life, or is in manifest danger of falling 
into habits of vice, praying that she may be sent to the Connecticut 
Industrial School for Girls, and such judge or justice of the peace shall 
thereupon, after notice to her and such other notice as he may deem 
proper, inquire into said complaint, and on being satisfied of the truth 
of the allegation therein, may order her to be committed to the custody 
of such School until she shall arrive at the age of eighteen* years ; 
unless sooner lawfully discharged, and if he finds that she has commit- 
ted an offense punishable by imprisonment, other than imprisonment 
for life, she may be sentenced to the Connecticut Industrial School for 
Girls, or judgment may be suspended, on such terms, and for such time, 
as he may prescribe; and such authority may issue a warrant for the 
execution of such sentence. 

1868. When Officers may Arrest and Proceed Against Girls. 

SEC. 2. Any proper officer may arrest within his precinct any girl 
whom he may judge to be between the ages of eight and sixteen years, 
whom he shall find in any improper place or situation, and who is, in 
his judgment, liable to be arrested for any of the offenses specified in 
the preceding section, and make complaint and proceed in the same 
manner as a parent could do under the provisions of the preceding- 
section. 

1S70. Payment of Costs. 

Sec. 3. Said authority shall tax the costs on such complaint and 
transmit a certified copy of the items of the same to the clerk of the 
Superior Court for the county in which the trial was held, within thirty 
days after the trial; and if approved by the State's Attorney for such 
county, it shall be paid by said clerk, upon the order of such judge or 
justice. 

Discharge by Directors. 

Sec. 4. The Directors, or any two of them, may discharge from said 
School, and return to her parent or guardian, or to the Selectmen of the 
town, any girl who, in their judgment, ought not to be retained. 

1 8 jo. Age, &•"£., to be Endorsed on Mittimus. 
Sec. 5. The authority committing any girl to said School shall 
ascertain as nearly as possible, and endorse on the mittimus, her age, 
parentage, birthplace, offense, and such other facts relative to her as 
may aid in her proper care and instruction in the School; and the age 
thus ascertained shall be taken as the true age of said girl with refer- 
ence to the term of her commitment. 



•Amended to twenty-one in 1878. 



51 

iS;.f. Support oj in milted lo I he School . 

. 6. There shall be taxed monthlj in each year, l>\ the Com]) 
trailer, not to exceed three dollars a week, tor the n< 
each girl committed to said School, and the Superintendent shall make 
his bill therefor, and present it to the Comptroller, who, upon finding 

the same to DC JUSt, shall allow it, and it shall be paid from the treasury. 

TITLE VIII. CHAPTER V. 
1874. Religious Instruction in Reformatory Schools. 

Si C. 1. Equal privileges shall be granted to clergymen of all religious 
denominations to impart religious instruction to the inmates of the 
schools mentioned in Chapters I. and II. of this title; and every oppor- 
tunity shall be allowed such clergymen to give such inmates, belonging 
to their respective denominations, such religious and moral instruction 
as they may desire ; and the trustees of each of said institutions shall 
prescribe resonable times and places, not inconsistent with its proper 
management, when and where such instructions may be given, which 
shall be open to all who may choose to attend. 

1868. Inmates of Reformatory Schools may be Bound out as 
Apprentices. 

Sec. 2. The Trustees of the State Reform School may bind out as 
apprentices, and the Directors of the Connecticut Industrial School for 
Girls may bind out to service persons committed to such schools respect- 
ively, for a term not exceeding the term of their commitment. 

1868. Parent or Guardian may indenture Child to Reforma- 
tory School. 

Si c. 3. Any parent or guardian may indenture a child or ward to 
the State Reform School, or to the Connecticut Industrial School for 
Girls, on such uniform terms as may be agreed between such parent or 
guardian and the trustees or directors of said schools, the expense to be 
paid quarterly, in advance ; and in case of any failure on the part of 
such parent or guardian so to pay said expense, the Superintendent of 
said State Reform School, or Connecticut Industrial School for Girls, as 
the case may be, may sue on such agreement. 

1874. Privileges of Child Indentured to a Reformatory School. 

. 4. Every child indentured or admitted to the State Reform S< hool 

or the Connecticut Industrial S. hool for Girls, shall be entitled to the 



same supervision, medical treatment, support and education, and sub- 
ject to the same regulations, employment and restraint as all its other 
inmates. 

iSyo. Sentence of Girls may be in the Alternative. 

Sec. 5. The Sentence of any girl to the Connecticut Industrial School 
for Girls, may be in the alternative, as in the case of sentences to the 
State Reform School. 

TITLE XL— CHAPTER I. 

1869. Arrest of Vagrant Girls. 

Sec. 14. Upon the request of the parent or guardian of any girl be- 
tween eight and sixteen years of age, a warrant may be issued for her 
arrest in the same manner and on the same conditions as provided in 
the preceding sections with respect to boys ; and thereupon the same 
proceedings may be had as are above provided, except that said girls 
may be committed to the Connecticut Industrial School for Girls. 

TITLE XX.— CHAPTER V. 

i8?o. 1874. 18/6. Assisting in Escape from Industrial or Reform 

Schools. 

Sec. 6. Every person who shall aid or abet any girl in escaping from 
the Connecticut Industrial School for Girls, or any boy from the State 
Reform School for Boys, or who shall knowingly harbor such boy or girl, 
or aid in abducting them from .persons to whose care and service they 
have been properly committed, shall be fined not less than fifty nor more 
than one hundred dollars, or imprisonment for not more than sixty days. 

General Assembly, January Session, A. D. 1878. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 
Assembly convened : — 

That Section I., Chapter II., Title VIIL, of the Revised Statutes re- 
lating to the Connecticut Industrial School for Girls be, and the same is 
hereby, altered and amended by striking out in the fifteenth and six- 
teenth lines of said section, the words " custody of such school until she 
shall arrive at the age of eighteen years," and inserting in lieu thereof 
the words, " to the guardianship and control of such school until she 
shall arrive at the age of twenty-one years." 

And also by adding at the end of said section the words~ following: 
"But this act shall not be construed so as to deprive any girl of twelve 
years of age and upwards from the privilege of choosing her own guar- 
dian, with the approval of the Court ot Probate, as now provided by 
law." 

Approved March 27, 1878. 



1 1 B P ORT 



DIRECTORS 



OF the 



Connecticut %U\k Wm\\ 



OENKIR^lL ASSEMBLY. 



JANUARY SESSION, 1882. 



Printed by Order of the Legislature. 



HARTFORD: 
PRESS OF WILEY, WATERMAN & EATON. 

1882. 



I 



OFFICE IIS. 

Directors. 

FRANCIS WAV!, AND, Nkw IIavkn. 

THOMAS McMANUS, Hartford. 

JOHN II. LEEDS, New IIavkn. 

HENRY T. SPERRY, Hartford. 

LEWIS WIUTMom:. Rocky Hell. 

NATHAN M. BELDEN, - Wilton. 

CYRUS B. NEWTON. Stafford. 

Warden, 
AUGUSTUS SARGENT. 

Deputy Warden, 
EDWARD O. PECK. 

Chaplain, 
AMASA HOWARD. 

Physician, 
A. S. WARNER, M. D. 



8teu 

D.J. CHAMPUN. 



Gate Keeper, 
WILBUR L. BOTELLE. 



Hall Keeper, 
JOHN C. POND. 

Overseers, 



Josepfi T. Gorton, Shop No. 1, 
Wm B. DrBlois, Shop No. 2. 
Jambs II. Bulblby, shop No 3, 



Coas. L. Whjtmobb, Shop No. 4, 

QSOBGB E. Haisdkn. Shop N 
Ralph F. Hills, Shop No. 6. 



William W. Peck, 
Geo. E. WADSWORTH, 
Jambs P. Cabi 



Watcl 



William W. Scovili k. 
w. s. pomeroy, 
IIknkv (t. Rislby. 



Horace Fenton. 



Night UV 



L. ML HoRTON. 



Matron, 
Mbb. Addie L. Carfehtbb. 



$tatr of Connfrtirut. 



DIRECTORS' REPORT. 



To the Honorable General Assembly of the State of 
Connecticut, January Session, A. D. 1882 : 

The Directors of the State Prison respectfully submit 
thf following report : 

The General Assembly at its session of 1881, appropri- 
ate! two thousand dollars for necessary repairs upon the 
Prison premises. As indicated in our last report, the 
house occupied by the Chaplain required immediate 
alteration, at an estimated expense of five hundred dol- 
lar-. But on careful examination it was found that in 
order to secure a safe foundation the old walls must be 
entirely removed. This called for an unexpected outlay 
both for labor and materials, and made it impossible to 
complete the requisite alterations without exceeding the 
amount appropriated. 

The walls of the rear pari of th< j house have been carried 
to the same height as the main building, four commodious 
bed rooms, and a suitable woodshed have been added, 
and the kitchens have been so remodeled as to be much 
more convenient. 

Bast of the main Prison, an eight-inch cement tile 
sewer about eleven hundred feet Long, and a four-inch 
sewer eighty feet Long, have been constructed almost 
wholly by convict labor. Fences and roofs have been put 
in order, chimneys repointed, and many minor repairs 
ssary for the proper preservation <>f tie* Prison build- 
ings have been made. 



6 eepoet of the, dieectoes [January, 

In these repairs and additions the sum of $2,235.23 has 
been expended, being $226.32 in excess of the amount 
appropriated and the balance of $8.91 left over from last 
year. The deficiency has been met from the earnings of the 
Prison and charged to the general expense account. 

Your attention is respectfully called to the necessity of 
further expenditure on the premises. Several chimneys 
require rebuilding, and the roof on the east end of the 
chapel should be renewed during the coming year. It 
is estimated that these repairs, together with needed work 
on roofs and fences, as well as painting, glazing, &c, &c, 
will call for an appropriation of about a thousand dollars. 

The income of the Prison from all sources during the 
year has been $27,093.64, while the expenses have been 
$32,353.45, leaving a deficiency of $5,259.81. 

It is not difficult to account for this deficiency. In the 
first place, while there has been no material decline in the 
prices of any necessary supplies since our last report, 
there has been in some considerable items an advance of 
from fifteen to thirty-five per cent. 

Again, the average number of prisoners has been eleven 
less than the average of the previous year. Indeed, the 
number has not been so small since 1874. And lastly, an 
unusual amount of illness has prevailed in the Prison, 
diminishing the labor of the working inmates to the ex- 
tent of 1,654 days. Of this diminution, about three- 
fourths, (or, in exact figures, 1,250 days), can be traced di- 
rectly to the influence of malaria. While this trouble 
has been steadily increasing for several years, it has never 
before assumed such alarming proportions. The evil is 
two fold. It not only imposes serious pecuniary loss 
upon the State, but inflicts much suffering upon the con- 
victs, and in many cases sows the seeds of permanent 
weakness, if not positive physical disability. In our last 
report, we alluded to this matter as follows : "Another 
cause contributing to reduce the receipts of the past year 
has been an unusual amount of sickness of a malarial 
type, which though not of a fatal or very serious charac- 
ter, has incapacitated a considerable percentage of our 



1882.1 OF Tin: riiwivTii i i STATE PR] 7 

working force from labor for several consecutive days, 
amounting in the aggregate to an item of no small magni- 
tude." 

In view of the tact that the hygienic condition of our 
Prison, at least so tar as malaria! sickness ie concerned, 
rapidly deteriorating for years, hasal last reached a point 
which must awaken the gravest apprehensions, an inves- 
tigation into tin* causes is plainly demanded by every 
dictate of justice and humanity. While th«' inmates 
tin- Prison who are suffering the penalty of violated law 
have forfeited their right to freedom, they are surely en- 
titled to pass their confinement under circumstances not 
unfavorable to health. The State is as much hound to 
furnish them with wholesome food, adequate exercise, 
clean, commodious and well ventilated cells, as they, on 
their part, are hound to render prompt obedience to 
Prison regulations. If they are mentally diseased to such 
an extent as to be beyond the reach of proper treatment 
within prison walls, the State has wisely decreed by leg- 
islative enactment, that they shall be removed to an insti- 
tution where they can receive such competent medical 
car.- as their unfortunate condition requires. There would 
seem to be no escape from the application of the Bame 
principle to their physical ailments. That is to say. if. to 
a Large and constantly increasing extent, their health is 
seriously impaired in consequence oi' inherent defects in 
Prison construction or situation, or both, these defects 
should be remedied, either by a reconstruction of the 
building, or if this [a for any reason impracticable or un- 
desirable, then by the removal of the convicts to a new 
Prison on a new site where due provision can be made for 
their sanitary welfare. 

This subject 18 not now for the first time brought to the 
notice of the General Assembly. At the May session, 
1871, "Commissioners on State Prison matters" were 
appointed by the Governor under a legislative resolution. 
Among the Bubjects which they were expected to consider 
and report upon u connected with our State Prison," 
was "its sanitary and hygienic condition." The com- 



8 report of the directors [January, 

missioners " made repeated and careful examinations of 
the condition and management of the State Prison, at 
Wethersfield, visited various penal and reformatory insti- 
tutions in other States," and as the result of their investi- 
gations, submitted an extended report to the General 
Assembly of 1872. 

, After speaking of the great advance in prison construc- 
tion which the institution at Wethersfield marked over 
" the barbarism of the Simsbury copper mines," and the 
fact that for several years it held the first place among 
penal establishments in this country, the Commissioners 
say: " Since that time there has been a great change in 
the public mind in regard to the duty of society to those 
convicted of crime, and the necessity of efforts to prevent 
the increase of crime and the growth of a criminal class ; 
and experiments have already made it clear that the inter- 
ests of society and of the criminals demand very essen- 
tial modifications of the system that was forty years ago, 
a great advance upon previous theory and practice.* 

Even if the Prison building at Wethersfield had not 
become impaired by the action of time, it would need 
very great alterations to make it what the enlightened 
Christian sentiment of to-day demands that a Prison 
should be. But it is in a decayed and bad condition ; and 
the Commissioners, who began with the idea that it might 
be repaired and modified to suit modern ideas, have come 
to the decided conclusion, that the State needs a new 
Prison on a more favorable site." 

Among the reasons which they assign for this. opinion, 
are the following : " the chief defects in the block of cells 
occupied by the men, cannot be remedied in this Prison. 
The cells are three feet and a half in width by seven in 
length, and about seven feet in height. They should be 
five feet by eight, and eight feet high at least. They are 
without ventilation, the little orifices in the rear failing to 
show any current of air when a lighted match is held in 
them. The lower tier is damp, especially in the summer, 

♦This principle has been distinctly recognized everywhere in New England but in Connec- 
ticut; in every other State a new Prison having been erected, or the old one enlarged and 
materially improved, within the past fifteen yeiirs. 



1882.] OF THE CONNECTICUT BTATE PRISON. 9 

and this is perhaps unavoidable from the location of the 
Prison, though its condition might doubtless be impro 
by a good system ^\' under drainage. The bottom of the 
cellar, in which we have sometimes found water standing, 
is only a Little, if at all, above the level of the highest 
water in the Wethersfield Cove. The corridors are some- 
what too narrow. In the morning, after the cells have been 
occupied by one hundred and ninety men for the night* 
the effluvia in the cells and in the corridor is reported to 
be exceedingly offensive." 

In summing up their report, the Commissioners con- 
clude with three recommendations, one of which is : " the 
erection as speedily as may be, of another State Prison in 
a different and better place." 

Since this report was published, some changes have 
been made in the internal arrangements of the Prison, 
particularly in the Warden's apartments and the female 
convict quarters. The cardinal defects of construction, 
however, the small, damp, dark, ill ventilated cells, the 
utterly inadequate provision for lodging the subordinate 
officers, and the malarial conditions of the site of the 
Prison still remain. 

As to location, it would seem too obvious for argument, 
that the Prison should be on ground high enough to se- 
cure good air and natural drainage, and to be free from 
miasmatic exhalations. It needs no expert to tell us that 
the present site combines with almost ideal completeness, 
every unfavorable feature which can be well conceived of 
for such an institution. As to the buildings, it may be 
observed, in addition to what we have already said, that 
their construction renders impossible any system of j 
elation in punishment, and compels the Prison officials to 
content themselves with modes of discipline and police 
lations, which in the best Prisons of our day are con- 
sidered unnecessary and harmful. 

gain, it may be fairly estimated, judging from the ex- 
perience of recent years, and reckoning <>n the natural 
decay and deterioration of the premises, that an av< 
annual outlay of at least two thousand dollars will be 
2 * 



10 report of the directors [January, 

necessary to maintain the Prison and its dependencies in 
even their present deplorable condition. 

These and other considerations, which might be almost 
indefinitely extended, have forced us to the unanimous 
conclusion, in which we are cordially supported by all the 
officials who are brought into constant contact with the 
convicts, that a new and improved prison, in a wholesome 
and convenient location, is imperatively demanded by 
every motive which can appeal to the dignity, the human- 
ity, or the justice of the State. 

From this somewhat gloomy picture, we turn with plea- 
sure to the conduct record of the year. In our last re- 
port we were able to give the number of punishments 
since the appointment of the present Warden, as dimin- 
ished more than thirty -three per cent, when compared 
with the corresponding previous period. During the 
twelve months just closed, this most creditable diminu- 
tion has been very largely increased. Indeed, for a period 
of four consecutive months no punishment was inflicted. 

An unprecedented proportion of prisoners has earned 
the full deduction of time provided by statute for good 
behavior, while the labor of those who were not disabled 
by illness has been cheerfully and effectively performed. 

This has not resulted from the slightest relaxation of 
discipline, or from accidental or temporary causes. It 
has been due to the habit of obedience engendered by t*he 
steady and impartial enforcement of reasonable regula- 
tions, at the hands of officers who have known how to 
make their authority respected, without descending to 
acts of petty tyranny. We desire to say in this connection, 
that the Warden, Deputy Warden, and other officials 
have discharged their varied and responsible duties, in a 
manner which calls for warm commendation, and that, in 
our judgment, the morale of the institution could not well 
be improved under the many discouraging circumstances 
incident to an .old, inconvenient and ill arranged prison. 

The Sabbath afternoon exercises have been continued 
during the year, — under the active supervision of our as- 



i 



L882. in a done kotioi d state pr] i i 

■Me Henry r r. s perry, Esq., and have been, as hereto- 
fore, productive of the happiest results. 

The reports of the Warden, Chaplain and Physician, 
are herewith submitted. 

FRANCIS WAYLAND, President. 
THOMAS McMANUS, Secretary. 
JOHN H. LEEDS, 
HENRY T. SPERRY, 
LEWIS WHITMORE, 
NATHAN M. BELDEN. 
CYRUS B. NEWTON. 

Wktiikrsfield, November 30, 1881. 



WARDEN'S REPORT. 



To the Directors of Connecticut State Prison : 

Gentlemen : 

The Warden of the State Prison, respectfully submits 
the following statement of the transactions of the Prison, 
showing the amount of income and expenditures, the 
number of prisoners in confinement, and how employed, 
together with the usual financial and statistical tables. 

There were in confinement December 1, 1880, two hun- 
dred and sixty-one (261) prisoners; and there has been 
committed to the Prison during the year, one hundred and 
five, (105) One hundred and twenty-nine, (129) have been 
released, leaving in confinement at the close of the fiscal 
year, two hundred and thirty -seven (237) prisoners. 

Of the one hundred and five (105) received during the 
year, one hundred and two (102) were convicted in the 
Superior Courts of the State, and three (3) by the United 
States District Court. 

Of the one hundred and twenty-nine (129) released dur- 
ing the year, there were discharged by expiration of. sen- 
tence, one hundred and eleven (111) ; pardoned by reso- 
lution of the General Assembly, five {5), pardoned by the 
Honorable Secretary of the Navy, three (3), transferred 
to the General Hospital for the Insane, four (4) ; one (1) 
was granted a new trial, and five (5) have died. 

The highest number in confinement at any onetime was 
two hundred and sixty one, (261), and the lowest two 
hundred and fifteen (215). The average was two hundred 
and thirty eight (238), which is eleven Less than the aver- 
age for the previous year. 



14 report of the direotors [January, 

The income from . all sources is twenty seven thousand 
ninety -three and T Vo dollars, ($27,093.64), and the expen- 
ses of the Prison have been thirty two thousand three 
hundred and fifty three and T \% dollars ($32,353.45), show- 
ing a deficiency of five thousand two hundred fifty-nine 
and T Vo dollars ($5,259.81). 

The cost of provisions, including expense of fuel for 
cooking, the labor of prisoners employed in kitchen, and 
salary and board of Steward, is fifty and T f ff dollars 
($50.04), per year per prisoner, or 13 T \\ cents per day. 

The cost for clothing and bedding, including expense 
of manufacture, and salary and board of matron, also 
clothing furnished discharged prisoners, is fifteen and r ^ 
dollars ($15.01), per year per prisoner, or 4 T l v \ cents per 
day. 

The total cost for maintaining the Prison per prisoner, 
per year, is one hundred thirty-five and T V<> dollars 
($135.94), or 37 T %\ cents per day. 

As regards the moral and sanitary condition of the 
Prison, I would refer you to the reports of the Chaplain 
and Physician. 

1 take pleasure in testifying to the faithful and satisfac- 
tory manner in which all the officers have discharged their 
responsible duties. 

Very respectfully, 

AUGUSTUS SARGENT, Warden. 

Wethersfield, November 30, 1881. 



) 



1882. I OF Tin-: OONNEOTOOUT 9TATB PRH Lfi 

FINANCIAL TABLES. 



INCOME. 

SHOE SHOPS. 

Received for work done, . . . $25,147. 53 

Stock on hand November 30, 1881, . 88.35 $25,235.88 

Stock on hand November 30, 1880, . 86.75 

$25,149.13 

PROFIT AND LOSS 

Received from visitors the past year, .... $1,058.94 

BOARD ACCOUNT. 

Received for board of United States prisoners, . . $885.57 



EXPENDITURES. 



EXPENSE ACCOUNT. 



Stock on hand November 30, 1880, . $7,374.33 
Salaries of officers, .... 13,452.03 
Repairs and improvements charged this account. 226.32 
Board of officers, lights, fuel and incidental ex- 
penses, 7,765.02 $28,818.60 

Sundry credits to this account, . . . 815.66 

Stock on hand November 30, 1881, . . 7,838.94 8,654.60 

$20,164.00 

CLOTHING AND BEDDING. 

Stock on hand November 30, 1880, $3,142.63 

Amount since purch .... 2,272.36 15,414.99 

Sundry credits to this account, 

Stock 'on hand November 30, 1881, . 3,190.63 3,246.26 

: 68.73 



16 



report of the directors [January, 



PROVISIONS. 

Stock on hand November 30, 1880, 
Amount since purchased, 

Sundry credits to this account, 
Pork and pigs sold from this account, 
Received from Comptroller, income from 

" Dorsey Fund " for annual roast dinner, 
Stock on hand November 30, 1881, 



hospital. 

Stock on hand November 30, 1880, 
Amount since purchased, 
Physician's salary, . 

Stock on hand November 30, 1881, 



TRANSPORTATION OF CONVICTS. 

Paid for transporting convicts from the several 
county jails during the year, 



$1,439.18 




10,059.96 


$11,499.14 


172.08 




549.79 




100.00 




1,667.61 


$2,490.08 




$9,009.06 


$175.00 




645.76 




250.00 


$970.76 




175.00 



$795.76 



$215.90 



RECAPITULATION 

INCOME. 



Shoe shops, .... 


$25,149.13 


Profit and loss (visiting fees), 


. . . 1,058.94 


Board account, .... 


. , . 885.57 


Expense above income, 


5,259.81 




$32,353.45 


EXPENSES. 


Expense Account, 


$20,164.00 


Clothing and bedding account, 


2,168.73 


Provision account, 


9,009.06 


Hospital account. 


795.76 


Transportation of convicts, 


215.90 



$32,353.45 



18 



report of the direotors [January, 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



Paid Joseph H. Skaats for tinning on roofs, 
E. Taylor & Son for lumber, 
T. Sisson & Co. for paints, oil, lead, brushes, &c 
Francis & Co. for hardware, nails, &c, 
Clark & Co. for iron, 
Coburn & Gale for lime, cement and tile, 
C. C. Goodrich, agent, for lot of stone, 
J. W. Cone for oak lumber, 
Michael Sheedy for mason work and stone, 
Edward Lawler for plumbing material, 
J. W. Starkweather & Co. for lumber, 
H. & L. W. Butler for use of oxen hauling stone, 
Peter Amerman for repairs on boiler, 
H. R. Gridley for sash and doors, 
H. A. Bailey for sand and hauling same, 
Philip Sargent for painting, 
Hart, Merriam & Co. for house paper, 
Hartford Cement Tile Co. for tile, 
Lewis Whitmore for carpenter work, 
Olds & Whipple for conductor pipe, 
Sundry small accounts, 






$13.20 

633.55 

116.43 

152.77 

47.34 

102.05 

210.00 

16.85 

387.40 

30.14 

2205 

22.50 

8.00 

74.05 

38.50 

25.00 

12.38 

136.98 

132.73 

38.64 

14.67 

$2,235.23 






18S2.] OF THE CONNECTICl I 9TATE PRISON. 19 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



Received from the State Treasurer on resolution of General 

:nl)lv, January Session, A D. 1881, . . $2,000.00 

Amount expended from earnings of prison and charged to 

expense account, . . . . . . . 2 '2 6. 32 

Unexpended balance, fiscal year ending November 30, 

1880, 8.91 



$2,235.23 



20 report of the directors [January, 



GENERAL SUMMAET. 



Paid for advertising petitions for pardon, by- 
order of General Assembly. . . $8.80 

Paid for benefit of Prison Library, by order of 

General Assembly, . . . . 211.35 

Paid for repairs and improvements, by order of 

General Assembly, 2,008.91 

Amount of property on hand as per inventory- 
November 30, 1880, .... 

Amount of property on hand as per inventory 
November 30, 1881, .... 

Due from the prison November 30, 1880, 
Due from the prison November 30, 1881, 

Expenses above income for fiscal year ending 
November 30, 1881, 

$8,304.75 

Received from State Treasurer for repairs and 
improvements, by resolution of General 
Assembly, $2,000.00 

Received from State Treasurer for benefit of 

Prison Library, . . . . 200.00 

Received from State Treasurer to defray cur- 
rent expenses, . . . . . 4,500.00 

Received from State Treasurer, balance of 

deficiency for fiscal year 1880, . . 1,548.23 

Book Accounts November 30, 1880, . . $495.05 

Book Accounts November 30, 1881, . . 438.53 56 52 

$8,304.75 



$12,217.89 




12,900.53 


742.64 


991.01 




917.77 


73.24 




5.259 81 



1882.] of the connecticut state prison. 91 

Warden's Offi< 
Connecticut State Pbiso 

Wethsr8Field, December 2, 1881. 

We hereby certify that the vain.' of the State Prison 
property November 30, L881, as appraised by us. i 

follows, viz. : 

Real >mprising - Prison buildings, with 

Warden's house and about eighteen acres of land, $170,000.00 
Personal property, consisting of furniture, clothing and 
bedding, provisions, hospital stores, live stock, 
vehicles, tools, fuel, &c, &c, .... 12,960.53 

[Signed,] J. H. BARTHOLOMEW, [ Appraisers 
J. G. ADAMS, [ under oath. 



Wetiiersfield, December 2, 1881. 
Hartford County, ss. 

Personally appeared J. H. Bartholomew and J. G. 
Adams, and made oath that they have justly appraised 
the property of tin- State of Connecticut, and situate in 
Wethersiield, according to the true value thereof in 
money, and to the best of their ability, before me. 

ALBERT H. GrALPIN, 

Justice of the Peace. 



Warden's Offick. 
Connecticut State Prisox. 
Wetiiersfield, Conn., December 28, 1881. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the annual 
accounts of %the Warden of the Connecticnt State Prison, 
and compared the vouchers therewith, for the year end- 
ing November 30th, 1881, and and them correct 

R. W. PARMER, ) 

THOMAS J. RAYMOND, ) Au ll 



22 



report of the directors [January, 



STATISTICAL TABLE. 



Number of Prisoners in Confinement December 1, 1880, since 
Received, Deaths, Discharged, &c. 



Whole number in confinement December 1, 1880, 
Since received, ...... 



Discharged by expiration of sentence, 

" " order of General Assembly, . 

" u u Secretary of Navy, 

Transferred to Insane Hospital, . 

Died, 

Discharged by order of Court, New trial granted 



261 
105 

111 
5 



366 



3 
4 
5 
1 129 



Leaving in confinement Dec. 1. 1881, 



237 



Of this number there are for first offense, . 

" " " second offense, 

" " " third offense, . 

" " " fourth offense, 

" fifth offense, . 



192 

37 

6 

1 

1 



Numbers received from i 


EACH 


COUNTY. 




Fairfield County, 


. 78 


Hartford County, 














42 


Litchfield County, . 














. 21 


Middlesex County, . 














14 


New Haven County, 














39 


New London County, 














13 


Tolland County, 














7 


Windham County, . 














14 


United States Navy, 














2 


United States District Cou 


rt, . 












7 



237 



237 



1882.] 



OF TIN I 1 [OUT ST \ 1 K PRISON. 



28 



TlIK ONE Hl'NDRFD AND F1VK RECEIVED DCRINO TIIK YKAR ENDING 
NOVEMBER 30, 1881, WKHK KROM 

30 New Londoo Countj, 8 

. 18 Tolland County . 3 

8 Windham County, . 7 
8 United States District 

. 20 Court. . . 3 



Fairfield County, . 
Hartford County, . 
Litchfield Comity, . 
Middlesex County, . 
New Haven County, 



COLOR AND SEX. 



White males, . . . . . . . .198 

White females, ........ 4 

Colored males, . .35 



105 



237 





NATIVITY. 




Americans, 






. 193 


Foreigners, 






44 




NATIVITY. 




Connecticut, 


. 97 


Virginia, . 


1 


District of Columbia, . 


3 


Maryland, . 


1 


Illinois, 


1 


Canada, 


3 


Kentucky, 


•> 


England, 


6 


Louisiana, . 


1 


France, 


1 


Maine, . 


2 


Germany, . 


8 


icbnseits, . 


16 


Ireland, 


25 


New Jersey, 


4 


Italy, 


2 


New York, 


48 


Prussia, 


1 


North Carolina, . 


2 


St. Helena, 


I 


Ohio, .... 


2 


Nova Scotia, 


1 


Pennsylvania, 


3 


Scotland, . 


1 


Rhode Island, 


2 


Sweden, 


1 


South Carolina, . 


2 








AGES WHEN COMMITTED. 

Under 20 years of age, 

. 20 to 30 years of age, 
From 30 to 40 years of age, 
From 40 to 50 years of 
Over 50 years of age, 



24 
114 

20 

16 



237 



237 






24 



report of the directors [January, 



CRIMES. 










Assault with intent to kill, ...... 5 


Assault with intent to kill, and burglary, 








3 


Adultery, ..... 








1 


Arson, ..... 










•2 


Assault with intent to rob, 










3 


Attempt to rape, 










. . 5 


Bigamy, 










3 


Breaking and entering, 










2 


Burning a dwelling, . 










2 


Breaking a dwelling house, 










4 


Breaking Jail, .... 










2 


Breaking into a Post Office, 










2 


Burglary and theft, . 










6 


Burglary, ..... 










52 


Counterfeiting, 










2 


Carnal abuse of female child, 










1 


Forgery, 










4 


Horse stealing. 










. 23 


Horse stealing, theft and burglary, 










1 


Murder, ..... 










1 


Murder commuted, . . 










2 


Murder, second degree, 










25 


Manslaughter, .... 










6 


Placing obstructions on railroad track 










1 


Passing counterfeit money, 










3 


Perjury, 










2 


Robbery, .... 










3 


Rape, ...... 










14 


Statutory burglary, . 










5 


Statutory arson, 










3 


Theft, 










21 


Theft from the person, 










20 


Tramps, 










5 


United States Navy prisoners, . 










2 


Uttering and forging false draft, 










1 



237 



1882.] 



OF THE CONNECTICUT STATE PBH 



25 





SENTENCES. 










For 6 months, . 


6 


For 


4 years, 


18 


" I year, 


18 


<( 


4 years 6 months, 


1 


" 1 year, 2 months, 


1 


11 


5 years, 


G 


11 1 year, 3 months, 


I 


it 


5 years, $1.00 fine, 2 


11 1 year, 4 months, 


1 


ii 


(i years, 


7 


11 1 year, 6 months, 


6 


ii 


6 years, $1.00 fine, 1 


" 2 years, 


58 


" 


7 years, 


8 


11 2 years, $1.00 fine, . 


1 


»' 


9 years, 


2 


" 2 years, 1 month, 


1 


ii 


10 years, 


6 


" 2 years, 3 months, 


1 


II 


10 years, $500. fine, 1 


" "2 years, 4 months, 


1 


II 


10 years, $100. fine, 1 


11 2 years, 6 months, 


6 


(( 


10 years, $1.00 fine, 1 


" 2 yrs. G mth's, $1.00 fine, 1 


II 


12 years, 


1 


" 3 years, 


32 


II 


15 years, 


.' 4 


" 3 years, $1 00 fine, . 


3 


II 


25 years, 


1 


" 3 years, 6 months, 


4 


II 


Life, . 


36 




OCCUPATION. 




Males employed on contract, 


(able bodied), 


. 166 


Males employed on contract, 


(secon 


d cla 


ss), 






14 


Males employed in kitchen and bakery, 










10 


Males employed outside, . 




. 










3 


Hospital nurse and assistant, 




. 










2 


State shoemaker, 




. 










1 


M carpenter, 




• 










1 


u cooper, 














I 


11 bookbinder, 




. 






• 




1 


" barber, 




. 










1 


" blacksmith, 














1 


" mason, 




. 










1 


Males employed in sewing room, 


. 










2 


Females " " " 


and laundr^ 


& 






4 


Shop waiters, . 




• 










7 


Hall waiters, . 














5 


Iiisane, .... 




. 










3 


Invalids, .... 




. 










6 


Aged and crippled, . 




. 










4 


Lumpers and tramp-. 














4 



237 






26 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS 



[Jan uary, 



PRISONERS UNDER SENTENCE FOR LIFE. 



NAMES. • 


O 


WHERE 
CONVICTED. 


WHEN 
CONVICTED. 


NATIVITY. ; 


CRIME. 


Stephen Abbott, 


52 


New Haven, 


Jan. 15, 1869, 


Connecticut, Murder. 


Isaac Randolph, 


45 


'• 


Julv 16, 1856. 


Pennsylvania, Murder com. 


Frederick Hall, 


32 


Litchfield, 


July 19, 1871. 


Mass., 


41 


John Warren, 


21 


Tolland, 


Dec. 14, 1859. 


Connecticut, Murder 2d deg. 


James Cuff, 


33 


Brooklyn, 


Nov. 22, 18G0. 


Ireland, " 


44 


Charles E. Gilbert, 


25 


Hartford, 


Mav 4, 1865, 


Connecticut, " 


44 


Joel W. Perkins, 


54 


Litchfield, 


April 28, 1868, 


Connecticut, 4i 


ii 


Mitehel Cherest, 


20 


Hartford, 


May 11, 1872. 


Mass., M 


44 


John Dynes, 


19 


14 


Sept. 28, ls?3, 


Connecticut, ' 


«i 


Oscar B. Graves, 


18 


41 


Sept. 23, 1873, 


Connecticut, 4 


it 


Elihu 13. Spear, 


62 


44 


Dec. 9, 1874, 


Pennsylvania, 4< 


44 


William Erwin, 


17 


New Haven, 


May 14. 1875, 


Connecticut, l 


ii 


Christopher Fagan, 


22 


44 


May 14, 1875, 


New York, 


44 


D wight F. Steere, 


28 


Norwich, 


April 24, 1876, 


Mass.. ' 


ii 


Robert L. Espy, 


55 


Hartford, 


Sept. 6, 1877, 


Ireland, ' 


44 


Geo lire Allen. 


33 


Bridgeport, 


Sept. 7, 1877, 


Connecticut, i ' 


44 


Patrick Lynch, 


38 


New Haven, 


Oct. 26, 1877, 


Ireland, 4 


44 


Lorena Alexander, 


44 


Bridgeport, 


Nov. 8, 1878, 


New York, 4 


44 


Michael McNamara. 


45 


14 


Sept. 23, 1878 


Ireland. ' 


ii 


Kate M. Cobb, 


31 


Norwich, 


Jan. 17, 1879, 


Connecticut, ' 


it 


Frank Bassett, 


±4 


Bridgeport, 


Mch. 1, 1879 


Connecticut, 4 


44 


•John H. Davis. 


27 


Hartford, 


April 3, 1879, 


Mass., ' 


44 


Wesley W. Bishop, 


33 


Norwich, 


May 30, 1879. 


Connecticut, 


ii 


Jefferson Ellis, 


34 


rtaddam, 


Dec. 12, 1879, 


New York, ' 


44 


William Allen, 


36 


Hartford, 


April 17, 1880, 


Maine, 4 


44 


William Buckholz, 


25 


Bridgeport, 


June 1, 1880, 


Germany, 4 


44 


Henry Kinghorn, 


46 


Hart lord, 


Mch. 12, 1881, 


Scotland, ' 


44 


George French, 


32 


New Haven, 


Oct, 13, 1881, 


Connecticut, ' 


44 


John Hawley, 


30 


Danbury, 


Oct. 21, 1868, 


Connecticut, Rap< 




George Hudson, 


31 


New Haven, 


Sept. 28, 1869, 


St. Helena, 4l 




Charies Walton, 


23 


Litchfield, 


Feb. 1, 1871, 


New York, 




Ro&well S. Bartlett, 


36 


Bridgeport, 


Sept. 1, 1870. 


Connecticut, " 




Willis J. Bailey, 


23 


New Haven, Oct. 20, 1876, 


New York, " 




Joseph Warren, 


19 


Hartford, Dec. ^0, 1876, 


Connecticut, " 




Edgar Freeman, 


24 


New Haven, 


Jan. 17, 1879, 


Connecticut, " 




Charles Worden, 


22- 


Bridgeport, 


Feb. 9, 1879, 


New York, " 





PRISONERS PARDONED BY GENERAL ASSEMBLY, JANUARY SESSION, 1881. 



NAMES. 


NATIVITY. 


CRIME. 


Joseph H. Clark, 
William Harrington, 
Charles J. Allen, 
John R. Johnson, 
Harvey Chamberlin, 


Louisiana, 

Ireland, 

Connecticut, 

Sweeden, 

Connecticut, 


Murder 2d degree. 
Stealing from person. 
Murder 2d degree. 

it ii 

it it 



Prisoners pardoned by the Secretary of the Navy, 



1882. 



OF THE CONNECTICUT STATE I'KISON. 



21 



RATIONS. 

Sunday, Breakfast, Rice and molasses, bread and cofl 

Dinner, Beef and vegetable soup, and bread. 

Supper, Bread. 

Monday, Breakfast, Corned beef hash, bread and coffee. 

Dinner, Corned beef, vegetables and bread. 

Supper, Mush and molasses. 

Tuesday, Breakfast, Codfish hash, bread and coffee. 

Dinner, Stewed beans and pork, and bread. 

Supper, Hominy and milk. 

Wednesday, Breakfast, Rice and beef hash, bread and coffee. 

Dinner, Fresh beef stew and bread. 

Supper, Biead and molasses. 

Thursday, Breakfast, Baked beans and pork, bread and coffee. 

Dinner. Corned beef, vegetables and bread. 

Sapper, Mush and molasses. 

Friday, Breakfast, Oatmeal and molasses, bread and coffee. 

Dinner, Codtish hash and bread. 

Supper, Bread and tea. 

Saturday, Breakfast, Corned beef hash, bread and coffee. 

Dinner, Stewed peas and pork and bread. 

Supper, Mush and milk. 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT. 



To the Directors of Connecticut State Prison : 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit to you my annual report. 

Religious Services. 

In these there has been no material change. The 
mbling of the men in the hall at the close of each 
day's labor for singing and prayer, has been continued 
with the utmost regularity throughout the year. Prayer 
at evening has also been offered in the female department. 
The regular chapel services have been maintained on each 
Lord'- day, with unabated interest, and we trust, have 
had a healthful and beneficial influence upon all in 
attendance. 

The Sunday-school is in a very prosperous condition. 
The number in attendance has been larger than during 
any previous ye:ir of its history, and the attention paid to 
the Lessons, gives evidence of a constantly increasing 
interest in the study of the word of Gtod. The Young 
Men's Christian Association, have continued to furnish 
thf school with a zealous and able corps of teacl 
This department of our work has received a new impetus 

through the introduction of the "Sunday School 

Quarterly/' issued by the Sunday School Union, and we 
are v.-ry hopeful in regard to its ultimate results. Several 

who are unable to read, have been formed into clas 

and are receiving instructions in the rudiments of the 
English language. 



30 report of the directors [January, 



Afternoon Services. 



These services, under the management of Director H. 
T. Sperry, have been continued. Great credit is due Mr. 
Sperry for the deep interest he has manifested in the wel- 
fare of these unfortunate men. Through his self-sacri- 
ficing efforts many valuable and instructive lectures 
have been given and musical entertainments furnished. 
It is but just to say that Mr. Sperry has endeared himself 
to all, as the prisoners' friend. The singing services have 
been under the leadership of Mr. E. Lloyd of Hartford. 

Reading Matter. 

The cells are supplied with Bibles and Prayer books, 
also, with educational books when desired. The library 
books are changed twice each week, thus giving to all, 
the opportunity of entertainment and improvement. 
Nearly one half of the books on our shelves at the com- 
mencement of the year, have been discarded on account 
of their mutilated condition, thus reducing the number of 
volumes, while a considerable number of new and valu- 
able books have been added. We hope, in the course of 
time to see our shelves filled with books that will be an 
honor to the State. We continue to receive Scribner's, 
Harper's and Lippincot's Magazines, also several Illus- 
trated Papers. Some unbound volumes have been 
donated by J. D. Bates, Esq., of Hartford, and will soon 
be bound and ready for circulation. 

Educational. 

Those who can read and write, . . . 199 
Those who can read only, .... 27 

Those who can neither read nor write, . . 11 

237 



Habits. 

Temperate, 45 

Intemperate, 192 



237 



OF THE CONNECTICUT STATE PR] 31 



Have been in Reform School, .... 34 
Never been in Reform School, 



Number under 20 years of age, . . . 24 

Number over 20, and under 36, . . . 147 

Number over 36 years of age, .... 66 



23'! 



237 



In Conclusion. 

The various agencies employed for the improvement 
and reformation'of the prisoners, have had a most salutary 
and beneficial effect in some instances to say the least. 
Some liav.- given good evidence of a great change in heart 

and life, and are striving to demonstrate the fact, not only 
by their strict conformity to the rules and regulations of 
the institution, but also by their daily religious devotions, 
and their deep interest in the study of God's word. 
Others, who have been discharged, having completed their 
term of service 1 , are now engaged in honorable employ- 
ment, and carrying out in their daily lives those principles 
which have her implanted in their hearts. But 

many leave these walls to return to their old ways of sin 
and crime and continue to disappoint the hopes of their 
friends. On the whole, I am greatly encouraged and 
hopeful iti my work, and believe that labor for the Master 
in the Connecticut State Prison, is not in vain, nor 
strength spent for naught. 

My relations with the officers have been of the pleas- 
ant. *st character. All have rendered me all the aid in 
their power toward the furtherance of my work, for 
which they have my sincere thanks, as do you also 
gentleman, for the interest you have manifested in the 
comfort and welfare of myself and family. 

Respectfully yours, 

A. HOWARD, Chaplain. 
WKTHEESFrELD, November 30, 1881. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Directors of the Connecticut State Prison: 

Gentlemen : 

Malarial fever lias been for the last year almost the 
only prevailing disease in the Prison. A slight exception 
is found in an epidemic of bowel trouble in July and 
August, often assuming a mild dysenteric form. No 
serious results followed. (It may be properly said here 
this epidemic was somewhat widely spread, some eases 
of much severity occuring in this and other towns). 

For the most part cases of malaria! fever have been 
readily controlled, although a recurrence of the attack 
has been too frequent, owing to the difficulty, in many 
instances, of continuing proper remedies after the patient 
had fell himself comfortably relieved. Occurring as it 
lias for the mosl part among men ordinarily in good 
health, some Little inconvenience has been felt, and in the 
Lere has been a considerable loss of time. In 
a few instances convalescence has been protracted, and in 
Borne instances the dis.-as.* has culminated* in some 
chronic affection, or perhaps wakened into activity some 
pre-existing constitutional vice. 

There have been about the usual number and variety 
chronic complaints, many of which were imported with 
the patient 

There were five deaths ; all, with perhaps one exception, 
from chronic diseae 

The following is a concise history of these cae 
Michael McPartland, — who-.- case was noticed in my last 
report, as one in which there was Little hop.' of impro 
m. -in. -died January 16th, from chronic dia tic 

5 



34 report of the directors [January, 

brain, probably syphilitic in its origin He had been in 
Prison about three years, and had been more or less 
insane during this time. 

William Libby, a life prisoner, died April 30th. He 
had been in confinement a little more than six years. The 
commencement of his attack, in January, 1880, was a 
chronic pneumonia, apparently of malarial origin, but the 
disease soon became one principally of the bowels and 
tuberculous in its type. 

Daniel Wrinn died May 13th, of pneumonic consump- 
tion. The case was one in which the pulmonary compli- 
cation, seemed only a local manifestation of a constitu- 
tional malady. Attention was called to him a little more 
than a month before his death. He was in fair flesh, 
very pale, suffering from gastric derangement, and for a 
short time previous had shown signs of mental derange- 
ment. Although urgent symptoms were mitigated, he 
declined with great rapidity, his disease soon becoming 
one principally of the lungs. He had been in Prison only 
about two and one -half years. 

James Lattin died May 14th, also of consumption, but 
of the more common form of the disease. From his own 
statement, he appears to have belonged to a consumptive 
family. His illness began in a cold, or influenza, some 
four months before his death. 

Joseph Crawford, died June 27th, of caries of the spine. 
He came into Prison October 21, 1880, at which time his 
disease, — which appears to have been caused by an injury 
to his back sometime previous — had made considerable 
progress. He was at once sent to the hospital, where he 
remained till his death. His sufferings were exception- 
ally severe during the last weeks of his life, and were only 
made tolerable by overpowering opiates and anodynes. 

Recent cases of pulmonary disease of a consumptive 
tendency, have been of less frequent occurrence than in 
many years, some old ones, are (so to speak) left over, 
and are in a very satisfactory condition, (to themselves, 
as well as those who have had the care of them.) 

Four of them will soon be discharged on expiration of 



-'}.] OF THE CONM-:< TI( IT STATE PRISON. 86 

their sentences, in trery comfortable health. One of them 
is in for more rigorous health, than al the time of his 
committment. 

[a the continued prevalence of malaria] disease in til*' 
Prison, at all chargeable to any fault in its sanitary condi- 
tion 1 This is a pertinent question, and one likely to be 
ask. hi by those having its welfare in charge. 

To assert no fault exists would be a very foolish pre- 
sumption, but a fairly satisfactory answer may be found, 
in the continued prevalence of the disease in so many 
places in the States, apparently surrounded by the best 
hygienic influences ; and also in the fact of so great an 
immunity from that class o! diseases, which art 1 most 
looked for in institutions where Large numbers are gath- 
ered. No case of typhoidal disease has occurred, nor, 
(with the exception of malarial fever, and the slight epi- 
demic before mentioned), has there been an occurrence of 
any disease worth notice, classed as zymotic. 

A. S. WARNER. 
Wethehsfield, November 30, 1881. 






». 



ABSTKAUT 



Returns Concerning Jails, 



AND OF THE 



ACCOUNTS OF THE COUNTY TREASURERS, 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1881. 



Compiled by the Secretary of State. 



HARTFORD : 

PRESS OF WILEY. WATERMAN A: EATON. 

1882. 



i 



jfrtatc of tfonnrrticut. 



Office of Secretary of State. 
To the Honorable General Assembly : 

In compliance with the provisions of law, the Secretary of State has 
prepared, and herewith transmits, an Abstract of Returns concerning 
Jails, and of the accounts of the County Treasurers, for the year ending 
November 30th, 1881. 

The whole number of persons committed during the year is 4,332. 
The number confined in all the Jails, November 30th, was 507. 

In an appendix is given the amounts received for licenses fur the sale 
of intoxicating drinks in each of the counties of the State. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES E. SEARLS, 

Secretary of State. 



ABSTRACT OF RETURNS. 



*. 



6 



Returns concerning JAILS for the county of HARTFORD, for the 
year ending November 30£/i, 1881. 

[Certified by L. G. Goodrich, T. 



Number in Jail November 30th, 1880, 
Committed during the year, .... 
Discharged " « " , 

Number remaining in Jail, November 30th, 1881. 



H. Spencer and Westell Russell, County Com- 
missioners.] 



127 

903—1,030 
886 



144 



White Males, 
Colored Males, 



COLOR AND SEX. 

712 Females, 133 

50 Females, 8 



Over 21 years, Males, 646 
Under 21 years, Males, 116 



AGE 

Females, 
Females, 



132 

9 



Total, 
Total, 



Total, 

Total, 



845 
58—903 



778 
125- 



NATIVITY, &C. 

Natives of this State, ...... 

" other States, ..... 

" other countries, ..... 

Who have been married, ..... 

Natives of this State who cannot read or write, 

" other States who cannot read or write, . 

" other countries who cannot read or write, 

Who have been strictly temperate, 
" " moderate drinkers, 

" st habitually intemperate, 

" "in prison before, .... 

COMMITTED. 

On Civil Process, . . 6 

For Manslaughter, . . 1 

Assault with intent to kill, 4 



■903 



315 
200 
388 
411 

39 

28 
110 

13 
818 

72 
539 



Setting Fires, 


2 


Stealing from the person, 
Larceny, . 
Horse stealing, . 


7 

123 

5 


Burglary, . 
Assault, 


39 
123 


Breach of Peace, 


97 


Malicious Injury, 


14 


Obtaining goods on false 




pretense, 
Making or passing coun- 
terfeit money, 


13 

2 


Attempt at rape, 

Rape, 

Neglect of family, 


4 

1 

11 



For evading fare, . . 5 
Driving horse without leave, 1 

Making threats, . . 1 
Defrauding boarding-house 

keeper, ... 9 

Cruelty to animals, . 3 

Perjury, ... 2 

Adultery, ... 3 

Violation of city ordinance, 2 

Illegal voting, . . 3 

Indecent exposure, . 3 

Fornication, . . 3 

Bastardy, ... 4 

Lewd conduct, . . 2 

As common prostitute, . 8 

For Keeping house of ill-fame, 4 

Frequenting " 1 
Vagrancy, . . 46 



COMMITTED — CON I INUI I' 



Poi Drunkenness, . 292 For Tramps, 

>mmon drunkards, . 10 

For violation of lnpior l;i\v, 7 Total, 

Resisting officer, 



903 



DISCHARGED. 



By Writ of habeas corpus, 
Bail or recognizam 
Payment ol fine and costs, 
Expiration of sentence, 
State Attorney, . 
County ( commissioners, 

Average number in confinement during the year, 



•J 

29 
287 
L26 

13 

26 



Sent to Court and not r. turned, 
11 State Prison, 

I osane I [ospitsJ, . 
Died 

Total, . 



19 

:; 

:; 



886 



RKCEIPTS. 

Received from the State for hoard of prisoners, 
From the Unite S .... 

From the City 

From the Earnii ga of prisoners, 
Du^ from Labor of prisoners, 
Received from jail, .... 

Received from sale of produce. . . • 

Due from United States for board of prisoners, 
s for tx >ard ot prisoners, 
,k * City ol Hartford for board of prisoners, 
Due for barrels and bones, .... 

Total amount received and due, . 



$15,684.50 
361.39 

112.4 9 

1,300.00 

350.00 

5543 
101.95 

4,802.28 

7.92 
$22,875.90 



EXPENDITURES. 



For Provisions, 
Clothing, 
Bedding, 
Fuel, . 
Lightf 

Medicines, 

Medical atten Ian 

Water and 1 
5 lary of Jailor, 
S 
Chaplain, 

•;d impro 
Ban ei 
Furniture, 

All other 

Total expendil 



$6,92 1.7 7 
508.41 
2:i7.2:. 
1,61 
181.89 
235.72 
150.00 
328 

100.00 
1,11 
2€ 
108.92 

2 

131.14 



8 



Returns concerning JAILS for the county of NE W HA VEN 1 for the 
year ending November 30th, 188 L 

[Certified by Lewis B. Perkins, Hiram Jacobs and Marcus E. Baldwin, County 

Commissioners.] 



Number in Jail, November 30th, 1880, 
Committed during the year, .... 
Discharged during the year, .... 

Number remaining in Jail, November 30th, 1881, 



165 
1,832—1,997 



1,822 



175 





COLOR AND SEX. 








White Males, 1537 Females 


,234 Total 


, 1771 




Colored Males, 48 Females 


, 13 Total 


61—1832 




AGE. 








Over 2 1 years, Males, 1342 Females 


, 228 Total 


, 1570 




Under 21 years, Males, 242 Females 


, 20 Total 


t 262—1832 




NATIVITY, &c. 






Natives of this State, .... 




713 




" other States, 


. 




328 




" other countries, 






791 




Who have been married, 






729 




Natives of this State who cannot read or write, 




58 




" other States who cannot read 


or write. . 




40 




" other countries who cannot read or write. 




226 




Who have been strictly temperate, 






93 




" " moderate drinkers, 


. 




932 




M " habitually intemperate, 


. 




807 




" " in prison before, . 


• 




1229 




COMMITTED 








On Civil Process, . . 13 For 


Tramps under 


tramp law, 6 




As Insane, ... 3 


Embezzlement, 


3 




For Manslaughter, . . 3 


Obtaining gooc 


s on false 




Assault with intent to kill, 5 


pretense, 


9 


w 


Murder, ... 7 


Forgery, . 


I 


Stealing from the person, 10 


Rape, 


4 


Robbery and theft, . 113 


Attempt at rap 


e, . 1 




Horse stealing, . . 6 


Theft, third off 


3nse, . 5 


m 


Burglary, . . . 13 


Adultery, . 


4 


. 


Statutory Burglary,. 13 


Fornication, 


. . 12 


\ 


Defrauding, . . 1 


Injury to privat 


e property, 14 




Defrauding boarding house 


Taking horse w 


ithout per- 


.* 


keeper, . . 13 


mission of o\ 


vner, . 10 




Defrauding R. R. Co., 6 


Bail piece, 


12 


^ . 


Assault and battery, . 65 


Lewd conduct, 


47 


IL\ 


Breach of Peace, . 182 


Street walking, 




2 



com Ml i TED- OON PINl ED. 



Seduction, 
Bigamy, . 

lomy, . 
Bleeping house of ill-fame 
Frequenting house iA' ill- 

fame, 
Vagrancy, 



4 

•J 7 



For Drunkenness, . . 1051 

A I '. .Minion drunkards, . 19 

Resisting offio r, 

All other offenses, . . 68 

Total, . . . 1832 



DISCHARGED. 



By Writ of habeas corpus. 1 

Rail or recognizance, . 85 

Payment o( fine and costs, 543 

Expiration of sentence, 880 

State attorney, . 35 

County Commissioners, 62 



Sent to State Prison, . . 21 

Escaped and not retaken, . ■'! 

By process not specified above, 105 

Died 1 



Total, 



Sent to court and not returned, 86 

Average number in confinement during the year, 



1822 



RECEIPTS. 

Received from the State for board of prisoners, 
From the United States, 
From Karnings of prisoners, . 
From civil process prisoners, . 

Articles sold at Jail, food, &c, 

Due for board of United States prisoners, 

Total amount received and due, 



$20,411.88 

150 32 

2,8:;::.:;:; 

12.52 

684.00 

31.80 

$24,12 



EXPENDITURES. 



For Provisions, 

Clothing, 
Bedding, 
Fuel, . 
Repairs and fixtures, 

. 
Water, . 
Medicines, 
Medical attendance, 
Salary of .Jailor, 

,:\ of A —i-'allts, 

Chaplain, 

:.ry Commissioners, 

Printing and advertising, 

All otle-r • 

Total Bxpenditures, 

2 



$8,775.27 
292.35 
151.93 

1,581.00 
1,438 28 

•_".»3.69 

•_'oo. oo 

32; 

180.25 

1,65 

2,4 10.21 

125.00 

450.00 

57.20 

$18,21 



i 



10 

Returns concerning JAILS for the county of NEW LONDON, for the 
year ending November 30th, 1881, 

[Certified by David R. Stevens, Paul B. Greene and Erastus Geer, County Com- 
missioners.] 

Number in Jail, November 30th, 1880, . . '. 55 

Committed during the year, ..... 421 — 476 

Discharged during the year, ..... 420 

Number remaining in Jail, November 30th, 1881, . 56 



White Males, 
Colored Males, 



COLOR AND SEX. 

335 Females, 50 

24 Females, 12 



Total, 385 
Total, 36—421 



Over 21 years, Males, 320 
Under 21 years, Males, 39 



AGE. 

Females, 
Females, 



56 
6 



Total, 
Total, 



376 
45- 



-421 



NATIVITY, &C. 

Natives of this State, ..... 

" other States, .... 

" other countries, .... 

Who have been married, .... 

Natives of this State who cannot read or write, 

" other States who cannot read or write 

other countries who cannot read or write 
Who have been strictly temperate, 
" moderate drinkers, 
" " habitually intemperate, 

" "in prison before, . 



163 

113 

145 

139 

14 

11 

45 

9 

332 

80 

217 



COMMITTED. 



On Civil process, . . 6 

As Insane, ... 2 

For Manslaughter, . . 1 

Assault with intent to kill, 3 

Setting fires, . . 3 

Stealing from the person, 4 

Larceny, ... 8 

Horse stealing, . . 2 

Burglary, ... 8 

House breaking, . 4 
Obtaining goods on false 

pretense, . . 6 

Forgery, ... 1 

Perjury, ... 1 

Adultery, . . 1 

Fornication, . . 2 



For Bastardy, . . 1 

Rape, ... 1 

Attempt at rape, . 2 

Lewd conduct, . . 1 

As Common prostitute, . 4 

For Keeping house of ill-fame, 7 
Frequenting house of ill- 
fame, ... 9 
Vagrancy, . . 11 
Drunkenness, . . 182 

As Common drunkards, . 9 

Violation of liquor law, 9 

Resisting officer, . 2 

All other offenses, . . 131 



Total, 



421 



11 



DISCHARGED. 



By Writ of Habeas Corpus, 
Bail or recognisanoi 
Payment ol fine and costs. 
Expiration of sentence, 
State Attorney, . 
County Commissio] 

Transferred to other Jails for 
trial. 



2 Sent to court and not returned. 8 



in 
98 

1 i 
17 

13 



Scut to State Prison, 
Sent to Reform School, 

Process ii..! specified above, 

Total . 



Average number in confinement during the year, 



420 



47 



KKCEIPTS. 



Received from the State for board of prisoners, 
From Earnings of prisoners, . 
Due from Labor of prisoners, 

. 
From sale of cow, hogs and manure, 
Doe from State for board of prisoners, 
11 State for key fees, . 

Total amount received and due, 



$5,673.38 



i it.:;:', 


72.10 


202 00 


106 25 


431.40 


6 00 



$6,938.46 



EXPENDITURES. 



For Provisions, 

Clothing, 

Bedding, 

Fuel, . 

Lights, . 

Medicines, 

Medical attendance, 
lary of Jailors. . 

Salary OJ nts, 

All other expenses, 

Total expenditures, 



$3,635.93 


179 L3 






29 61 


98.28 


6600 


1.250.00 


513.23 


1,87 



- 






I 



12 



Returns concerning JAILS for the county of FAIRFIELD, for the 
year ending November 30 th, 1881. 

[Certified by C. B. Wheeler, John O. Page and Nathan M. Belden, County Com- 
missioners.] 

Number in Jail, November 30th, 1880, ... 100 

Committed during the year, . . . . 788 — 888 

Discharged during the year, ..... 823 

Number remaining in Jail, November 30th, 1881, . 65 



White Males, 
Colored Males, 



COLOR AND SEX. 

700 Females, 



Females, 



53 




Total, 
Total, 



753 
35- 



788 



Over 21 years, Males, 588 
Under 21 years, Males, 146 



AGE. 

Females, 
Females. 



38 
16 



Total, 
Total, 



626 

162—788 



NATIVITY, &C. 

Natives of this State, ..... 
" other States, .... 

" other countries, .... 

Who have been married, .... 
Natives of this State who cannot read or write, 
" other States who cannot read or write 

" other countries who cannot read or write 

Who have been strictly temperate, 
" " moderate drinkers, 

" " habitually intemperate, 

" " in prison before, . 



225 

202 

361 

296 

9 

14 

61 

41 

264 

483 

441 



COMMITTED. 



On Civil Process, . . 1 

For Murder, ... 8 

Assault with intent to kill, 6 

Setting fires, . . 1 

Robbery, ... 4 

Stealing from the person, 3 

Larceny, ... 86 

Horse stealing, . . 17 

Burglary, . . . 30 
Obtaining goods on false 

pretense, . . 9 
Making or passing coun- 
terfeit money, . 2 
Forgery, ... 2 
Rape, ... 1 
Attempt at rape, . 2 



For Adultery, . . 4 

Fornication, . . 6 

Bastardy, ... 1 

Abortion, ... 2 

Lewd conduct, . . 4 

As common prostitute, . 2 

Vagrancy, . . 36 

Drunkenness, . . 460 

As Common drunkards, . 7 

For Violation of liquor law, 2 

Resisting officer, . 51 

Contempt of court, . 1 

All other offenses, . . 40 

Total, . . .788 



13 



DlSCHAKiiKIV 



By Bail <>r recognisance, 
Payment <>t fine ami i 

County Com:: 



13 
129 

20 

7 1 



31 

ped ;tii(i cot retaken, . 5 

By procen not specified aboTe, i'» 



Total, 



Sent to court and not returned, 15 

Average number in confinement during the year, 






80 



RECEIPTS. 










Received from State for board of prisoners, . . . 110,541.51 


11 Key • 








11 Taxes and interest, . 








193 40 


5 per cent, on licenses, 








2,128.89 


from sale of horse 








150.00 


Error in order (387), 








21.95 


Balance in treasury, November 30, 1880, 






3,124.66 


$18,492.91 


EXPENDITURES. 


For Provisions, Bridgeport Jail, . . $2,69 


" Danbury Jail, 










1,026.11 


Clothing, Bridgeport Jail, 










351.48 


" Danbury Jail, . 












Bedding, 










144.57 


Fuel, .... 










933.00 


Light 










1 S 8 2 8 


lie Koines, 










107.60 


Medical attendance, 










75 00 


~ 










•-',099.97 


- 










1. "49.94 


County Commissioners, 










1.1' 


All other expenses, 










7.1 • 


Total expenditure?, 










$17,001.40 



I 



16 



Returns concerning JAILS for the county of LITCHFIELD, for the 
year ending November 30th, 1881. 

[Certified by Joseph F. Calhoun, George Pierpont and Lyman Dunning, County 

Commissioners.! 



Number in Jail, November 30th, 1880, 
Committed during the year, .... 
Discharged during the year, .... 

Number remaining in Jail, November 30th, 1881, 



19 
106—125 
95 

30 



COLOR AND SEX. 



White Males, 
Colored Males, 



93 Females, 5 Total, 98 

6 Females, 2 Total, 8—106 



AGE. 



Over 21 years, Males, 86 
Under 21 years, Males, 13 



Females, 
Females, 



Total, 
Total, 



89 
17—106 



NATIVITY, &C. 

Natives of this State, . 
" other States, 

" other countries, . 

Who have been married, 

Natives of this State who cannot read or write, 
" other States who cannot read or write, 

" other countries who cannot read or write, 

Who have been strictly temperate, 
" " moderate drinkers, 

" " habitually intemperate, . 

" "in prison before, . 



50 
37 
19 
52 
13 
13 
5 
25 
55 
26 
32 



COMMITTED. 




On Civil Process, 


4 


For Attempt at Rape, 


1 


For Assault with intent to kill, 


1 


Common prostitute, 


1 


Setting fires, 


2 


Frequenting house of ill- 




Stealing from the person, 


2 


fame, 


1 


Horse stealing, . 


5 


Vagrancy, 


2 


Burglary, . 


7 


Drunkenness, 


20 


Obtaining goods on false 




As Common Drunkards, . 


3 


pretense, 


3 


For Violation of liquor law, 


2 


Perjury, . 


I 


All other offenses, 


47 


Adultery, 


3 






Rape, 


1 


Total, . 


106 



17 



DISCU . 



By Bail or recognizance, . 

Payment of one unci o< 

Expiration of sentence, 

State •;.-. . 

County ( '< unmisai men, 
Sent to Courl and qoI returned, 



3 
29 
18 

9 

■» 



Sent to St bool, 3 

-• State Prison, 

By pz '_' l 

!, . . 95 



Average Dumber in confinement during the 



•) IB 
-Iff 





RECEIPTS. 










red from til** State for hoard of prisoners, . $2.91 J 21 


Key .... 




. 


Earnings of prisoners, 








. 


Due for pr ard, 








393.12 


Labor oi prisoners, 








196.35 


fed 5 per cent, on licenses, 








495 B2 


Due for rents, .... 










Pork sold, 








93 08 


Taxes due from town of Sharon, 








322.71 


Total amount received and due, 






. $5,057 37 


EXPENDITURES. 


For Provisions, . . . . . . $2,0 


Cloth .... 








20 


ling, 










18 23 


Fuel, . 










352 


L _ . 












M< 












Medical attendance, 












try of Jailor, 










, 1 00 


. 












County ( lommissionerB, . 










- . in) 


All other e 












Total expenditure 












3 













I 



■i 



18 

Returns concerning JAILS for the county of MIDDLESEX, for the 
year ending November 30th, 188 1. 

[Certified by Willis E. Terrill, R. C. Shepard and Miner C. Hazen, County 

Commissioners.] 



Number in Jail, November 30th, 1880, 
Committed during the year, .... 
Discharged during the year, . 

Number remaining in Jail, November 30th, 1881, 



22 
157- 



179 
161 

18 



White Males, 
Colored Males,' 



COLOR AND SEX. 



146 

3 



Females, 8 
Females, 



Total, 

Total, 



154 
3- 



157 



Over 2i years, Males, 140 
Under 21 years, Males, 9 



AGE. 

Females, 
Females. 



Total, 
Total, 



M7 

10- 



157 



NATIVITY, &C. 

Natives of this State, ..... 
" other States, .... 

" other countries, .... 

Who have been married, .... 
Natives of this State who cannot read or write, 
" other States who cannot read or write 

" other countries who cannot read or write 

Who have been strictly temperate, •. 

" " moderate drinkers, 

" " habitually intemperate, 

" " in prison before, . 



50 

26 

81 

51 

5 

7 

30 

16 

40 

101 





COMMITTED. 




For Murder, . 


1 


For Fornication, 


2 


Assault, . . . 30 
Assault with intent to kill, 4 
Stealing from the person, 1 
Larceny, . . . 18 
Burglary, ... 9 
Breach of Peace, . 4 
House breaking, . 2 


Vagrancy, 
Drunkenness, 
As Common Drunkard, 
All other offenses, 

Total, . 


6 

78 
i 

1 
157 




DISCHARGED. 





By Bail or recognizance, . 3 

Payment of fine and costs, 1 7 
Expiration of sentence, 108 
State Attorney, . . 2 

Sent to court and not returned, 2 



Sent to State Reform School, 9 
Escaped and not retaken, . 1 

By process not specified abovre, 19 



Total, 



Average number in confinement during the year, 



161 



19* 



I 



19 



KKCK1PTS. 




red from the State for board of prisoners, 


. | 1 


Ted or due for board of prisoners, 


101.84 


" from earnings of prisoners, 


. 


•• from labor of prisonei 3,. 


. 


Value of crops, etc, raised on farm. 


1,1 : 


For provisions, ...... 


. 


Brick and oil, ..... 


. 





11.00 


Beifer, ....... 


22. 50 


E ctra board o( prison. 


51.70 


! amount received and due, . 


. $4,871.87 


EXPENDITUBK8. 




For Repairs at M iddletown jail, . . . . 


$44.50 


Baddam, " . 


. 


'• court house, 


7.24 


Middletown 


. 


Provisions, Baddam, .... 


2,03 


" Middletown, 


. 


ling Baddam, .... 


2 i ; 


iing, "..... 


. 


Fuel, u 


. 


11 Middletown, ..... 


. 


: its and soap, Baddam, . . . . 


17.":: 


Medical attendance, . 


41.18 


Me licinea and attendance, Middletown 


. 


Salary of .Jailor, Middletown, . . . . 


200.00 


" Baddam, including 4 months of 


1880, 


11 M assistants, Haddam, 


. 


'lain, ....... 


. 


County ' mere, . 


. 


. 


. 


1 [ousehold implements, . 


. 


>ry and printing, . . . . . 


. 





. 


;rer, . 


1" 


K tchen help, ...... 


ISI 


Lees, ...... 


. 


ght l)ills, 


. 


. 


. 


of prisoners, . 


17" 


. 


. 


\\'.»rK on COO . 


. 


. 




of Clerk '-e, . 


U0 


Kin vault for 1 turn 









Nen i lam, . . . . . 


. 


All other 


. 


Total expenditures, . . . . . 


. > 



20 

Returns concerning JAILS for the county of TOLLAND, for the year 
ending November 30 th, 1881. 



[Certified by Edwin D. Alvord, J. R. Champlin and D. W. Huntington, County 

Commissioners.] 



Number in Jail, November 30th, 1880, 
Committed during the year, . 

Discharged during the year, 

Number remaining in Jail, November 30th, 1881, 



44 — 51 
49 



COLOR AND SEX. 



White Males, 


40 


Females, 


3 


Total, 


43 


Colored Males, 


1 


Females, 





Total, 


1 



-44 



AGE. 



Over 21 years, Males, 35 Females, 2 Total, 37 

Under 21 years, Males, 7 Females. Total, 7 — 44 



nativity, &c. 



Natives of this State, and other States, . 

" other countries, .... 

Who have been married, .... 
Natives of this State who cannot read or write, 
" other States who cannot read or write, 

" other countries who cannot read or write 

Who have been strictly temperate, 
" " moderate drinkers, 

" " habitually intemperate, 



14 


30 


21 


no return. 


<< 


5 


1 


no return. 



For Assault, . 


./UJVLIVI 

16 


11 LEjU. 

For 


Larceny, . 


12 


Alio 


Obtaining goods on false 






pretense, 


1 




Drunkenness, 


10 





For Violation of liquor law, 



Total. 



1 

4 

44 



21 



nisi mi a union. 



Bj Bail or recognisance, . 1 Sent to State prison, . :; 

Paymenl of fine and costs, 7 Bscaped and not retakenj . l 

ration of Bentence, l •; — 

• Attorney, . . It Total, ... 49 

County Commissioners, 7 



A.verage nnmbez in confinement during the vcar, 



RECEIPTS. 

Received from State for board of prisoners, . . . $1,140.73 

11 Key fees, ■ 23 50 

Total amount received and due, .... $1,163.23 



EXPENDITURES. 



For Salary of Jailor, $1,164.23 



i 
i 

i 



22 



COLOR, AGE, SEX, NATIVITY, HABITS. 





T3 

§ 

ffl 


> 

o3 

► 


a 
o 

a 

o 

Hi 


2 
© 

"3 


i 

o3 

a 


'a? 
o 

3 


M 
<a 

in 

a 

9 


o 
H 


"3 

o 

H 




712 
133 


1,537 
234 


335 
50 


700 
53 


74 
5 


93 
5 


146 

8 


40 
3 




White Females, 




Total 


845 

50 

8 


1,771 

48 
13 


385 

24 
12 


753 
35 


79 

2 


98 

6 
2 


154 
3 


43 
1 


4,128 


























Total 


58 

646 
132 


61 

1,342 

228 


36 

320 
56 


35 

588 
38 


2 

65 
5 


8 

86 
3 


3 

140 

7 


1 

35 

2 


204 


















Total 


778 

116 
9 


1,570 

242 

20 


376 

39 
6 


626 

146 

16 


70 

11 


89 

13 
4 


147 

9 
1 


37 

7 


3,693 






Minors, Males, 








Total, 


125 

315 

200 

388 


262 

713 
328 
791 


45 

163 
113 
145 


162 

225 

202 
361 


11 

30 
22 
29 


17 

50 

37 
19 


10 

50 

26 
81 


7 

* 
30 


639 






Natives of this State, 

Natives of other States, 

Natives of other countries,. 




Total, 


903 

13 

818 

72 


1,832 

93 
932 

807 


421 

9 
332 

80 


788 

41 

264 

483 


81 

2 

76 

3 


106 

25 
55 
26 


157 

16 

40 

101 


44 

1 
* 


4,332 










Moderate drinkers, 

Habitually intemperate, . . . 




Total 


903 


1,832 


421 


788 


81 


106 


157 


44 


4,332 











* Not returned. 



23 



OFFENSES. 



job « hat ormu ooMm rid. 


■6 
o 

fa 

■ 

3d 


d 

a 
- 

0> 


a 

z 

-: 
a 
5 
- 


B 


B 

1 
— 


u 

3 


8 
~Z 

3 


-3 


H 


i 


Abortion, .... 








4 






a 


Adultery, 


L98 


4 


i 


1 








i»; 




189 




66 
5 

1 

"., 

182 
28 
18 
19 










30 

l 






1 
i 

4 

6 

40 


2 

1 


6 

J 


i 


i 
i 






in 


Bastardy, 


8 


Bigamy,. ... .... 


■ < 


Breach of t he peart.', 


"*8 

H 

9 

4 


"so 

1 
7 
2 

1 


2 


"7 

1 
3 

1 


i 

.... 






Burglary, 


124 


Ciyll process 


:;o 


Common drunkards, 

Common prostitute, 


111 
Iff 








1 




3 


















1 

18 
6 

1051 
3 














1 


Defrauding boarding house keeper, . . 

Defrauding railroad company, 

Drunkenness 


9 




























n 


182 


460 


82 


20 


78 


10 


2115 

:; 


Evading fares 
















B 


rj 


1 
1 2 
4 
6 


1 
•j 

9 

2 
4 


1 
6 

'l7 










:; 


Foniical ion, 


8 

l 
5 


2 


.... 
5 


2 
*2 






frequenting house of ill-fame 


15 


Horse stealing 




House breaking, 


(I 




:; 










;; 


Dlegal voting, 
















:; 


Injury to property, .... 


n 

:; 

6 

47 














1 | 


Insane, 




2 

7 
8 
1 












n 


Bleeping house of ill-fame, 


4 
123 

•j 
•j 

14 

1 












17 


Larceny 

Lewd conduct, 


4 
2 






18 


12 


247 

54 


Making or passing counterfeit money,.. 

Malicious injury, .... 

Manslaughter 










1 














14 


:; 
-, 


1 














Murder 


a 






1 




In 


1 of family 


11 
LS 
2 

1 


11 


Obtaining goods on false pretense 

Perjury, 


'.I 

4 


6 

1 
1 
•j 


"i 

-»i 

i 


:::: 


3 

1 
1 




1 


41 

4 




1 


■ ing officer, 




Robhery, 










t 


: \ and theft, 




118 

2 

10 












llfl 




















Betting fires 


7 


4 


i 

3 





2 


'l 




- 


Bteallng from the person, 




Takii<L r borse withoul leave 


11 


Theft, third offense 
















Tramps 


1 

7 














m 


icy 

in of liquor law, 


11 

9 
481 


2 
M 

7ss 


4 

81 


2 
2 

n 

100 


"i 
157 


"l 




All ot 



















I 



24 

Abstract of the Treasurer's account for the county of HARTF ORD, 
for the year ending November 3Qth, 1881. 



[Certified by Lucius G. Goodrich, Thaddeus H. Speucer aud Westell Russell 
County Commissioners.] 



RECEIPTS, AND FROM WHAT SOURCES, VIZ. 



Balance from last year, ..... 


. $7,483.78 


From Board and labor of prisoners, 


. 13,384.11 


Labor, ...... 


1,300.00 


License transfers, .... 


38.00 


Interest on deposits, .... 


254.84 


Old Jail property rents, 


269.50 


5 per cent, of license receipts. 


2,902.00 


For produce from Jail, ..... 


101.95 


Taxation, ....... 


. 79,879.35 


Total receipts, .... 


. $105,613.53 



EXPENDITURES, AND FOR WHAT PURPOSES, VIZ. : 



For Superior Court, 








$4 26.94 


Common Pleas Court, 








1,200.00 


Supplies, &c, for Jail, 








15,833 91 


Rent, Commissioners' office, 








275.00 


Incidental, Commissioners' office, 








58.67 


Treasurer, .... 








350.00 


County Library, 








300.00 


Printing license blanks, . 








100.00 


Legal service, 








250.00 


Commissioners' fees, 








2,214.05 


Auditing County accounts, 








90.00 


Advertising, . . ' . 








9.00 


Insurance, .... 








30.00 


Safe, 








265.00 


Tax warrants, .... 








75.00 


County building site and expense of survey, 




53,218 75 


Balance in Treasury, .... 




30,916 96 


Total expenditures including ba 


lance, 






$105,613.53 



Balance remaining in the Treasury, 



$30,916.96 



25 

Ahetraet o <>t for the county of NEW 1 1 A VEN. 

A i '■ 30(A) 1881. 



[Certified t>\ Lewk B. Perkins, Birem Jaeobi and Marcos B. Baldwin, County 

mmlsaioners.] 



ITS, AND FHuM WHAT SOURCES, VIZ. 



From balance from last year's account. 
Five per cent, license money, 
Prison labor at jail, .... 

'•., sold at jail, 
Board of United States prisoner 
State of Connecticut for board of prison* 

rd of poor debtors, 
County Commissioners for transfer of licenses 
Sale of cow at jail, .... 
Cost in revocation cases, 

Total receipts, .... 



$1,524.20 
4,530.60 

2,8:;:; 33 

684.00 

150.32 

20,411.88 

12.52 

17:. 00 

55.00 

48.11 

$30,428.96 



EXPENDITURES, AND FOR WHAT PURPOSES, VIZ.: 



For Jail bills for the year, ..... 

Fuel for Jail. 

Repairs el Court House, .... 

lental expenses of Court House, 
License blanks. ...... 

Janitors of Court Hoi; .... 

Draping Col n the occa-ion of Garfield's death, 

rountj, ..... 

Printing, ....... 

>ners' fees, .... 

Auditor's bills, ...... 

idental expenses. County Commissioners' office, 
Tr- 
immest on Oonnl .... 

County debt, .... 

Costs of revocation ca .... 

Total expenditure .... 

Balance remaining in the Treasury, 

.ess of the County, ..... 

Reduction of debt, ...... 



$16,190 02 

1,581.00 

295.27 

85.73 

108.63 

:>.00 

58 85 

48.75 

J.J48 00 

45 <)i) 

71.88 

300.00 

881 

'0.00 

79 93 

$30,331.85 

197.11 

1 1. 1 

'0.00 



( 

I 



26 



Abstract of the Treasurer's account for the county of NEW LONDON, 
for the year ending November 30th, 1881. 



[Certified by David R. Stevens, Paul B. Greene and Erastus Geer, County Com- 
missioners.] 



RECEIPTS, AND FKOM WHAT SOURCES, VIZ. 



Jail account brought forward, 

In Treasury, December 1, 1880, 

Received from loans, 

Received from 5 per cent, license money, 

Total receipts, 



$6,938.46 
1,678 24 
1,000.00 
1,135.79 

$10,752.49 



EXPENDITURES, AND FOR WHAT PURPOSES, VIZ. 



Jail account brought forward, 
For Insurance, 

Auditing accounts, 

Key fees paid sheriff, 

County Commissioners, 

Court Houses, 

Interest, 

Printing, 

Revoking licenses, 

Treasurer, 

Note taken up, 

Total expenditures, 



$8,059.56 

83.00 

30.00 

115.50 

1,184.42 

208.48 

517.66 

78.00 

48.85 

150.00 

1,000.00 

$11,475.47 



Indebtedness of the County, 



$15,610.98 



27 

id of the Treasurer** account for the county of /•'. 1 IRFIELD 

the year ending Nobembet 30tA, 1 86 I . 



[Certified by Chas. B. Wheeler, John (). Pagt and Nathan If. Ihhhii, County 

Commissioners.] 



RECEIPTS, AND FROM WHAT SOURCES, VIZ. 



Balance in Treasury November 30, 1880, 


$3,1 1' J 66 


From Taxes, ....... 


2,193 40 


State for board of prisoners, .... 


10,54 ; 51 


Key fees, ....... 


32.50 


5 per cent, on license fees, from May 1, 1879, 


2,128 89 


Error in order No 387, .... 


2 1 95 


Borough of Danbury, sale of horses, 


150 00 


Total receipts, ..... 


$18,492.91 



EXPENDITURES, AND FOR WHAT PURPOSES, VIZ. 



For Expenses of Bridgeport court house, 








$433.42 


" Danbury 






96.08 


Rents, ...... 






1,858 00 


Postage, etc., .... 








17 17 


Provision account, Bridgeport jail, 








2,677.20 


11 u Danbury " 








1,026.11 


Clothing, Bridgeport jail, 








. 


Danbury 








7::. 77 


County Commissioners, . 








1,164.25 


" Treasurer, . 








17:; co 


Bridgeport jailor and assistants, 








2,449 94 


Danbury jailor, 








699 97 


Janitor Bridgeport court house, 








4:: 


" Danbury 








. 


Bridgeport jail, repairs and expe: 






. 


Danbury " u " 






153 30 


Water and Ice, . . . . . 






:;: 


Ex] >urt of Common F\< 






24 


Fairfield County bar library, 






60O.m) 


. Stationery and printing, . 










21S 


nit, 










120 29 


Medicines, 










Hi; 60 


■ tl attendance, 












1 iuiL r . Bridgeport jail, 










104.31 


11 Danbury " 












Fee: 










3<<: 



28 



Lights, , 


$158.28 


Blacksmithing and repairs, .... 


64 70 


Fuel, Bridgeport jail, ..... 


609.45 


Fuel, Danbury jail and court house, 


323.55 


Insurance, . . . . . . ■ 


507.50 


Auditors, ....... 


60.00 


Commissioners' court, : 


112.00 


Judicial expenses, ...... 


186.67 


Key fees, ....... 


332.50 


Miscellaneous bills, ..... 


386.19 


Total expenditures, 


$17,001.40 


uce remaining in the Treasury, . 


$1,491.51 






Abstract < '''"' county of WIXPIfAM 

tht year ' li'linij A 80(A) 1881. 



[Certified by Bdwla II. Ball, John D. Converse and Richard II. Ward, County 

iniuissionere.J 



RECEIPTS, AND FROM WHAT SOURCES, VIZ. 



Balance in Treasury November 30, 1880, 


$122.75 


From State for board of 


prisoners, 


1,52 


Earnings of prisoners for year, . 


1,050.91 


<< 


old account, 


48 '-'7 


Board not taxed, 


. 


106.86 


Beef sold, 


. 


132 00 


Calf - 




7.00 


Mud " 




5.00 


Bones, 90cts; milk, 


25 cts ; basket, 50 cts., . 


1.65 


Old iron, 


. 


L1.20 


Rent of basement, 


. 


24.00 


Revocation of license, costs of suits. 


56.09 


5 per cent, of license money, 


337 66 


Total receipts, 




$3 ; 432.22 



EXPENDITURES, AND FOR WHAT PURPOSES, VIZ. \ 



For Provisions, 

Clothing, 

Fuel, 

Lights, . 

Medicines, 

Medical sitter dance, 

Salary of Jailor, 

" assistants, 
" chaplain, 

County Commissioners, 

All other expense- 
Total expenditures 



$1,247.28 

57.31 

29.10 

8.56 

1.13 
7.00 

60v 

20 00 
362 
8 15 

$3,318.98 



Balance remaining in the Treasury, 



$113.24 



I 



30 

Abstract of the Treasurer's account for the county of LITCHFIELD, 
for the year ending November 30th, 1881. 



[Certified by Joseph F. Calhoun, George Pierpont and Lyman Dunning, County 

Commissioners.] 



RECEIPTS, AND FROM WHAT SOURCES, VIZ. 



;e on hand December 1, 1880, 








$3,800 14 


County tax. town of Sharon, 






322.71 


5 per cent, on licenses, 








495 82 


Prisoners' board from State, 








2,926 71 


Key fees, 








68 00 


Prisoners' labor, 








504.08 


Extra for board prisoners, 








17.50 


Pork sold, .... 








93 08 


Total receipts, 








$8,228 04 



EXPENDITURES, AND FOR WHAT PURPOSES, VIZ. : 

For Amount paid on orders, ..... $5,274.04 
Balance remaining in the Treasury, .... $2,954.00 



31 

Abstract of the Trensuv Y1DDLE8EX, 

for tlt< year mdimg November :;oM, 1881. 



[Certified by Willis E. Torrill, K. ('. Shepard ami Miuer C. Ilazen, County Com- 
missioners.] 



RECEIPTS, AND EHOM WHAT SOURCES, VIZ. 



Balance in Treasury December 1, 1880, 






16.63 


From State for board of prisoners, 






2. i - 


Commissioners' n . 






2,0 


County tax, . 






14.78 


5 per cent, on licenses, 






1' 


Transfer of licenses, 






4.00 


Labor of prisoners, 






4!< 


Debtor prisoners' board, 






3.00 


Extra board of prisoners, 






48 70 


For stone, $2.00; brick and oil, 15.80, 






7.80 


Provisions, .... 






50.43 


Coal 






11.00 


Heifer, ..... 






22.50 


Total receipts, 


. $10,572.74 



EXPENDITURES, AND FOR WHAT PURPOSES, VIZ. 



Paid Commissioners' orders from No. 345 to No. 551 

(except as stated below), ..... $7,702.52 

Interest on notes, . . . . . . . 39.31 

Notes paid, 2,000 00 

Outstanding orders, ....... .71 

Total expenditures, .... 



Balance remaining in Treasury, . 



$9,978.54 
$594.20 



I 



I 



32 

Abstract of the Treasurer's account for the county of TOLLAND, for 
the year ending November 30th, 1881. 



[Certified by Edwin D. Alvord, John R. Champlin and D. W. Huntington, County 

Commissioners. 1 



RECEIPTS, AND FROM WHAT SOURCES, VIZ. 



Balance on hand December 1, 1880, 
From loans made to county, 

Rent of County Buildings, 

5 per cent, of money received for licenses, 

Total receipts, . . ... 



$157.01 


1,011.80 


320.00 


255 15 



$1,743.96 



EXPENDITURES, AND FOR WHAT PURPOSES, VIZ. 



For Clothing, etc., for prisoners, 

Water rent, . . " . 

Fuel for Jail, 

Medicines and medical attendance, 

Chairs for jury, ..... 

Book and stationery, .... 

Repairs on County buildings, shingling court house, etc 
Costs of revocation of two licenses, 
Advertising, ...... 

Salary Treasurer, ..... 

14 Commissioners, .... 

Debts paid, ...... 

Total expenditures, .... 



$116.54 

25.00 

49.16 

86.15 

98 00 

19.30 

202.52 

73 24 

2.15 

15.63 

276.24 

432.60 

$1,396.53 



Balance in Treasury. 
Indebtedness of the county, 



$347.43 



$552.57 



33 



AMOUNTS OF LICENSE MONEY RECEIVED IN EACH 
COUNTY OF THE STATE AS RETURNED TO THE 
GOVERNOR BY THE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, FOR 
THE YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1881. 



TO^ 


t, 

II 

-•: 


Amounts 
Received 

fur 
Liquors. 




Amounts 
sired 
far 
Beer. 




Tote] Arm. nuts 
Ived. 


Hartford 1 Jodntt : 

Hartford 


294 


995 00 


31 

1 

1 
1 

•_> 

1 
7 
2 

1 
•_» 


$1,550.00 
50.00 

50.00 

50.00 

100.00 

50.00 

100 mi 
50.0< 

150 00 
100.00 


5 
20 

7 
7 
7 
10 
2 

1 
16 

4 
23 

1 

f> 
1 

5 

8 

12 


:>n ii) 







5 
19 

7 
7 

10 
2 

21 

1 

15 

79 

7 

2 

4 

1 
5 

1 

8 
12 


500 00 
l,8< 

7(H). on 
600.00 
990 "ii 
200 00 

2,060 00 
100.00 

1,500.00 

55 00 

700.00 

-DO 1)1) 

urn no 

1.77 
100.00 
70.00 

300.00 

800.00 

1,15000 


500.00 


Burlington 


1,855.00 

1 1 01) 


Q 


7" 


! lartford 


■ I on 




nby 

. 




2.16 


y 




Manchester 


1 . 5 1 


Britian 




Plainville 


- N 


Hill 

ury 

mgfc 'ii 


250.00 

4iMi.ni) 

1,92 

]i 


Sonili Windsor 

- eld 




Wethi 




Isoi 







1,15 


T • It 


529 


$50,340.00 


52 $2,600 00 


5S1 









< 



TOWNS. 


£ 3 


Amounts 
Eeceived 

for 
Liquors. 


5>g 

PQ a 

fc.3 


Amounts 

Eeceived 

for 

Beer. 


6 00 

~ a 


Total Amounts 
Eeceived 


New Haven County: 
New Haven 


409 

2 

1 

21 

72 

9 

7 

93 

11 

16 

14 

2 

12 

2 

19 

155 


$40,486.00 
200.00 
100 00 

1,711.00 

6,706.00 
792 00 
517.00 

9,418 00 
901.00 

1,600 00 
903 00 
200.00 

1,11800 
200.00 

1,859.00 
14,374.00 


113 

2 

6 

2 

4 

10 

1 

7 

1 

19 


$5,223.00 

38-00 
227.00 

75 00 
155.00 
398.00 

50 00 
226.00 

50.00 
710.00 


522 

2 

1 
23 
78 
11 
11 
103 
11 
17 
21 

2 
13 

2 

19 
174 


$45,709.00 


Beacon Falls 

Bethanv 


200.00 
100.00 


Branford 


1,749.00 


Derby o . . 

East Haven . . . , 


6,933.00 
867.00 


Hamden 


672.00 


Meriden 

Milford 


9,816.00 
901.00 


Nau'eratuck 


1,650.00 


Orange . . 


1,129 00 


Oxford 


200.00 


Seymour 


1,168 00 


Southbury 


200.00 


Wallingford 


1,859.00 


Waterburv 


15,084.00 






Totals 


845 

57 
89 
5 
1 
4 
7 
20 


$81,085.00 

$6,286.00 
9,200 00 
500.00 
100 00 
400.00 
700.00 
1.933 50 


164 

2 
3 

1 


$7,152.00 

$65.00 

11633 

50.00 


1009 

59 
92 

6 
1 
4 
7 
20 


$88,237.00 


New London County: 
New London 


$6,351 00 


Norwich 

Colchester ... 

Franklin 


9,31633 
550.00 
100 00 


Preston 


400.00 


Sprague 


700.00 


Stonington 


1.933 50 






Totals 

Fairfield County : 

Bridgeport 

Fairfield 


183 

205 

8 

2 

4 

35 

19 

11 

51 

46 

5 

2 

9 


$19,119 50 

$19,935.87 

758.00 

141.67 

350.00 

3,678.69 

1,81667 

1,100.00 

5,558.34 

4,199.67 

500.00 

133.33 

925.00 


6 
45 

4 
1 
1 
10 
7 
3 
1 


$231.33 
$2,181.00 

200.00 

25.00 

50.00 

500.00 

325.00 

150.00 

50.00 


189 

250 

8 
2 

4 

39 

20 

12 

61 

53 

8 

3 

9 


$19,350.83 

$22,116.87 
758.00 


Brookfield 


141.67 


Darien 


350.00 


D anbury 

Greenwich 


3,878.69 
1,841.67 


Newtown 

Nor walk 


1,150.00 
6,058.34 


Stamford 


4,524.67 


Stratford 


650.00 


Trumbull 


183.33 


Westport 


925.00 






Totals 


397 


$39,097.24 


72 


$3,481.00 


469 


$42,578.24 





35 



TOWNS. 


li 


A IHit^ 

K, «.-l \ til 

for 

Uqoon. 


li 

J 


Amount* 
vol 
for 
li.-.r. 




I'otnl Amount* 

V.'|. 


Windham County : 
»rd 


1 

2 


$200.00 
266 87 

5,166.69 


2 




1 

•> 


$200.00 


Sterling 


266.67 


Windham 


$100 00 31 


5,266 69 


Totals 


32 

4 
1 


$5,633.36 

$700.00 

100.00 


2 

6 

2 
1 
1 
9 
2 
4 
2 
1 


$100.00 :;i 


$5,733 36 


Litchfield County: 

Litchfield 

Barkhamsted 


$229.17 

100.00 

50 00 

50.00 

300.00 

100 00 

175 00 

100.00 

50 00 


10 

1 

2 
8 
3 
9 
3 
8 
11 
•> 


$920.17 

loom) 


Cornwall 


100.00 


New Milford 


7 
2 


1, -JIM). IK) 

400 00 


1,250.00 


Nortli Canaan 

urv 


450.00 
300.00 


Sharon 


1 
4 
9 

1 


200 00 

700.00 

1,612.50 

100.00 


300.00 


Thoron8ton 


875 nil 


Torrington 


1,712.50 


Water! own 


150.00 






Totals , . . . 


29 

47 
1 
2 
3 

3 

12 


$5,012.50 

$4,600.00 
100.00 
200.00 
241 07 

175.ni) 
1 150 00 


28 * 1.154.17 


57 

56 

1 


$6,10'). 07 
$5,050.00 


Middlesp:x County: 
MiddletowD 


9 


$450.00 


Ftaddam 


* '1 

1 50.00 
1 :>n 00 
7 350.00 


100 00 


Cromwell 


2 200.IM) 


1 1 addam 


4 291.67 


Old Say brook 

Portland 


4 
19 


225.00 

1 500 00 








Totals 


68 $6,466.67 


18 15900.00 


86 $7.366 67 


Tolland County: 
Coventry 


3 


$300.00 


1 
1 

6 


$£ 

25.00 

300 00 


4 

4 
•j 

36 


$35<). no 
120.00 


Ellington 


1 95.00 
4 372 00 

30 2,761.00 


o 

era 


372.00 


Vernon 


3,061.00 






$3,903.00 




- ; 


8 


; $375.00 


46 







■ 



{ 



I 



SUMMARY. 



COUNTIES. 



Hartford 

New Haven 
New London 
Fairfield 
Windham . . . 

Litchfield 

Middlesex . . . 
Tolland 



Totals . . 



529 

84 5 

183 

397 

32 

29 

68 

38 



2121 



Amounts 
Received 

for 
Liquors. 


cq t 
c ° 

£3 


$50,340.00 


52 


81,085.00 


164 


19,119 50 

39,097 24 

5,633.36 

5,012.50 


6 

72 

2 

28 


6,466.67 
3,528.00 


18 
8 


$210,282 27 


350 



Amounts 

Kt-ceived 

for 

Beer. 


£3 


$2/300.00 


581 


7,152 00 


1009 


231.33 


189 


3,481.00 


469 


100.00 


34 


1,154.17 


57 


900.00 


86 


375.00 


46 


$15,993 50 


2471 



Total Amounts 
.Received. 



$52,940.00 

88,237 00 

19,350.83 

42,578.24 

5,733.36 

6,166.67 

7,366.67 

3,903 00 



$226,275.77 



REPORT 



Adjutant -General 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT, 



ro THE 



COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF. 



FOR THE YEAR 1881 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE LEGISLATURE. 



M W HAVEN 

TUTTLE. MOREHOUSE &. TAYLOR, PRINTERS, 371 STATE STREET. 



I 



REPORT 



Si \ i i. 01 CONNl I i 

A Mi rANT-GENERAL'S OFF! 

1 I \i: i I ORD, I ' I, l88l. 

His Excellency H OB ART B. BlGELOW, 

Governor <n/</ Commander-in-Chief: 

Sir: I have the honor to report herewith, as required 

bv law, the condition of the National Guard, with a ros- 
ter of its Commissioned Officers and other matters per- 
taining to the force. 

[NSPECTION AND DISBANDMENTS. 

The changes in the National Guard during the past 
year have been numerous and important. At the time I 
came into office in January last, the force consisted of 44 
companies of infantry and two platoons of artillery, the 
total number of men according to the muster of Novem- 
ber, 1SS0, being 2914. The General Assemblv of [881 
considering that the National Guard co-aid be somewhat 
reduced without impairing its efficiency, passed an act 
limiting the active militia to 40 companies of infantry, 
and one battery ot artillery, and directing that the force 
be reduced to that number before July ist, [881, on an 
inspection to be made in Maw This limit of 40 con 
nies of infantry was the same as that under the law : 
gani/ing the National Guard, passed in [871, but it had 

bv action ot the General Assembly <>t 1879, Deen n,_ 

14 companies, which, with the maximum al- 

v law to each company, would give a total I 

. or one active militia man to <\<i \ [62 ot popula- 
tion, without counting the four companies I <■ >vernor's 

( ni ards. 



4 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

Believing- that the inspection, under which the reduc- 
tion of the force was to be made, should be thorough and 
impartial, I applied to the General of the Army for an 
officer of the regular service to perform the duty, and 
Major Tully McCrea, Captain ist U. S. Artillery, was 
detailed and directed to report for the duty required. 
Prior to the inspection two companies were disbanded, 
it being very evident from their condition that no in- 
spection was required to demonstrate the fact that they 
were of no further use to the State as active militia. 

The inspection was made at the regular parade in May, 
each company being inspected in its own town, oppor- 
tunity being given for drill and company maneuvers. 
The report of Major McCrea was full and decisive, 
and action thereon was taken June 20th. Only two com- 
panies were required to be disbanded to reduce to the 
limit defined under the law, but the standing of five of 
the companies was found so low that it was thought best 
to disband the five, these organizations being marked by 
the inspector as having secured less than 20 points out of 
possible 53. 

The companies disbanded prior to inspection were 
Co's H, Third regiment, and H, Fourth regiment, and 
those disbanded under the inspection, were Co's C and I 
First regiment, F, Third regiment, C, Fourth regiment, 
and D, Fifth battalion. The report of the inspection will 
be found in another part of this report, to which I re- 
spectfully call attention. The duty performed by Major 
McCrea was arduous and delicate, but was so impartially 
and agreeably performed as to win for him a lasting 
friendship in the National Guard ; the service rendered 
has been of incalculable benefit to the companies and 
was fully appreciated by this department. 

By the disbandment of the 7 companies referred to, the 
active force was reduced to 37 companies of infantry and 
one battery of artillery consisting of 4 guns. The 37 com- 
panies of infantry are divided into regiments and battal- 
ions as follows: First regiment, 8 companies; Second 
regiment, 10 companies ; Third regiment, 8 companies ; 



[882.] \l\lt I W r-Gl \l RA1 'S Rl l 

Fourth regiment, 8 companies ; Fifth battalion (colored), 
3 companies. The total force as per muster oi Novera 
ber, 1S2334; the maximum allowed for the lull force au- 
thorized by law, under the limit ol 66 nun to a company 
prescribed in General Orders No. }, series ol 1880, would 
be 2885, alu ' with 82 men to a company would be 
1 am ol the opinion thai the force as now constitu- 
ted is large enough for the present needs ol the State, 
and 1 urgently recommend thai no additional companies 
be accepted during the coming year. 

ENCAMPMENTS. 

Smcc 1871 it has hem the custom to encamp but two 
regiments and the artillery of the National Guard each 

year, which, with the one day's parade- in the spring, gave 
them seven days' duty ; the two regiments not encamped 
having only one day's parade in the spring and one day 
in the fall ; this has been found necessary by reason of the 
force and the various large expenditures necessary 
for uniforms, equipments, etc. The reduction of the force 
by seven companies, and no very large expenditure being 
required, outside the regular expenses except for over- 
coats for two regiments, 1 was confident that the four 
regiments of infantry and the artillery could be encamped 
without exceeding the expenditures for 1880. I therefore 
deemed it for the best interest of the State, and especially 
of the National Guard, that the four full regiments and 
artillery should be encamped this v< ar. and if possible 
this force should be sent into camp every year. It has 
1 fully shown that when the tour of camp dut v occurs 
Only once in two years, what has been learned at on 

campment is very largely forgotten before another tour 
of dut v is performed. 
The encampment this year was participated in by three 
ments only and the artillery, the General Assembly 
having by special act directed the detail of one 
incut to represent the State at the Yorktown Centennial 
celebration in October last, and under that act the I 

aient was selected and excused from camp duty. 



I 






6 . adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

The three, regiments encamped were the Second, Third, 
and Fourth, and with the artillery went into camp at Ni- 
antic, under General S. R. Smith, the brigade commander, 
Monday, September 5, and remained until Saturday, Sep- 
tember 10 ; the camp duties were seriously interfered 
with by the Centennial celebration at Groton and New 
London, September 6, in which the entire militia force 
participated, except the Fifth battalion, and by the ex- 
ceedingly hot and exhausting day of September 7th. 
While it is pleasant and perhaps necessary that the Na- 
tional Guard shall take part in the large celebrations in 
the State, and sometimes out of it, still I think that such 
participation should be outside the time required for 
camp duty, and that hereafter it will be best that each or- 
ganization shall be required to perform its annual duty 
at camp for six full days, and further that as the full du- 
ties of a soldier cannot be properly learned without reg- 
ular instruction in camp duties, that every member 
shall be required to attend when not incapacitated by 
sickness. 

The attendance at camp this year was very creditable, 
the rolls in this office showing that 1506 men were pres- 
ent and 155 absent — a percentage present of the total 
membership of 91. Of the absentees'24 were sick, 27 ab- 
sent with leave and 104 without leave. Taken in connec- 
tion with these figures, the attendance of the First regi- 
ment at the Yorktown Centennial celebration, and that 
of. the Fifth battalion on their fall parade at Charter Oak 
Park, 1 find that the attendance of the National Guard at 
the fall parades was 2139, and 252 absent — showing 89. 
per cent, present and performing duty. 

The presence at the encampment of last year of an 
officer of the United States Army having had a beneficial 
effect, application was made to the General of the Army 
to detail an officer to be present at the encampment of 
1881, and Colonel H. B. Clitz, 10th U. S. Infantry, was 
detailed by the following order: 



[882 kD) U TAN T-GENERAL's REPORT, 

III ADQUARTERS DEPAR lMENT OJ PHI I 

Goi i RNoa'a Island, N. ^ 1 1 .. Augusi ro, 188] 
u Ordi rs / 

\ i | j. J 

| i KTRA< i . | 

i. In compliance with Instructions from the General ol the Army, ind in 
accordance with .1 request oi the Governoi ol ihe State, Colonel ll. B. Clijz,, 
toth Infantry, stationed al Fori Wayne, Michigan, is detailed to be present 
during the encampment oi the Connecticut National Guard .it Niantic, Con- 
lays, commencing Septembei 5th next, 

Bl COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL HANCOCK: 

Will I \M (i. Ml Kill I I , 

I <<//. 

lonel ClitZ was present at the parade in New London 

and Groton Sept. 6th, and reported at camp Wednesday, 
Sept. 7th. A copy of his report has been received 
from General Drum, Adjutant-General U. S. A., and not 
having been published in General Orders, is included in 
this report. I fully concur in the expression of my pre- 
decessor, Generaj Harland, that "the attendance of 
officers of the regular army at the annual encampments 
should be encouraged for our own benefit and that there 
may be a closer connection between the regular and vol- 
unteer service." 

1 expect that the day is not far distant when the regu- 
lar troops and the militia of the States will encamp 
■\\cv each vear for military drill and instruction. 
The experience at the Yorktown centennial celebration 
has, I think, demonstrated that the plan is feasible, and I 
shall hope to hear that encampments of that nature are 
projected. The National Government should certainly 
see the necessity of doing all in its power t<> educate in 
proper military camps the active militia of the States in 
connection with the regular army. 

While our encampments are in the mam generally 

Successful, and the duties arc ably and well per- 
formed. 1 am in hopes thai ^<>me plan may be devised 

whereby the first and last days <■! the encampment may 

be more fully Utilized for drills and camp duties. The 

ps should all be in tamp Monday morning b\ 



8 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

o'clock, and the guard mounted before noon, and thus 
the entire afternoon could be devoted to drill. The regu- 
lar routine of the last day of the encampment is seriously 
interfered with by the bustle and hurry of breaking camp, 
which takes all the morning, and as soon as dinner is over 
the entire command is started for home. At least half of 
the first and last days should be used for camp instruc- 
tion, which I believe is possible and practicable. There 
have been recommendations at different times that the 
regiments be sent to camp on Saturday afternoon and 
thus secure a full working day on Monday, but for various 
reasons this plan does not seem best. 

Considerable dissatisfaction was expressed by the 
Fourth regiment at the delays in their transportation 
home from the last encampment, some of the companies 
not arriving at their armories until after midnight of 
Saturday. Whether the delays were the fault of the 
railroad, or the regiment in not being ready at the 
time ordered, I am unable to say, but in either case the 
delays were very vexatious, and I trust that experience 
has demonstrated where the faults are, that they may 
be avoided in future. 

GROTON CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. 

Your Excellency having given permission for the 
National Guard to participate in the centennial celebra- 
tion at Groton Heights, General Smith and his entire com- 
mand from camp were present, and with the addition of the 
First regiment, were the main features of the celebration. 
The important part of the day's operations consisted of 
the storming of old Fort Griswold, garrisoned by U. S. 
troops from Fort Trumbull, under command of Major 
Frank, by the Connecticut Brigade under General Smith. 
The troops were all in light marching order, and although 
the day was one of peculiar warmth and phenomenal 
atmosphere, they performed their duty with zeal and 
alacrity, and were undoubtedly benefitted by the nature 
of the duty, which partook in a large degree of the 
character of a regular battle. The troops also made a 



[882.] AMI l \\ l -GEN1 RA1 'S Rl P< >H I . 

parade in New London and passed in review before Gen 
eral Sherman and other Invited guests. 

The beauty and effect ol the day's celebration was 
largely enhanced by the presence in New London harbor 
of the United States North Atlantic Squadron, under 
command ol Rear Admiral Wyman. 

YORK h >\\ \ (III BR \ I [( >V 

At the urgent and special requesl ol the Yorktown 
Centennial Commission, the following act was passed by 
the General Assembly, for the representation ol this 
State in the observance of the centennial celebration of 
the surrender ol Lord Cornwallis, Oct. 15th to 20th, [881. 

SPECIAL ACT CLXXXIV. 
An A< 1 CONCERNING OH YORKTOWN CELEBRATION. 

Be it enacted by tin- Senate an J House of Representatives in I \embly 

ned : 

1. The Commander-in-Chief maw at his discretion, designate a 
ent of the National Guard to represent this State at the centennial 
celebration of the battle of York town. 

2. The spring parade and the encampment of the raiment so desig- 
nated shall be suspended for the year 1SS1, and the membt I regi- 
ment shall be allowed the regular pay for the same number of days' service 

that they would receive for the parades and encampments SO suspended. 
provided that they perform that number of days' service in representing the 
at Yorktown. 

3. The quartermaster-general shall provide transportation for the 
regiment and its camp equipage, and the sum of $3,000 is hereby appropri- 
ated therefor, and for camp expenses. Any additional cost of transportation 
shall be borne by 'he regiment. 

4. The Governor and staff, and the York town commissioner from 
ire directed to attend said centennial celebration, and the quar- 
termaster-general shall provide for transportation and > 

5. The Commander-in-Chief may direct the 6rst and second compa- 
nies of Governor's Foot Guards to accompany him t<> Yorktown, pr< 

that they will con-cm to i^> without any claim lor pel diem 01 Other allow- 
ance of am ee to pay for their own transportation, n 
and.comrr.i- ies, and in that event the sum of one thousand d 
is appropn h of said companies n 

I actually sends at least sixty men rank and file, with their 
officers, and i* present at Yorktown 
. r ! ! 14, 1 - - 



* 



1 



io adjutant-general's report. TJ an -> 

Under the provisions of this act the First regiment 
was selected to represent the State on that occasion, and 
as previously stated, was excused from camp duty, and 
the second company Governor's Foot Guards performed 
escort duty to the Governor. 

The regiment left the State Monday, Oct. 17th, by 
steamer ''Charleston," for Yorktown, accompanied by the 
Governor and Staff and escort. The selection of the 
mode of transportation was unfortunate, and the delays 
of a sea voyage were such that the steamer did not arrive 
at Yorktown until the morning of October 20th, and the 
troops were unable to take part in any of the ceremonies, 
except the march in review before the President: by 
quickly disembarking from the steamer, and a rapid 
march through the three miles of Yorktown dust, the 
regiment and the Governor's Guards were able to join the 
left of the infantry column of the troops under the com- 
mand of Major General Hancock, and passed the review- 
ing officer in good shape, being received with a hearty 
welcome and applause by the large crowd of interested 
spectators. The regiment was very unfortunate in its 
late arrival, and was obliged to appear in the column 
without the colonel having time to equalize the com- 
panies, the field and staff officers dismounted, and with- 
out an opportunity for the men to get accustomed to 
marohing after their long confinement of sixty-six hours 
on a steamer. 

The following report from the Army and Navy Journal 
will probably be read with as much interest as anything 
that I can write regarding the appearance of the regi- 
ment at Yorktown : 

"All now looked for the mounted batteries, but the 
strains of martial music and glistening of bayonets told 
that there was still another infantry command. What it 
was none could determine until the head of the column 
came into view, when the white helmets of the field and 
staff denoted the First regiment of Connecticut. When 
the fact became assured a cheer arose from the assembled 
multitude which threw into insignificance all the applause 



ami i \\ r-Gl \i R \i 'S REP< >R I. ! ! 

of the dav. ami as the regiment swung by with its solid 
Fronts, though time had not allowed for them to be equal- 
ized, the applause told of the relief experienced l>\ the 

sate arrival of the steamer Charleston. The man hing of 

the regiment was superb, its distances well preserved, 
and alignments perfect, and the feeling <>t rehet.it their 

arrival was followed bv one of sorrow that Colonel 

>our's regiment was not on the ground at an earlier 

<,\av and given a ehanee to compete tor the Tiffany v.. 

Alter the review the regiment returned to tie- steamer, 
not going into camp. The regiment, desiring to achieve 
honors in addition to those to he gained at Vorktown, had 

projected an extension of their trip to Charleston. South 
Carolina, and were amply repaid therefor. It left the 
next morning tor Fort Monroe, where a lew hours were 
most pleasantly spent in viewing that famous fortress 
intimately connected with many stirring scenes <»t the 
civil war. Leaving Fort Monroe at ii a.m., Friday, Oct. 
J I st. the steamer headed tor Charleston, S. C, where it 
arrived Sunday morning, Oct. 23d. The regiment and 
quests, including the Governor and escort, were most 
royally received by the citizens and military of Charles- 
ton, and every hour d\ their stay in that historic city 
was made pleasant and agreeable. On Monday the 
regiment and the Governor's Guards paraded under 
rt of the Fourth Brigade South Carolina Volunteer 
Troops, commanded bv Brigadier General C. Irvine 
Walker, and the entire command was reviewed by G 

ernor II ol South Carolina and the Governor of 

Connecticut. The various companies comprising the 
military representation from this State were banqu 
alter the parade, and friendships formed which 

will outlast the memories of the first two days' trip on 

the steamer M Charleston."' 

The behavior of the members ol the regiment in 

Charleston and in tact during the entire trip of twelve 

days, was most exemplary, not one incident occurrii 

reflect on the regiment or the State. I 

will with which the regiment aw*\ the representative 



( 



12 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

the State government were received, was very marked 
and fully appreciated 03' all, and the citizens and military 
of Charleston will be held in long- remembrance by the 
members who participated in the delights of the recep- 
tion so freely and cordially tendered. The excursion has 
certainly had the good effect to promote a better ac- 
quaintance between the citizens, and to bind in a closer 
union than ever before the States of South Carolina and 
Connecticut. Not feeling satisfied with the seaworthi- 
ness of the steamer, the troops came home by rail, 
arriving Friday night, Oct. 28th, without any accident. 

I feel that I should not do justice dto the First regi- 
ment, if I did not convey to the Colonel and to Ae entire 
command, through this report, my appreciation of their 
splendid drill, discipline and military appearance as the 
representative military body of Connecticut at Yorktown 
and Charleston. The wisdom of the selection w r as fully 
exemplified. 

PARADE OF THE FIFTH BATTALION. 

The Fifth Battalion, Major Welch, was not ordered into 
camp, as the law under which it was organized provides 
merely for one day's parade in the spring, and one day 
in the fall ; the fall parade of this command — 3 com- 
panies — was held at Charter Oak Park, near Hartford, on 
September 20. The command was drilled in company 
and battalion maneuvers, the day being fully occupied; 
owing to the death of President Garfield on the previous 
day, a contemplated parade of the battalion in Hartford 
that evening was abandoned. One company of this organi- 
zation was disbanded in June, but the battalion of three 
companies appears to be doing well under its new com- 
mandant, Major Welch. 

NOVEMBER MUSTER. 

The annual muster of the National Guard was made 
during the last ten days in November, but owing to the 
full and thorough inspection made by Major McCrea, in 
May last, I did not deem it necessary or advisable to have 



[882. \ I'll I A \ r-Gi neral's REPORT. 13 

a rigid inspection in November as had been customary. 
The returns of the muster show thai the force as now 
constituted is composed oi m missioned officers and 

2,172 enlisted men, a total force of 2,334. As compi 
with the mustei ol November, 1 880, this shows a loss oi 
and ol this number 340 is by the disband raent oi 
the 7 companies during the spi ing. The numbei present 
at muster was 1,946, and the number absent 388; per 
centage present, 83.37. The percentage present in 1880, 
was 75. The number present and absent by regiments, 
and the percentage present ol membership, was as 

to 1 1 1 > W S : 



< 



isi Regiment pi 


■ 47<> ; 


absei 


pei cent. 


present 




.. 


- . . . 




.. 


" 


88.92 


3d 


334; 


'• 134; 


" " 


" 


7136 


4th 


39°; 


'• 1x3; 


" " 


" 


77.51 


5th Battalion, 


15; ; 


•' 19; 


11 


•• 


89.20 


Artillery, 


54; 


21 ; 


11 


" 


72.00 



The result ol the muster is generally very satisfactory, 

and shows as clearly as possible the condition of the force 
at this date. The attendance of members in the Firstand 
Second regiments and the Fifth battalion, proves that 
those organizations are in good condition and are reli- 
able for duty ; and while the Third and Fourth regi- 
ments show a good increase of attendance at muster 
over that of i88o, there is still room tor improvement in 
some of the companies of these commands. hi compa- 
nies A a\\A (i. Fourth regiment, and G, Third regiment, 
the small attendance is easily explainable, the two former 
companies having lost a large number of members by 
m of removal from the State; and the Captains not 
having given due care to their rolls t.> have the members 

discharged, and new recruits enlisted in their pla 

1 Gr, Third regiment, has suffered 1>\ absence <>i its 

tain, and his resignation has now been tendered. 

The condition of th< imands and company \. Third 

ment, require and will receive special attention. 

'The artillery has l><<-n consolidated as a battery, and 

placed under command ot Captain William II. Lee, tor 



1 



14 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

seven years Lieutenant commanding- the first platoon 
artillery of Guilford. The success of Lieutenant Lee as 
an artillery officer in the past, guarantees that this 
branch of the service will be well taken care of, and its 
drill and discipline will compare favorably with any or- 
ganization. The attendance at the muster of the second 
platoon artillery is not satisfactory, and will receive 
attention. 

One of the mustering officers reports that quite a number 
of members of two of the companies of his command alter- 
nate between this State and New Jersey, and if the mus- 
ter of those companies had been made one month earlier 
or two months later it would have made quite a differ- 
ence in the number present. One of the companies re- 
ferred to had but 56 per cent of its membership present 
at muster. It is easy to see that companies of that kind 
are not reliable in case of emergency, and while our 
force is limited as at present to 40 companies of 66 men 
each, it is very important that all shall be up to a proper 
standard of efficiency, and of the membership at least 
75 per cent, shall be reliable and convenient to call. 

CHANGES AND DISCHARGES. 

The changes in the active force during the year have 
been more numerous than ever before; 34 officers have 
resigned, 1 was discharged, and 4 have died in the ser- 
vice; the disbanded companies numbered 14 officers and 
326 enlisted men ; the number of enlisted men discharged 
during the year is 1,023, the causes for discharge being as 
follows: expiration term of service, 486; non-residence, 
334; disability. 33 ; benefit of the service, 132 ; dishonor- 
ably, 24: died in service, 14. The enlistments number 
816, and 6 officers have been appointed from civil life. 
The number promoted from the ranks to be commis- 
sioned officers is 26. 

The number of enlisted men discharged during the 
year — outside of the disbanded companies — is 397 more 
than in 1880, and much larger than ever before; these 
figures are all the more noticeable when it is remembered 



< 



AMI I \\ ! e,|\i l; U,*S l:l P< 'i: I I ; 

that the force was reduced from 44 to \J companies eai ly 
in the year. These changes in the enlisted force incn 
largely every year, and this yeai wnc due to two 
causes: first, i>\ reason ol the large number ol enlist- 
ments made in 1876, and the first ol tin- two year ree*n 
Listments made in 1679 expiring this year; second, the 
increased applications by commanding officers for dis- 
charge oi non-resident and inactive or inefficient mem- 
bers. 
It would appear from the large number oi dischaq 

by reason of non-residence, that there should be greater 

care in making enlistments, and that commanding officers 

should see that it is for their own interests to be more 

particular in regard to whom they enlist, and that prefer- 
ence in all cases should he given to those recruits whose 
residence appears to be fixed and permanent. 

Another cause tor discharge that is becoming- quite 
frequent, is "benefit of the service." This cause is 
supposed to cover all cases where a lack of interest in 
company matters is very noticeable, and the member 
tails to attend drills and pays no attention to the notices 
ot tines and dues unless strictly enforced under the 
law. 1 am of the opinion that members who have no 
interest in company matters and must be driven and 
coaxed to give attention to their duties should not be 
honorably discharged from the service, but that such 
members should, under proper rules, be dropped from 
the rolls as deserters and published as such in General 
( )rders. 

The law allowing ree'nlistments for two years, passed in 
1879, causes the figures to show a large change in 
the force which does not actually occur, as the- members 
1 e rally remain in continuous service, while our records 
show a discharge and an enlistmenj for each one. The 
number of reenlistments tor two years in 1879, wa k 

m l880, 67 : and lSS in 1SS1. 

{Changes in the active force include four 

who have died in service. Captain Edward K.Goodwin, 
('•>. E, 4th regiment, died at Bridgeport, D< 



I 



16 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

1880. Captain Goodwin served during the war of the 
rebellion as an officer in the 24th regiment, Conn. Vols., 
and after his return was prominent in the organization of 
a company for the National Guard, which was accepted 
and organized August 25, 1865, he being commissioned 
as first lieutenant, and January 31, 1868, was promoted 
to be captain, which commission he held until his death. 
His record as an officer was long and honorable, and his 
attention to his duties was marked by a faithfulness 
seldom surpassed. Captain Goodwin was at his death the 
senior captain in the service. 

Rev. George A. Parkington, Chaplain 4th Regiment, 
died at New Haven, February 11, 1881, after an honorable 
service of nearly four years. 

Lieutenant Joshua L. Howard, Quartermaster 5th bat- 
talion died at New Haven, July 10, 1881, his appointment 
as Quartermaster dating December 20, 1879. 

Captain Maurice F. Brennan, Co. C, 2d Regiment, died 
at New Haven, November 29, 1881. Captain Brennan 
joined the National Guard in 1866 and served as corporal 
sergeant, second lieutenant and captain, his commission 
as captain dating December 4, 1874. He was the senior 
captain of the 2d Regiment, and was an officer noted for 
his carefulness and efficiency. 

TARGET PRACTICE. 

The report of the Brigade Inspector of Target Prac- 
tice, which is appended to this report, does not give as 
favorable a showing of target practice during the year as I 
had reason to expect. The number reported as qualify- 
ing as sharpshooters and marksmen is as follows : First 
regiment, sharpshooters 26; marksmen 213. Second reg- 
iment, sharpshooters 19; marksmen 61. Third regiment, 
sharpshooters 4 ; marksmen 13. Fourth regiment, sharp- 
shooters 27 ; marksmen 25. Fifth battalion, sharpshooters 
2; marksmen 1. Brigade staff, sharpshooters 4; total 
sharpshooters 82; marksmen 313. Whole number of 
sharpshooters and marksmen 395. 1 think it is evident, 
from a casual examination of the returns, that the above 



!SS ! AMI r\\ r-GENERAL'S REPORT. I ; 

es will have to be soraewhal reduced before the 
badges are issued, as it appears b) the Inspei tor's report 
that the orders in regard to classification have not in 
all cases been fully observed. The number oi marksmen 
returned last year was 546, showing a decrease <>\ 151 
this year. 

The Inspector reports that the greater part «>t this de- 
ficiency is owing to the lack <>t range accommodations, 
and recommends that the entire supervision «»t establish- 
ing ami furnishing rifle ranges be placed in the hands of 
the Brigade Inspector <>t Target Practice. 1 am not 
prepared to endorse this recommendation, as I believe 
the matter can, and ought to he fully attended to by the 
Quartermaster-General. It the companies have made 

their requisitions tor ranges Or repairs which have not re- 
ceived attention, the State is then most certainly at fault 
in not supplying means for members of the National 

Guard to qualify in the various classes as required by 
Genera] Orders No. 7. Adjutant-General's Office, June 
1st. 1SS1, hut if the companies have tailed to call tor any 
necessai v repairs to ranges, then the fault would seem to 
be a lack of interest on their part. 

In order to have the classification in target practice 
fully and correctly commenced. I directed that all of the 
dav for spring parade, not required for inspection and 
muster, should be devoted to target practice under the 
supervision of the inspectors of target practice, and 
where companies had qualified over 50 per cent, ol marks- 
men the previous year, they were allowed to practice in 
volley and tile firing:, extra ammunition being: allowed tor 
that purpose. The results of the practice on that dav for 
the entire brigade have not been received at this other. 
but the returns of the volley and file firing were very sat- 
isfactory, and a sure indication that those companies have 
been largely benefitted by their practice. 

'I'he Inspector also recommends the continuation of the 

plan of devoting the whole or a part of the day author- 
ized lor spring parade to instruction in 
under the regimental insp and while the money 



I 



I 
I 



1 8 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

thus spent would seem to be well invested, I am in hopes 
that if it is again attempted next year, all of the classifica- 
tion required of the companies will be carried out and 
not allowed to drop with the close of that day's practice, 
as was evidently the case in a large number of companies 
the past year. 

Full and complete instructions for target practice and 
classification were issued to the National Guard in Gene- 
ral Orders No. 7, dated June 1, 1881, but outside of the 
First regiment, five companies in the Second regiment, 
and one company in the Fourth regiment, its require- 
ments do not appear to have been very fully complied 
with. That its provisions are not too burdensome is fully 
proven by the fact that six companies of the First regi- 
ment have qualified 239 men for the State decoration — 
two companies being reported as unable to qualify by 
reason of the State not supplying them with a range. 

The Quartermaster-General reports that the ammuni- 
tion issued to the different regiments during the year is 
as follows: First regiment, 15,952 rounds; Second regi- 
ment, 7,000 rounds; Third regiment, 4,000 rounds; 
Fourth regiment, 5,700 rounds; Fifth battalion, 1,500 
rounds. 

MILITARY ENROLLMENT. 

The General Assembly of 1881 passed an act changing 
the time for making the military enrollment from July 
and August of each year to the months of October, No- 
vember, December, January and February annually. 
By reason of this change in the law, no enrollment of 
those liable to military duty could be made in 1881 and 
the towns have been obliged, under the law, to pay a 
commutation tax on the enrollment of 1880. The act also 
authorized the " town treasurers in making payment of 
commutation tax, to deduct therefrom a sum equal to that 
part of the commutation taxes placed upon the rate bills 
of their respective towns which cannot be collected, not 
to exceed ten per cent, of such taxes." I am informed 
by the State Treasurer, that under this provision of the 



_\] ADJUTANT-GENERAL*! I . 

law, deductions have been made by the town treasurers 
to the extent of nearly $9,000, and thai the commutation 

tax a- collected Will amount to about $q6,000. 

J*he deduction clause in the law works to some disad- 
vantage with the State (Treasurer; from the returns he 
has received from this office heretofore, of the military 
enrollment, he has known just how much commutation 
tax to expect, hut under the present system he cannot 

tell whether the amount due will be paid in full, two per 

cent., five per cent, or ten per cent, deducted. And fur- 
ther the State auditors are unable to judge whether the 
payments agree with the returns unless they go through 
the whole deductions of the various towns. For these 

■ us the Treasurer recommends that the deductions 
which are now made by the town treasurers should be 
made in the same manner and under the same conditions 
by the selectmen from their return of the enrollment. 
The returns to the Treasurer would then show just, what 
amounts the towns were liable for and should pay. 

I think the time tor making the enrollment, October 
1st to March 1st, has been extended too long, and that it 
will not be of advantage to the towns. The experi- 
ence of this office shows that the enrollment can as well 
be made in one month as in rive. 1 am confident that at 
the end ot the first three months for making the enroll- 
ment, not over five towns will have reported, and that 
the enrollments of three quarters of the towns will not be 
made until February. For some reasons, as presented to 
the Finance committee of the Genera] Assembly of issi, 
I think that the change will work to the benefit of the 
towns in making their collections from those liable to the 
tax. Under the old law the enrollment was made nearly 
ir before the names of those liable to tax could be 
placed on the rate bills tor collection, and by that time 
many had removed from the towns. 

EXP] NS1 S OF I HI \ \ l [ONAL GUARD. 

I learn from the Comptroller that he reports the ad- 
vances toand expenditures of the National Guard for the 



( 






20 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

year ending November 30, 1881, as $119,512.34. These 
figures, while showing the actual advances made by the 
Comptroller to the military department, do not show the 
actual expenditures for the military force of the State, and 
for this reason I think it best to analyze the figures and 
see just what the expenses have been. The advances to 
this office by the Comptroller have been $2,133.59, an d 
that would appear to be the expenses of the office, but 
the vouchers as returned to the Comptroller from Nov. 
30, 1880, to Nov. 30, 1881, show that the actual expenses 
have been $1,908.71. The advances to the Quartermaster 
General's department have been $67,000. Of this sum 
$2,000 was advanced to Quartermaster-General Wessells 
prior to Jan. 1st, 1881, and $1,1 13 of that sum was used to 
pay for overcoats for the Governor's Guards. Of the bal- 
ance, $463.76 was returned by General Wessells to the 
treasury. The present Quartermaster-General reports 
his expenditures as $54,787.83, which leaves $10,212.17 to 
be accounted for. Of this amount $3,000 is the special 
appropriation for transportation of the First regiment 
to Yorktown, and can hardly be considered regular ex- 
penses of the National Guard. The balance, $7,212.17, 
which the Quartermaster-General reports as in his hands, 
cannot be considered as expenses of 1881, unless there 
are bills contracted for and still unpaid. The amount 
advanced to the Paymaster-General, $40,000, has nearly 
all been used in payment of pay-rolls and vouchers duly 
approved in this office ; the amount reported by him as 
on hand is $460.53. The amount paid for salaries 
$9,772.65, is not a part of the National Guard expenses, 
and would be more properly charged to salary account. 
I find therefore that while the Comptroller's report 
would appear to show that the expenses of the Na- 
tional Guard, according to advances made by him have 

been $119,512.34 

there can properly be deducted therefrom the 

Balance in Adjutant-General's hands, $ 204.88 

Overcoats for Governor's Guards, - 1,113.00 

Balance returned by General Wessells, - - 463.76 



[88 ADJUTAN r-Gl M R W 'S Rl POR l. 

Transportation First regiment t" Vorktown, - '$3*00 

[n bands ol Quartermaster-General, - 

In hands ol Paymaster-Geueral, .... 4'"»-53 

Salary account, '>.;:-• 



. ing actual expenses *>t National Guard i"i 
the fiscal yeai ol [881, as ..-.-. $^7,285.35 

Under these circumstances I would respectfully sug- 
gest that allot the military departments be required to 
render their vouchers to the Comptroller monthly, or 
quarterly; all vouchers to show under what law or author- 
ity paid, the same to be audited and verified by the Comp- 
troller, and at the end of the year by the State auditors. 
It this can be done the Comptroller's books will show at 
any time the actual expenses of any and all the military 
departments. 

ARMORIES. 

Under the provisions of the Militia Law the armories 
For the National Guard are provided by the Quarter- 
master General, on requisitions duly approved by the 
Adjutant-General. It has been found advisable and 
necessary, up to the present time, to secure tor armories 
the most suitable hall that the town afforded where- a 
company was located. This has led to .many embarrass- 
ments and difficulties, especially in the large cities. 
where it has been found necessary to secure halls in the 
third, fourth, and tilth stories ot buildings not always 
well and agreeably located. These high buildings are 
not always constructed so as t<> withstand with safety the 
drilling <>i large or even small bodies of men. and in 

some cases the walls have Cracked and drills have had to 

suspended; in other cases the accommodations have 

been SO Small and cramped that suitable and proper 

rooms could not be obtained for storage ami safe keeping 
ot arms, uniforms and equipments, and in many instai 
the State property has been injured and destroy* 

Furthermore, in large cities the companies have b 
widely - I. and in < ase <>i dangei •»! tumult much 



I 



t 



22 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

trouble would result in concentrating the scattered com- 
mands, and the chances are that considerable damage 
might be committed before a proper and necessary con- 
centration could be made. This is a matter of great 
importance, and it will be very evident to all who give 
it even but passing attention, that five companies located 
in one building would be much stronger and quicker 
prepared to meet any emergency than if located in five 
different buildings and some distance apart. 

Many of the armories now in use are so small that a 
company can be formed in line but one way of the 
room, and very few are of proper size for drilling a com- 
mand in the necessary company and battalion movements, 
and there is but one armory in the State suitable for 
drills of four or more companies. 

All this leads me to suggest and recommend that the 
time has arrived when the State should own or control 
large armories, that are suitable for military purposes, in 
all the large cities. 

Through the public and military spirit of the Colonel 
of the First regiment, the companies of that command, 
located in Hartford, have a large and fine armory, em- 
bracing a commodious drill hall 180X85, and on the 
ground floor ; company rooms for meeting purposes, 
rooms for keeping of arms, uniforms and equipments, 
suitable quarters for the field, staff, and non-commissioned 
staff officers and band ; also a rifle gallery very fully 
equipped ; this armory is leased by the State, but it 
should in some manner have a more perfect control of it 
so that it could be considered permanent. 

The city of New Haven has within its limits eight com- 
panies of military, consisting of six companies of the Na- 
tional Guard, and two of Governor's Guards; these com- 
panies are located in five different buildings, none of the 
armories being suitable for a battalion drill, review or 
inspection. I am of the opinion that an armory can be 
built in New Haven large enough and suitable for all the 
companies located there, and that the yearly rental or 
investment will not be two-thirds of the sum now paid 



iSS_\| Ahll l.\N l-«.l \l K \l .*> Rl POR I. 

for the five detached armories. The interests of the State 
in the welfare and reliability oi the National Guard 
require that regimental armories shall be established in 
large cities as soon as possible. 

I would respectful}} suggest thai this matter be 
ferred to the General Assembly at its coming session. 

CAMl 1 CKol M>. 

An Act was passed by the last General Assembly 
authorizing the appointment oi a Commission to select 
and purchase a piece of land lor a permanent camp 
ground for the National Guard, and appropriating 

$10,000 therefor. The Commission, of which the- Quarter- 
master - general is president, has had two or three 
meetings, but I cannot learn that anything definite has 
been accomplished toward securing- the ground. It 
appear^ to me imperatively necessary that the ground 
should be selected and purchased immediately, so that it 
may be put in proper condition for the encampment of 
There can hardly be found anywhere a tract of 
land sufficiently large for the encampment of the 
entire force, but will require considerable work to 
place it in good condition and prepare proper accommo- 
dations. The ground at Niantic, so often used for camp 
purposes, is favorably considered by the Commission, 
and I presume will be purchased or condemned for the 
State as authorized by the special act. 

REGULATIONS. 

The General Assembly of l88l having authorized the 
publication of regulations tor the government of tin- Na- 
tional Guard, a Board was organized by Special Orders, 
No. i6, Adjutant-General's ott February r, for 

the purpose ol drafting a code ol regulations for the guid- 
ance and government ol the National Guard, under ex- 
isting laws, and to recommend any changes m the law 

simplify and improve the 
same. The members constituting the Hoard are, Bi 



1 



1 

< 



24 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

dier-General Stephen R. Smith ; Colonel William H. 
Tubbs, Third Regiment ; Colonel Lucius A. Barbour, 
First Regiment ; Colonel Charles P. Graham, Second Reg- 
iment ; Colonel George S. Crofut, Fourth Regiment ; 
Colonel Simeon J. Fox, Assistant Adjutant-General, and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis L. Morgan, Brigade Adjutant. 
The Board has been delayed in its work by the desire 
to await the publication of the new United States Army 
regulations, preferring to be guided in their labors by the 
regulations governing the army, and as these have at last 
been issued, they intend to hold regular sessions and 
finish their work as soon as may be possible. I hope that 
the regulations will be completed and ready for the Na- 
tional Guard prior to another encampment. 

UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENTS. 

The uniforms of the National Guard are all in good 
condition, and the entire force, except the three compa- 
nies of the Fifth battalion, is now fully armed, uni- 
formed and equipped. Two regiments, the Second and 
Fourth, were supplied with new overcoats this year, 
leaving the Fifth battalion only as unsupplied with over- 
coats and knapsacks. The First, Third and Fourth regi- 
ments, the Fifth battalion and the artillery are uni- 
formed in dark blue frock coats and light blue pants, 
with helmets, fatigue caps and blouses. The uniform is 
neat and serviceable. I regret to say that one regiment, 
the Second, is still uniformed in the gray cut away coat, 
heavily padded and trimmed, the cross belts also being 
retained. It is unfortunate that the Second regiment was 
not uniformed like the rest of the Brigade, in the blue 
frock coat, both for uniformity and serviceability. I trust 
that a change in the uniform of that regiment can be 
effected at no very distant day. 

The accoutrements now in use by our Guard are not of 
the more modern kind, and the time is soon coming 
when a change will be required in the cartridge-boxes, 
belts and bayonet-scabbards ; those now in use have 
been in active service since 1872, and as soon as our ex- 



) 



A I Ml' I W I -i .! \ I RA1 'S R] P< 'I: l . 

penses will allow 1 shall recommend a substitution oi the 
I scabbard and the improved cartridge box. 

PENSK 'N \M' B< »i NTIES. 

I refer to the report ol Colonel Fox, Assistant Adju 
tant-Cic-iRT.il. for information in regard to the Pension 
and Bounty business prosecuted through this office the 
past year. This branch ol the businessoi the office is im- 
portant ami requires constant attention and arduous 
labor. The claims now being settled were filed t w 
years and more ago, but they carry with them arrears for 
fifteen and sixteen years, and are therefore gladly wel- 
comed by the soldier recipients. The number oi new- 
claims now being filed is small compared with the years 
1879 and 1880, but the demand by the pension office for 
additional evidence and testimony increases largely every 

ir, and adds greatly to the labor and difficulty of prov- 
ing the claims, and more than doubles, the work in this 
office as compared with five years ago. 

The magnitude of the amount required to pay pensions, 
under the Arrears Act of [878, asannounced by the Com- 
missioner of Pensions, appears to astound the people, but 
justice now requires that this law shall be fairly carried 
out and full payment made. 

CONCLUSK -\. 

In concluding this report, 1 desire to convey to your 
Excellency my appreciation of the court 'ended to 

me by yourself and staff, and the officers of the National 
Guard in general. The Stal onnecticut possesses 

a military fore of which it has reason to be proud, and 
which if well for, will continue to be reliable and 

trustworthy. Th< tains a larger ; of 

tive members than ever before, and the ofl n- 

erallv are attentive to their duties, gentlemanly and a 

effici 

I would take this occasion to recommend thai 1 . ( ren- 
ted to authorize the appointment 

( ! neral on the staff of the Com- 



I 



26 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

mander-in-Chief. There are many points and questions 
continually arising that call for opinions, and there is no 
person to whom such questions, which involve military 
law, can be referred. 

I submit herewith for your consideration the following 
reports, tables, etc. 

i. Roster of National Guard. 

2. Abstract of Muster, November, 1881. 

3. Table of enlistments, discharges, etc. 

4. Consolidated morning reports of fall parades and 
encampments. 

5. Reports of Special Inspectors detailed from the Uni- 
ted States Army — Brigade Inspector of Target Practice 
— Examining Board — Board of Survey. 

6. Report, of Pension and Bounty business. 

7. General Orders and important Special Orders. 

I am, Sir, 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

Adjutant-General. 



[882. | ADJ1 i \\ I -Gl M RAL*S Rl P< >R I . 

hi 
ROSTER. 



COMMANDER IN CHIEF AND STAF1 

"iniamitr-in- Chief. 

HOBART B. BIGELOW, New Haven. 

.// — Rank, Brigadier- General. 

Date <>f Rank. 

GEORGE M. HARMON. New Haven, Jan. 5, 1881. 

Quarterm .;/ — Rank, Brigadier-General. 

ALEXANDER HARBISON. Hartford. Jan. 5, 1881. 

Surgeon-General — Rank, Brigadier-General. 

JAMES G. GREGORY. Nor walk, Jan. 5. 1881. 

Commissary- General — Rank, Brigadier- General. 
GEORGE H. FORD. New Haven, Jan. 5, 1881. 

Pay al — Ran-, Brigadier-General. 

FREDERICK E. CAMP, Middletown, Jan. 5, 1881. 

Aids to the Commander-in-Chief- — Rank, Colonel. 

WILLIAM E. HARROWS. Hartford, [an. 5, 1881. 

WILLIAM B. RUDD. Salisbury. Jan. 5, l88l. 

CHARLES \. RUSSELL, Killingly, Jan. 5, 1881. 

FRANK L. BIGELOW, New Haven. N 1S81. 

utant-General — Rank, Colonel. 
SIMEON I. FOX, New Haven, Maj 1 .1869. 

termaster- General— I ttenant-Col 

HENRY C. MORGAN, Colchesl i38i. 



28 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

CONNECTICUT NATIONAL GUARD. 

Brig a diet- Gen era I. 

Date of Rank. 
STEPHEN R. SMITH, New Haven, July 6, 1878. 

Brigade Adjutant — Bank, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
LEWIS L. MORGAN, New Haven, July 6, 1878. 

Brigade Inspector — Bank, Major. 
JOHN B. CLAPP, Hartford, July 6, 1878. 

Brigade Quartermaster — Bank, Major. 
THOMAS L. WATSON, Bridgeport, July 30, 1879. 

Brigade Commissary — Bank, Major. 
SAMUEL C. WALDRON, Stonington, July 6, 1878. 

Brigade Inspector of Target Practice — Bank, Major. 
JAMES E. STETSON, New Haven, Sept. 13, 1877. 

Aides-de-Camp — Bank, Captain. 

WILLIAM H. STEVENSON, Bridgeport, Mar. 29, 1879. 

EDWIN McNEIL, Litchfield, Dec. 21, 1880. 





ARTILLERY. 






BATTERY A. 




Rank. 


Name. Residence. 


Date of Rank. 


Captain, 


William H. Lee, Guilford, 


Nov. 28, 1881 



First Platoon. 

1st Lieutenant, William T. Foote, Guilford, Dec. 5, 1881. 

2d Lieutenant, Arthur S. Fowler, Guilford, Dec. 5, 1881. 

Second Platoon. 

1st Lieutenant, Holcomb N. Jones, Clinton, Dec. 6, 1880. 

2d Lieutenant, Reuben H. W. Kelsey, Clinton, Dec. 6, 1880. 



[882. A 1 > 1 1 I'.W r-GI M R ILS REPOR I , 



FIRST REGIMEN I 

met. 
Licit S \. BARBOUR, Hartford, June >6, 1878. 

Lieutenant- (. ol 

William 1 CON L. Hartford, June 26, 1878. 

Major. 
ARTHUR i. GOODRICH, Hartford, June 86, 1S78. 

. Idjuiani — Rank, Captain. 
JOHN K. WILLIAMS, Hartford, ■. 3, 1878. 

-Rank, First Lieutenant. 
RICHARD O. CHENEY, South Manchester, Aug. 3, 1S78. 

Paymaster — Rant, First I ieutenant. 
WILLIAM B. McfcRAY, Hartford, Aug. 23. 1878. 

Surgeon — Ran/:, Major. 
GEORGE W. AVERY, Hartford. Aug. 3, [878. 

Assist, ait Surgeon — Rank, First Lieutenant. 

HARMoN (,. HOWE, Hartford, Aug. 23, 1878. 

In'spe 'tor of Target Practice — Rank, Captain. 
JABEZ L. WOODBRIDGE, North Manchester, Jan. 19. 1877. 

Chaplain. * 

JAMES W. COOPER, New Britain, Aug. 30, 187S. 

Company A. 

lance. Date el Bank. 

Captain, William Westphal, Hartford, 15, 1877. 

1st Lieutenant, Edward Hartford, 17, 1874. 

id Lieutenant, Henry F. Smith, iford, Mar. 15, 1877. 

Company B. 

Captain, I M LAN, Hat" 

I ' Hartford, 1879. 

in, Hartford, Aug 



< 



30 



adjutant-general's report. 



[Jan., 



Company D. 

Rank. Name. Residence. Date of Rank. 

Captain, Augustus N. Bennett, New Britain, Nov. 20, 1877. 

1st Lieutenant, John C. Bingham, New Britain, Jan. 5, 1875. 

id Lieutenant, William E. Allen, New Britain, April 5, 1881. 



Company E. 

Captain, Charles B. Erichson, New Britain, Mar. 25, 1872. 

1st Lieutenant, Fred. M. Hemenway, New Britain, Aug. 6, 1877. 

id Lieutenant, George O. McLean, New Britain, Nov. 23, 1881. 

Company F. 

Captain, Levi H. Hotchkiss, Hartford, Nov. 21, 1881. 

1st Lieutenant, Thomas T. Welles, Hartford, Nov. 21, 1881. 

id Lieutenant, Alexander Allen, Hartford, Nov. 21, 1881. 



Captain, 

1st Lieutenant^ 

id Lieutenant, 



Company G. 



Arthur B. Keeney, 
Arthur J. Wetherell, 
Thos. H. Montgomery, 



S. Manchester, 
Manchester, 
S. Manchester, 



Sept. 1, 1879. 
Sept. 1, 1879. 
Sept. 1, 1879. 



Company H. 

Captain, George A. Cornell, Hartford, Dec. 3, 1880. 

1st Lieutenant, Henry Simon, Jr., Hartford, Dec. 3, 1880. 

id Lieutenant, John W. Crane, Hartford, July 26, 1881. 



Company K. 

Captain, Thomas M. Smith, Hartford. Feb. 10, 1879. 

1st Lieutenant, Charles E. Thompson, Hartford, Feb. 10, 1879. 

id Lieutenant, Samuel O. Prentice, Hartford, Feb. 10, 1879. 



iSSj. ) \!>ir r.w r-Gl m R \i *S REP< >RT. Jl 

i OND REGIMEN! . 

net. 

CHARLES P, GRAHAM, Middletown, July 15, 

utenant-Col 
[OSIAH N BACON, New Haven, • 3, 1S75- 

.1/ fl 

CHARLES K. BANNON, Waterbury, Aug. 15, 1881. 

uiant — Rank, Captain. 
JOSEPH T. ELLIOTT, Middletown, Mar. 21, l88l. 

<, Quartermaster — Rank, First Lieutenant. 

CLAY ION H. REDFIELD, New Haven, Sept. 30, 1878. 

utstet — Rank, First Lieutenant. 
EDWARD S. HAYDEN, Waterbory, Sept. 30, 1878. 

(ajar, 
EVELYN L. BISSELL, New Haven. Feb. 28, 1876. 

-Rank, First Lieutenant. 
GEORGE L. BEARDSLEY, Birmingham, Feb. 8, 1878. 

Inspector of Target Practice — Rank, Captain. 

ANDREW ALLEN, New Haven, Jan. 5. 1880. 

Chaplain. 



Company A 

Rank. ; ink. 

Cap: \ - Waterbury, Feb. 19, 1877. 

\st Lieu I :ank R. Win. Waterbury, 1880. 

hn B. Doherty, Waterbui .• 20, 1880. 

I B. 

Cap: II iven, Aug. 11. 1878. 

1st Lieutenant, William Kaehri 1881. 

2J I 



32 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



Rank. 

Captain, 

1st Lieutenant, 

2d Lieutenant, 



Company C. 



Name. 

Joseph H. Keefe, 
Edward Lynn, 
John Garrity, 



Residence. 
New Haven, 
New Haven, 
New Haven, 



Date of Rank. 
Dec. 20, 1881. 
Dec. 20, 1881. 
Dec. 20, 1881. 



Company D. 



Captain, Luzerne I. Thomas, 

1 st Lieutenant, George Lawrence, 
id Lieutenant, Richard W. Waite, 



New Haven. Jan. 6, 1880. 
New Haven, Jan. 6, 1880. 
New Haven, Jan. 6, 1880. 



Company E. 

Captain, Henry R. Loomis, New Haven, Nov. 4, 1878. 

1st Lieutenant, Samuel A. Downes, New Haven, Mar. 1, 1875. 

2d Lieutenant, Charles W. Bogue, New Haven, Nov. 4, 1878. 



Company F. 

Captain, George S. Arnold, New Haven, July 28, 1879. 

1st Lieutenant, Arthur M. Howarth, New Haven, .Mar. 24, 1879. 

2d Lieutenant, Frank A. Bowman, New Haven, Dec. 1, 1879. 

Company G. 

Captain, Patrick F. Bannon, Waterbury, Aug. 29, 1881. 

1st Lieutenant, James Horigan, Waterbury, Dec. 1, 1880. 

2d Lieutenant, John H. Reid, Waterbury, Aug. 29, 1881. 



Captain, 

1st Lieutenant, 

2d Lieutenant, 



Company H. 



Henry J. Bacon, 
Everett O. Shaler, 
David A. Hutchings, 



Middletown, 
Middletown, 
Middletown, 



Mar. 23, 1880. 
July 29, 1881. 
July 29, 1881. 



Company I. 

Captain, Henry B. Wood, Meriden, April 5, 1877. 

1st Lieutenant, John N. Lane, Meriden, April 5, 1877. 

2d Lieutenant, Frederick T. Ward, Meriden, April 14, 1881, 



Company K. 

Captain, Walter J. Leavenworth, Wallingford, Nov. 11, 1880. 

1st Lieutenant, George G. LaBarnes, Wallingford, Dec. 26, 1878. 

2d Lieutenant, Charles O. Norton, Wallingford, May 8, 1879. 



12.] Al'jr l \\ . \i *S 1:1 P( 'i. I. 



rHIRD REGIMEN r. 

net. 

of Bank. 

wii.i.iam H. TUBBS, New London, Mar. 

/ initenant-Co. 

EDWARD P. KING, Putnam, Mar. I . 1878, 

Ma jar. 

William II. BENTLEY, New London, July 14. 1881. 

titan t — Rank, Captain. 

GEORGE HAVENS, New London, 

Quartern/aster — Rank, First Lieutenant. 
GEORGE W. PHILLIPS, Wiilimantic. Mar. 30, 1878. 

Paymaster — Rank, First Lieutenant. 

JOSEPH W. GILBERT, Norwich, Feb. 14. 1874. 

Surgeon — Rank, Major. 
CHARLES M CARLETON, Norwich, Mar. 30, 1878. 

ton — Rank, First Lieutenant. 
WILLIAM H. YOUNG, Norwich. Oct. 28, 1871. 

Inspector of 7. — Rank, Captain. 

ALONZO W. SHOLES. New London, Mar. 3c 

Chaplain. 
EDWARD W. BACON, N\w London. Mar. 30. 1878. 

Company A. 

Rank. Name. •• of Rank. 

■in. Johh H. Hoxis, Mystic B Feb. 11 1876. 

1st Lieutenant, Hknrv J. HlI.I.. Mystic River, Oct. I, : 

2d Lieutenant, WlLLIAM C. J Mystic River. Oct. I. 1879. 

Company B 

in. w\. Twmmky, Pawcatuck, June - 

van, Pawcatucjc, 18, 1879. 

ieutenaut, Daniii. Kki.khkr. Pawcatuck. 18. 1879. 

5 



34 



ADTUTANT-GENERALS REPORT. 



[Jan., 



Company C. 

Rank. Name. Residence. Date of Rank. 

Captain, William F. Bidwell, Norwich, Nov. 21, 1881. 

1st Lieutenant, Charles S. Ebberts. Norwich, Aug. 2, 1881. 

id Lieutenant, Charles H. Gilbert, Norwich, Aug. 2, 1881. 



Company D. 



Captain, 

1st Lieutenant, 

id Lieutenant, 



Fred'k E. St. Clare, 
William M. Mason. 
William W. Cronin, 



New London, Aug. 1, 1881. 
New London, Aug. 1, 1881. 
New London, Aug. 1, 1881. 



Company E. 

Captain, Frank S. Fowler, 

1st Lieutenant, James Haggerty, 

2d Lieutenant, Alexander L. Fuller, 



Willimantic, July 8, 1881. 
Willimantic, July 8, 1881. 
Willimantic, Aug. 18, 1876. 



Company G. 

Captain, Daniel G. Arnold, Thompson, Dec. 17, 1881. 

1st Lieutenant, George L. Geer, Putnam, Dec. 17, 1881. 

id Lieutenant, Daniel N. Medbury, Putnam, Dec. 17, 1881. 



Company I. 



Captain, Abner N. Sterry, 

1st Lieutenant, J. Emerson Harris, 
id Lieutenant, Charles F. Chaney, 



New London, Feb. 18, 1879. 
New London, Nov. 19, 1878. 
New London, Nov. 9. 1880. 



Company K. 

Captain, Myron P. Squires, Willimantic, Sept. 24, 1880. 

1st Lieutenant, Charles W. Harrington, Willimantic, Aug. 11, 1881. 

id Lieutenant, Carlile P. Boynton, Willimantic, Aug. n, 1881. 



\;. H r\\ l GENER \i 'S Rl P< >R I. 



FOUR in REGIMEN I 

v CBOF1 l. B thel, 1878. 

Lieu 
HENRY SKINNER, Wiost( ia, 1878. 

JAMES C. CROWE, South Nor walk, Aug. 1-. 1880. 

tin. 
DAVID T. HUBBELL, Bethel, 21. 1871. 

— Rank, Fi>st Lieutenant. 
HENRY N. FANTON, Danbury, Feb. 15, 1880. 

Paymaster — Rank, First Lieutenant. 
GEORGE S. RoWE, Winsted, Nov. 2. 1878. 

%eon — Rank, Major, 
GEORGE F. LEWIS. Bridgeport, July 31. 

ton — Ran int. 

WILLIAM <* BURKE, Jr., South Norwalk, May 2-. 1877. 

- ctor of 7 a tain. 

SAMUEL C. KINGMAN, Bridgeport. July 3:. 1876. 

Chaplain. 
SAMUEL SCOVILLE, Stamford, 1881. 

IMP ANY A. 

Rank. . nk. 

tin, ling, 

nt. W11.1.1 wi I". I! bel, 

W. Win i Ehel, May 10, 1881. 

I) 

W 1 11. -t. Jul\ 

: 
2*/ Lieutenant. WlLFRED T. VAN \ Igeport, Juh 



36 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



Company D. 

Rank. Name. Residence. Date of Rank. 

Captain, Edward F. Jennings, So. Norwalk, Sept. 17, 1880. 

\st Lieutenant, Alvan A. Hauschildt, So. Norwalk. Sept. 17, 1880. 

id Lieutenant, William F. Wardwell, Norwalk, Apr. . 15, 1881. 



Company E. 



Captain, James Sheridan, 

1st Lieutenant, James Donnelly, 
id Lieutenant, John J. Glennon, 



Bridgeport, 
Bridgeport, 
Bridgeport, 



Dec. 31, 1880. 
Dec. 31, 1880. 
Mar. 25, 1881. 



Company F. 

Captain, Addison A. Betts, Norwalk, 

1st Lieutenant, Ferdinand B. Smith, Norwalk. 

id Lieutenant, Harvey M. Kent, Norwalk, 



May 4, 1880. 
May 4, 1880. 
July 15, 1881. 



Captain, 

1st Lieutenant, 

id Lieutenant, 



Company G. 



George C. Comes, 
George A. Vibbert, 
Cornelius Delury, 



Danbury, 
Danbury, 
Danbury, 



Jan. 14, 187S. 
April 8, 1878. 
Jan. 12, 1880, 



Company I. 

Captain, Edward Finn, • Winsted, May 20, 1881, 

1st Lieutenant, William B. Phillips, Winsted, Aug. 29, 1881, 

id Lieutenant, Alfred E. Moore, Winsted, Aug. 29, 1881. 



Company K. 

Captain, Henry M. Blakeslee, Stratford, Nov. 18, 1878. 

1st Lieutenant, Charles Wilcoxson, Stratford, Nov. 18, 1878. 

id Lieutenant, James W. Scofield, Stratford, . Nov. 18, 1878. 



2.] AMI l.\\ r-GI M RA1 'S R] l ■■ >R l. 

FIFTH BA l I Al.lo.N fCoLOW d). 

Hal. 

FRANK M. WELCH, Bridgeport, n, 1881, 

:.' — h'link. Captain 
JAMES 0. J< >N Haven, Sept. 15. 1881. 

•<■■.»•/ lieutenant. 
wili.iam P. II. cross, Hartford, Sept. 15, 1881. 

rsi Lieutenant. 
COURTLANDT V. R. CREED, New Haven, Dec. 20 1-;, 

Company A. 

\ 1 Hi.-. Bed Date of Bank. 

tain, W. Ladii New Haven, April 26, 1881. 

mnt, William R, Key] New Haven, April 26, 1881. 

ufenant, Fl 1 C. Anthony, New I Liven, April 26, 1881. 

Company B. 

tin, Lloyd G. Seymour, Hartford, May 21, 1879. 

lit Lieutenant, L. I - VMOUR, Hartford, Dec. 19, 1881. 

2d [.untenant, John JONES, Hartford, Dec. 19, 1881. 

•mpany C. 

lain, William H. Latimer, Bridgeport, Aug. 29, 1881. 

lieutenant^ R Bridgeport, Sept. 25, 1879. 

2</ Lieutenant, l H. Walker, Bridgeport, Aug. 29, 1881. 



< 



JUDGE ADVOCAT! 

Data Of Hank. 

THOMAS M< M VNUS, Hartford, July 1; 

' ict. 
M >* II LYNDE HARRIson, New Hs • 1 

xentai /)ist> . 
JOHN A. TIBB1 June 1. 1881. 

MUEL FESSEND1 Aug. 30, 1872. 



<! 



38 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 
[2] 



[Jan., 



ABSTRACT OF MUSTER ROLLS, NOVEMBER, 1881. 

First Regiment. 







PRESENT. 


ABSENT. 


AGGREGATE 




6 

c ■ 
f> 


(A 

is 



USE 

io 












c 

<5 










LOCALITY. 


Cfl CJ 

11 


c 
- 

'So 

3 


C/3 

<y 
"3 

> 


15 



c/5 

u 
O 

5E 


•X3 
U 

C 


Is 



l88l. 


1880. 









£ 


S 


Ph 


H 


O 


W 


H 






Field, Staff 






















and Band, Hartford, 

Company A, Hartford, 




h 


19 

I 




35 
54 








35 
57 


35 
66 


3 


IO 


40 





3 


3 


Company B, Hartford, 


3 


12 


I 


42 


58 





7 


7 


65 


59 


Company D, New Britain,. 


3 


5 


2 


46 


56 





4 


4 


60 


69 


Company E, New Britain,. 


2 


11 


2 


43 


5« 





4 


4 


62 


66 


Company F, Hartford, — 


1 


13 


2 


44 


60 





2 


2 


62 


66 


Company G, S. Manchester 


3 


8 


I 


34 


46 





10 


10 


56 


61 


Company H, Hartford, 


3 


8 


2 


36 


49 





5 


5 


54 


63 


Company K, 


Hartford, 


3 


11 


"- 


49 


63 


.... 


1 


1 


04 


78 


Total 




3. 


84 


30 


334 


479 





36 


36 


5i* 


676 






. 



Companies C and I have been disbanded since muster of 1880. 
Per cent, present, 93.01 ; gain over 1880, 10 per cent. 



Second Regiment 







LOCALITY. 


PRESENT. 


ABSENT. 


AGGREGATE 




-f '- 




<yj 








c 




















O 

'en 

3 


<u 

> 


O 


■X. 

U 

O 

£ 








1881. 


1880. 








u 


'A 


^ 


Ph 


H 


O 


W 


H 






Field, Sta 


ff 
























and Band, 


Middletown, _ 


9 


3 


19 





3i 


I 


2 


3 


34 


15 


Company 


A, 


Waterbury, .. 


3 


11 


I 


40 


55 




5 


5 


60 


63 


Company 


B. 


New Haven, _ 


3 


12 


2 


29 


46 





4 


4 


5o 


61 


Company 


c, 


New Haven, . 


2 


12 


2 


31 


47 





9 


9 


56 


63 


Company 


D. 


New Haven, _ 


3 


8 


2 


35 


48 





12 


12 


60 


56 


Company 


E, 


New Haven, _ 


3 


10 





33 


4b 





7 


7 


53 


61 


Company 


F. 


New Haven, _ 


3 


12 


2 


33 


5o 


_ _. 


4 


4 


54 


57 


Company 
Company 


G 


Waterbury, __ 
Middletown, _ 


3 
3 


13 
11 


2 


38 
24 


56 
39 








56 

5o 


64 
60 


H, 


I 





11 


11 


Company 


I, 


Meriden, 


3 


10 


I 


42 


56 





5 


5 


61 


66 


Company 


K, 


Wallingford, _ 


3 


11 


I 


33 


48 





5 


5 


53 


51 


Total, . 






38 


113 


33 


338 


522 


I 


64 


65 


587 


617 









Per cent, present, 88.92 ; gain over 1880, 8.92 per cent. 






AMI' I W It- 1 M R \I - Rl I ■• >K I . 






( 



Third Regimi n i . 



























d 


























































c 












































- 






"= 












- 




*- 
















Field. - 














Band, 


■ 






[< 1 

















i:iv A. 




1 


I I 






31 








; < 




inv B, 


nick. . 






J 

















.'.I1V ('. 


i). 


2 


[0 


a 


3i 







1 1 


1 1 






iny D, 


■ 


3 


1 1 


i 


25 







1 1 


1 1 




5B 


Company E, 


Willimantic, - 


3 


IJ 


i 


30 


46 





[0 


10 


56 


68 


l!)\ G, 


Putnam, - 


2 


io 


i 


17 


30 


1 


*7 


2g 


58 




tin I. 


London, 


- 


12 


i 


22 


37 


1 


i'. 


1: 






iny K. 


Willimantic,. 


I 


u 


2 


»9 


34 


2 


14 


16 


50 


55 








06 




183 




6 


[28 




468 





Companies F an 1 H hive been disbanded since muster <«t 1880. 
; - 7 1 36 ; gain over 18S0. 12.36 per cent. 



ForkTii Ri GIM] n 1 . 





LOCALITY. 




ABS1 


i <;ate 




- 

'= = 

BC 

a 

3 
3 
3 

I 

3 
3 
3 


c - 
Z 

5 

12 

8 
1 1 


3 s 


3 

- 


- 


d 

- 

s 

— 
E 

M 

B 

- 

I 

14 

< ; 
28 

'3 


14 


1881. 


1880. 


Field. - 

and 
Company A, 
Companv B, 
Company 1). 
Company E. 
Companv F, 
Comp .1 ■ 

my K. 

•! 


Bethel. 
Bethel, 

Bridgeport... 
walk, . 

Rridg- 

■ik, . . . 
Danbury. .... 

■ 

"1 




2 

1 
1 

2 
2 

1 


23 
21 





I have bee • r of 1880. 

Per cent, presen 



I 



40 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



[Jan., 





Fifth Battalion 


(Colored 


)• 












LOCALITY. 


PRESENT. 


ABSENT. 


AGGREGATE 




a . 

.2 OT 

'35 Sri 


Sj2 


G 








c 
















5 
'0 
'55 


a 
> 


15 


in 
U 

is 




"3 


1881. 


1880. 






o 










c 












O 


3 
13 


& 


(X 


• H 



1 


H 


H 






Field & Staff 




3 
3 






6 




1 


7 
60 


7 
61 


Company A, 


New Haven, _ 


2 


37 


55 




5 


5 


Cempany B, 


Hartford, 


2 


ii 


2 


33 


48 


1 


io' 


11 


59 


69 


Company C, 


Bridgeport,.. 


3 


13 


2 


30 


48 


---- 


2 

17 


2 


50 


62 


Total, 


1 1 


40 


6 


100 


157 


2 


19 


176 


258 







Company D has been disbanded since muster of 1880. 
Per cent, present, 89.20; gain over 1880, 21.20 per cent. 





B 


VTTERY A 


, Artillery. 
















PRESENT. 


ABSENT. 


AGGREGATE 




T3 




































c 














r/5 










OJ 




































S fc 




















LOCALITY. 


m v 






















pB 


OS 


'5 


V 






u 




1881. 


1880. 






no 


gO 


'55 


rt 




S 


■2 

















•j3 


O 


£ 


c 


c 













£ 


& 


(X 


H 


O 


W 


H 






1st Platoon,. 


Guilford, 


2 


8 


I 


21 


32 


.-.. 


4 


4 


36 


39 


2d Platoon,. 


Clinton, 


2 


5 


---- 


15 


22 





17 


17 


39 


35 


Total, 




4 


13 


I 


36 


54 


--- 


21 


21 


75 


74 









Per cent, present, 72 ; gain over 1880, 4 per cent. 



Recapitulation. 





LOCALITY. 


PRESENT. 


ABSENT. 


AGGREGATE 


BRIGADE C. N. G. 


O 

§ s 
■gffl 


in 

S jo 

Sk 


cO 



in 
eS 
'0 

'55 

3 


B3 


13 


in 




a 

■a 
.52 


"3 




1881. 


1880. 









£ 


O 


~ 


h 


O 


w 


H 






Brig. General 
























and Staff,. 
1st Regiment 




8 


2 






10 








IO 


8 


1st Cong. Dis. 


3i 


84 


30 


334 


479 





36 


36 


515 


b7b 


2d Regiment 


2d Cong. Dis. 


38 


ri3 


33 


338 


522 


1 


b 4 


b5 


587 


617 


3d Regiment 


3d Cong. Dis. 


27 


96 


22 


189 


334 


b 


128 


134 


4b 8 


640 


4thR< j gimeni 


4th Cong. Dis. 


34 


93 


30 


233 


390 





1*3 


113 


503 


641 


5th Battalion 


State at Large 


11 


40 


6 


100 


157 


2 


17 


19 


17b 


258 


Artillery, — 


2d Cong. Dis. 


4 


13 


1 


3b 


54 





21 


21 


75 


74 


Total, 




153 


441 


122 


1230 


1946 


9 


379 


388 


2334 


2QI4 









Per cent, present for Brigade, 83.37 ; gain over 1880, 10.37 per cent. 






M'll I \\ l-i.l M l; A I - l:l P< 'l; I . 

r 3 1 



1< 



< 



Tabu cm Enlistmsn i 1 N br, 1880, to 

M j \ Ml I . i B8i. 









- 



< 






{MUMjIUUX 






" 



•i 

- 






inrti^KI 






©l pau»jfuuj. 





















-".a | |: 


















i 



■ 















I u*p ««".< 






- 



i • 












- 




































- 

- 



a 9 c h 



I E. 















(! 



[4] 



Consolidated Morning Report of the Second, Third and Fourth 
at Camp " Bigelow," Niantic, Monday, Sept. 5, 



Sept. 5. 

2d Reg't 

3d Reg't. ... 
4th Reg't. -. 
1st Plat. Art. 
2d Plat. Art. 



PRESENT. 



FOR DUTY. 



2 7 

3! 6 



Total 1st day 8 20 15 24 56 129 1 



9 20 



343 
247 
292 

23 

26 



113 931 1,484 



544 

413 

457 

34 

36 



5 8 



DETAILED. 



Total 
present. 



6\ 91 1,501 



Sept. 6. 
2d Reg't. ._- 
3d Reg't. _.. 
4th Reg't. .. 
1st Plat. Art 
2d Plat. Art 

Total 2d day 



2 


7 


5 


9 


20 


48 


70 


40 


34i 


542 








3 




6 


9 
















3 


7 


5 


7 


ib 


3 b 


54 


3 b 


240 


404 








2 


1 




3 








4 




20 


24 


3 


6 


5 


8 


16 

2 
2 


38 
3 
3 


53 
5 
4 


35 
1 
i 


292 
23 
27 


456 
34 
37 








2 




3 


5 
















8 


20 


15 


24 


56 


128 


186 


113 


923 


1.473 








7 


1 


9 


17 








4 




20 


24 



Sept. 7. 
2d Reg't. _-. 
3d Reg't. __. 
4th Reg't. _. 
1st Plat. Art. 
2d Plat. Art. 

Total 3d day. 



2 


7 


5 


9 


20 


48 


70 


40 


335 


536 








3 




7 


10 
















3 


7 


5 


7 


ib 


3 b 


52 


3 b 


240 


402 








1 


1 




2 








5 




IS 


23 


3 


b 


5 


8 


ib 

2 


37 
3 


53 
5 


35 

1 


290 

23 


453 
34 








3 




2 


5 
























2 


3 


4 


1 


27 


37 






























8 


20 


15 


24 


56 


127 


184 


113 


915 


1.462 








7 


1 


9 


17 








5 




18 


23 



Sept. 8. 
2d Reg't. __- 
3d Reg't. ... 
4th Reg't. -- 
tsI Plat. Art. 
2d Plat. Art. 

Total 4th day 



2 


7 


5 


8 


19 


45 


65 


39 


304 


494 






1 


c. 


! 


12 


19 






1 


5 




20 


26 


3 


7 


b 


7 


16 


33 


46 


35 


217 


370 








7 


I 


23 


3i 






1 


b 




21 


28 


3 


b 


5 


8 


ib 
2 


38 
3 


5i 

5 


34 
1 


288 
23 


449 
34 








2 




5 


7 
















8 


20 


ib 


23 


2 

55 


3 
122 


4 
171 


1 
no 


28 

8 bo 


38 






1 


14 


2 


_ 

40 


57 






2 


11 




4i 


54 


1.385 



Sept. 9. 
2d Reg't. — 


■ 


7 


5 


b 


17 


44 


65 


40 


295 


481 


1 




j 


4 




b 


„ 






3 


9 




33 


1 
45 


3dReg't. __- 


3 


7 


b 


8 


ib 


34 


53 


36 


231 


394 








2 


1 


7 


10 








4 




20 


24 


4th Reg't. _. 


3 


b 


5 


8 


tb 


37 


57 


34 


285 


445 








I 




4 


5 
















1st Plat. Art. 










2 


3 


5 


1 


23 


34 






























2d Plat. Art. 










2 


3 


4 


1 


28 


38 






























Total 5th day 


8 


20 


16 


22 


53 


121 


178 


112 


802 


1.392 






1 


7 


1 


17 


26 




• 


3 


13 




53 


b 9 



Sept. 10. 
2d Reg't. .-. 


. 


7 


5 


b 


17 


44 


65 


40 


295 


481 






. 


4 




6 


n 






3 


9 




33 


45 


3d Reg't. _.. 


3 


7 


b 


8 


16 


34 


53 


36 


231 


394 








2 


1 


7 


10 








4 




20 


24 


4th Reg't. -. 


3 


b 


5 


8 


16 


37 


57 


34 


285 


445 








1 




4 


5 
















1st Plat. Art. 










2 


3 


5 


1 


23 


34 






























2d Plat. Art. 










2 


3 


4 


1 


28 


38 






























Total bth day 


8 


20 


« 


22 


53 


121 


178 


112 


8b2 


1.392 






1 


7 


1 


17 


2b 






3 


13 




53 


69 






Regiments Infantry, and mi Am ncui Nation G 

TO S\l I : I S8l. 



AIWN 1 


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as 


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17 






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548 


588 




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46 


69 


33 


390 


1 




34 


458 


4Q2 




3d R- 


I 






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15 32 












33 


23 


45 


33 


424 


1 


44 


34 




502 




4th R 












4 


4 
















5 


2 


32 




; 


2 


39 
















a 














• 


1 


3 


2 


34 




3 


2 


37 




2d Plat. Art. 


a 


i a 


u 




4^ 


- 








- 




•M 


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_ 4 


•54 


1 1 1 


1,548 1.660 




Total 



I 



I 




,4 














17 








513 


2 




40 




58S 




1 I 4 




29 








4 








61 


33 


398 


1 


60 


34 






I 


3 


II 


15 












23 


2 3 


3S 


33 




1 


37 


34 


465 








4 


4 












I 


I 


5 


2 


32 




5 


2 


37 


39 






_ 


2 
















2 


2 


35 




2 


2 


37 


39 




I 2 8 


54 


"7 








" 




69 


7'- 


143 


to8 


1.406 


4 


'39 


112 


1.545 





588 2 

492 ; 

502 4th R' 

39 1st Plat. Ait. 

39 2d Plat. Art. 



a 1 29 






7i 79 



156 



3S 

33 

33 

2 

2 

108 



508 
394 
425 

32 
35 



1.394 



2 40 

I '4 
I 41 

_i 

4 1 = 2 









54a 


588 




458 






466 


500 




37 


39 


tt. A it. 


37 


39 


39 2d Plat. Art. 


.546 




[,657 Total 3d day. 






3 


, 


19 


4^ 




6 




63 


34 




2424 


43 






1 1 


5 


2 








1 
160 


2 
109 


9 


<>1 





501 

395 

423 

32 

36 



1.387 



46 
63 

4- 
5 
I 



1 12 



37 



587 
39 



588 adRi g't. 

500 4th R 
39 2d Plat. Art. 



I .: 4th d. 

















1 1 1 










I 




3 1 












23 26 


36 




4 4" 








-"-- 








" 




34 41 








4 


[923 


















I 




7 














*3 


23 




417 


1 r 




469 






4th R 








4 4 












1 


1 


5 


32 


- 


2 


37 














1 1 
















1 




1 




37 




39 


I .-»rt. 


a 








7 




i' 1 




5 164 


1 1 a 


1.544 






Total --■ 



I 



» 


I 




















1 














- 










4 






















I 


- 












1 1 




33 

2 


32 


1 










4th K 




















36 




1 


2 


37 






2 3 


■ 










7 






107 


1.380 


5 




1 12 






th day 



44 ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 

Consolidated Morning Report of the First Regiment, 
at yorktown centennial celebration, 



[Jan., 



DATE. 


PRESENT. 




FOR DUTY. 


SICK. 


DETAILED. 


Total 
present. 








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Monday, Oct. 17 


Tuesday, Oct. 18 


3 


7 


5 


8 


16 


34 


40 


3.3 


307 


462 






























462 


Wednesday, Oct. 19. 


3 


7 


5 


S 


16 


34 


40 


33 


307 


462 






























462 


Thursday, Oct. 20 _ . 


3 


7 


5 


& 


16 


34 


4<) 


33 


307 


462 






























462 


Friday, Oct. 21 


3 


7 


5 


6 


15 


32 


46 


33 


301 


44S 






























448 


Saturday, Oct. 22.. 


3 


6 


5 


6 


is 


32 


46 


33 


301 


447 






























447 


Sunday, Oct. 23 


3 


6 


5 


s 


1633 


48 


33 


303 


455: 






























455 



Consolidated Morning Report of the Fifth Battalion 
Field Day, Charter Oak Park, 



DATE. 








PRESENT. 




FOR DUTY. 


SICK. 


DETAILED. 


Total, 
present. 








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Tuesday, Sept. 20. 


171 



1 882.] 



ADJl I W f-GENl i: O/S Rl PORT 



45 



I 



lEcncui Nationai Guard, Sevrn i > \> ' Spbciaj Duty, 

iBBB i- i i S8l. 



IBSEN l 






RE< \l'l 11 I \ 



DATE 






WITH 



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I 5165 










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1 5573 






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1 42S 

69 34 438 

69 34 438 

B3 ;i 4>7 

B4 30 417 

) 422 



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• 197 

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53i 53i 

53i S3' 

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.. Monday, 

IK day, I 

. 7 'hif 
Sun 



(Coi." \ lTIOnal Guard, Fall Parade and 

Hartford, Si 1S81. 



IBSEN 1 




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with : 






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46 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 



[5] 

Report of Capt. McCrea, First U. S. Artillery, of 
Muster and Inspection in May, 1881. 



Fort Trumbull Conn., ) 
June 5, 1881. } 

Adjutant-General, State of Connecticut, Hartford, Conn., 

Sir: — In compliance with Special Orders No. 74, C. S., 
from headquarters Department of the East, aud General 
Orders No. 4, C S., from vour office, I have the honor to 
submit the following report of the muster and inspection 
of the National Guard of the State of Connecticut, during 
the month of May : 

First Regiment. — Every officer was present at muster, 
and only twenty enlisted men were absent — one half be- 
ing from one company. Three companies had out every 
man, and four others had but one absentee each. This 
excellent showing is the natural result of the harmonious 
working of the field, staff, and line officers. All seemed 
to be working together for the common good, and for the 
advancement of their Regiment to the first place in the 
National Guard. Three companies of this Regiment are 
excellent, — decidedly the best in the State, — three are 
very good, two are good and two are bad. These last (C 
and 1) are a dead weight upon this otherwise fine regi- 
ment, and its efficiency would be greatly increased if 
these companies were eliminated. The drill of three 
companies (B, F, and K) was a surprise, it was so thor- 
ough. The execution of the manual by Co. B was equal 
to any that I had ever seen. 

In the care and condition of arms and accoutrements 
this regiment did not do itself credit ; and it was sur- 
prising that companies that were so well up in all other 
respects should make such a poor showing in this. 



[882.] ami i w r-Gl M R \l 'S Rl P< 'l; I. 

This regiment excelled in the condition <>t its records ; 
the hooks and papers oi companies B, F, and l\ are mod 
els oi accuracy and neatness. 

md Regiment. Two companies ol this regimen! are 
excellent, three are very good, and five are good. There 
is not a poor company In it. It particularly excelled in 
the care of arms and accoutrements. A per centage oi 
94.39 of the total strength was present for muster. But 

three officers and t w ent \ -ei g lit men were absent. 

Third Regiment, — Although this regiment had fewer 

men upon its rolls than either of the others, vet it had 

one hundred and twenty-seven officers and men absent — 
nearly as many as the other three regiments combined. 

One company alone had more absentees than the ten com- 
panies of the First Regiment. The best company in this 
regiment is inferior to the worst in the Second. Two are 
fair; the others are poor, one being decidedly bad. At- 
tendance, discipline, and instruction were generally poor. 
There seemed to be a lack of interest exhibited by the 
officers and men not observable in any other regiment. 

Fourth Regiment. — This regiment has two companies 

that are excellent, — among the best in the State, — two 
others are good, two others are fair, two are poor, and 

one bad — decidedly bad. 

Fifth Battalion. — This organization is not a credit to 
the National Guard. The officers, with the exception of 
the captain of C\>. A. are deficient in knowledge of their 
duties and drill. The discipline is poor and instruc- 
tion bad. It excelled in the care ot its uniforms, and failed 
in care of quarters and attention to its company records. 
Company A presented a fine appearance, and with its 
present captain will make a good company. Company 
I)i^ utterly unreliable: no discipline no instruction 
nothing to recommend it. 

This command is remarkably good when 
the disadvantages under which they tabor are taken into 
consideration. A battery that is | : .at twice .1 yeai 



i 



( 



48 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

cannot be expected to excel in drill, yet both platoons 
did well. There is a lack of discipline in the second 
platoon. 

The greatest deficiency in the National Guard is the 
lack of discipline in many of the companies. It is no 
doubt difficult to assemble together men who meet daily 
on a social equality, and make them change the citizen 
into the soldier for one day in the week, but such defects 
as talking, gazing about, chewing tobacco, and spitting 
in the ranks could be, and should be corrected. 

Another deficiency is the want of knowledge of many 
of the officers, particularly a knowledge of tactics. I 
recommend that schools for officers and non-commis- 
sioned officers be established in every company, with 
weekly recitations ; that short and easily-learned lessons 
be given ; that each officer and non-commissioned officer 
be required to learn every lesson thoroughly, word for 
word, as given in the tactics ; that each should be marked 
for his recitation, according to its value ; and that each 
captain be required to render monthly reports of recita- 
tions to the regimental commander. A regimental order, 
giving the monthly standing of the different companies in 
the regiment, would perhaps stimulate competition and 
be of benefit. 

Officers never had finer material to work with than the 
officers of the National Guard. It is composed of a re- 
markably fine lot of young men — intelligent'and quick to 
receive instruction. Wherever there is any deficiency in 
a company, it is directly traceable to want of capacity in 
the officers, either to ignorance or indifference — generally 
the former. I recommend that the attention of officers 
be directed to paragraph IX, Upton's Tactics, relating to 
commands. Most of the officers do not require this, but 
some do, and there is a lack of uniformity in the different 
regiments. It is very certain that if a command is given 
without animation and snap, it will be executed in the 
same way. A command to a soldier needs to be given as 
a command, not as a request. 

With the exception of the Second Regiment and a few 



[882 AMI I'W I-.. I \l RA1 'S Rl P< -I: I. 

companies in the other regiments, the care and condition 
of arms and accoutrements was not what it should have 
been. The system of having an armorer to each com- 
pany, to care for the arms, and relieving each man from 
visibility for the condition of his particular rifle, I do 

not think a good one-. I low to take- (arc ot liis rifle i^ a 

necessary pari of the education ot a soldier, and it his 
company was called into active- service, he would not 
know how to keep his rifle serviceable, and the armorer 

Could not take care ()( all. 

I recommend that, in addition to the supervision ot the 
armorer, each man be directed to look alter his own rifle. 
and be encouraged in taking pride in keeping it clean. 
The objection given to this is, that the men cannot get 
time to clean their rifles. The answer is, that what the 
Second Regiment can do the others can do. 

It is recommended that Companies C and I, First Reg- 
iment, Company F, Third Regiment, Company C, Fourth 
iment, and Company D, Fifth Battalion, be disban- 
ded. 

I have the honor to transmit herewith a detailed report 
of the muster and inspection, and the muster rolls in du- 
plicate of forty-two companies of infantry, and two pla- 
toons of artillery. 

Very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

TULLY McCREA, 

Captain First Artillery, and Brevet Major U. S. Army. 



tction on the report of Major McCrea, see General Orders, 
A. (i. <)., June 20, 1881, page 88 of this repent. 



50 



adjutant-general's report. 



[Jan., 



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52 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



[Jan. 





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54 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



[Jan., 





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Ahjr i \\ i GEN1 R \i 'S R1 P< >R i. ;; 



Report of Colonel II. !>. Clitz, Tenth U.S. Infantry, 
of Inspection at Camp. 



i 



Fori W w \i . Mk i i i < . \n, / 
October 28, 1S81. 

utant- General, United States Army ^ Washington, D. C. 

[Through Headquarters, Department ol the K. 

General : 

In obedience to Special Orders, No. 139, Head- 
quarters Department of the Bast, August 10, [88l, I 

reached New London, Conn., Sept. 4th. I there learned 
that the National Guard of that State would only reach 
camp the next day, Monday, and would all take part in 
the ceremonies in and around Fort Griswold, on Groton 
Heights, opposite New London, on 'Tuesday. 

I therefore remained to witness those ceremonies and 
only reached the camp at Niantic early on Wednesday. 
I was cordially and hospitably received and entertained 
by Gov. Bigelow and Staff, and every opportunity was 
given me to witness the drills, duties and ceremonies 
connected with the encampment, where I remained until 
the afternoon of Saturday, Sept. 9th, when it broke- up. 

There were present in camp the 2d, 3d and 4th regi- 
ments ol infantry, and two platoons ot artillery ; their 
strength is given in the consolidated morning report of 
the 9th Sept., enclosed. 

The 1st regiment was not in camp, as it was engaged 
in making preparations to be present at the celebration at 
Yoi ktown. 

Since my return from the latter place 1 have read the 

report of Col. Rogei Jones, Assistant Inspector-General, 

who was present at the encampment of [880. His report 
is' so carefully prepared, the points he makes and the 
views he expresses in it coincide so exactly with my 
own, if I should go into details it would simply 



( 



56 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

repetition of his report. Neither have I anything to add 
to his suggestions. 

I must say, however, in conclusion, although I knew 
something of the reputation of the Connecticut National 
Guard, I was most agreeably surprised to find at Niantic 
such a well-laid and cleanly kept encampment, troops so 
well organized and drilled, and officers so well instructed 
in their duties. 

I only caught a glimpse of the ist Connecticut regi- 
ment as it joined the rear of the column in the " march 
past" before the President on the military day at York- 
town, but I will venture to say its fine military appear- 
ance was unsurpassed by any state organization present. 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

HENRY B. CL1TZ, 

Colonel ioth Infantry. 

[endorsement on the above.] 

Official copy, respectfully furnished for the information of the Governor 
of Connecticut. 

R. C. DRUM, 

Adjutant-General. 

Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, Nov. 4, 1881. 



Al»!l fANT-GENERAl 'S Rl I 



Report of Brigade Inspector of Target Practice 






i 



Brig idi Hi uxji irters, C. N. G ) 

Ni.w Haven, November 15, 1881. * 

Bti M. Harmon, 

nnecticut. 

Ol NERAL : 

In compliance with General Orders No. 7, A. («. O. 
June 1. 1SS1. 1 have the honor to submit my report ol 
target practice in the brigade for the year [881, together 
with list of those who have qualified as sharpshooters 
and marksmen. 

I regret that the report does not compare more favor- 
ably with those of preceding years, the general result 
showing less number as having passed successfullv to 
the rank of marksmen, and a less number of companies 
that have carried out the system of classification. 

The greater part of this deficiency is owing to lack of 
range accommodations, some of the best companies hav- 
ing been without any range for practice, and many being 
accommodated only bv personal or company expense I 
think the practical benefit of this branch of military drill 
is so generally acknowledged that the State should not 
hesitate to furnish the necessarv facilities for the carry- 
ing out ol the system adopted and in accordance with 
orders issued, especially as the amount required is SO 
small: and I would respectfully recommend that the entire 
supervision as 1 dishing and furnishing rifle rai 

be placed in the hands of the Brigade Inspector ol Target 
Practice, who should secure compensation tor actual time 
and expense- when on this duty. Me could be limited in 
amount to be expended either bv amount total, or in 
amount allowed for each company. 

I would make favorable mention ot the plan ol the 
Spring parade being devoted to classification. It will 



(< 



58 • adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

certainly do much towards enlisting interest of the offi- 
cers and men. The results of last spring's trial was not 
very satisfactory, as the inspection ordered the same day 
very seriously interfered with its workings. The com- 
pleteness of report and result, as shown from the ist 
regiment, is worthy of a complimentary notice, and 
while it shows a loss in number of marksmen, it must be 
remembered it has had two (2) companies disbanded, and 
two (2) other companies that have not been provided 
with a range ; still the report shows that when the 
system, now adopted, is carried out faithfully and ear- 
nestly, it will certainly produce the most favorable 
results. 

I include in this report some statistics from the third 
annual prize meeting held at Quinnipiac Range, Novem- 
ber 3d. Owing to the many other military events there 
was not as much interest in this meeting as had pre- 
viously been shown, and but a small amount could be 
collected to offer as prizes. It was thought best to main- 
tain 'the meetings as they had proven both of interest 
and benefit. The attendance this year (under the cir- 
cumstances) was quite as good as was expected, while 
the scores compare favorably with previous years. 

The following statistics of the fall meeting are given 
herewith : 

INDIVIDUAL MATCH. 

This match was open to any member of the Con- 
necticut National Guard ; distance 200 yards, rounds 
seven, position standing; there were sixty-nine entries in 
this list, with fifteen prizes, valued at $100.00. The first 
prize was won by Lieut. John N. Lane, Company I, 2d 
Regiment, on a score of 30 points. All prizes were 
won on scores of 80 per cent, or better. 

COMPANY TEAM MATCH. 

Conditions: Teams of eight men from any company in 
the Connecticut National Guard; rounds seven, at each 
200 and 500 yards; possible score, 560. Fifteen teams 
entered ; twelve teams shot ; totals, as follows : 






\hir rANT-GENER \1 S RJ P< >R I , 









cm k . id Regiment 
Company A 
Com pan) K, 41I1 
Com] any B, 4th 
Company H, 2d 
Company 1. I I 
Company < '. sd 
Company I. 4th 
Company I. ; I 
Company I). 4th 

G H .11.11!. 

Compiinv G, [si Regiment 















201 


404 








193 


|| - 




175 

163 

173 

1 Jl 


133 


188 


.-1 


I Fnfiniahed. 
1 rnfinished. 



[MEN 1 A 1 TEAM MATCH. 



Conditions: Twelve men, ten shots each at 200 and 500 

Is. 
lint two teams entered. 



8D REGIM] \ l . 









1 1 Atkinson, — 
John N Lane 

William H. Talcott.. 
Henrt J. B 

!. 1 Bai nes, 

..... 
rt M. Walker, 

Andrew Allen, 

Frank K. White 

: ick L. W 



. 






Private, . . K . 

tst Lieut., -. I, 

t. - H, 

K, 

H, 

1 51 Lieut.. . K. 

Pi ivate, ... K. 

Sergt I 

ist Lieut., . A. 

.. II. 

Private, .. K, 



300 
"> arde. 



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43 
39 
37 

39 
40 

37 
39 
38 
37 



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38 
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42 
4i 
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38 
37 
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32 
80 



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78 

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71 
74 




465 




897 



60 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

The list of sharpshooters and marksmen for the year 
1881, and their scores, is appended hereto. I would re- 
spectfully urge that the badges they are now entitled 
to, be issued as soon as the department can procure them. 

I have the honor to be, General, 

Your obedient servant, 

JAMES E. STETSON, 

Major and Brigade Inspector Target Practice C. N. G. 



Note. — The list of sharpshooters and marksmen for 188 1 will be published 
in General Orders. » 



Report of Examining Board. 



" Camp Bigelow," Niantic, Conn., ) 
September 9, 1881. f 

Brigadier-General George M. Harmon, 

A djtttant- General, Slate of Connecticut. 

Sir : In compliance with General Orders No. 10, dated 
Adjutant-General's office, Hartford, August 23, 1881, we, 
the members of the Board thereby appointed, convened 
at this encampment on Wednesday, September 7, 1881, 
and proceeded to examine the officers ordered to ap- 
pear before us. 

As the result of a careful and thorough examination 
upon the tactics, we report the following named officers 
to be qualified therein for the proper performance of their 
duties: 



iSS_\] Al'in an r-Gl M R \l 'S REP< >R i. 6l 

M) p] V lor N 41 III ■ 

I ~ 1 1 — t Lieutenant H<>i comb \. I 

:ond Lieutenant Reuben 11. W. Kblsi 

MRS! REGIMENT. 

< laptain 1 1 \. Corneu . 

First Lieutenant Henri Simon, Ja. 

S »nd Lieutenant Wiuiwi E. Aiuv 
iND REGIMENT. 

liajoi Ch uu as R. Bani 

Captain and Adjutant JOSEPH T. El liott. 
First Lieutenant EVBBETI O. SHALER. 
First Lieutenant Willi wt KaBRRLE. 
Second Lieutenant PATRICK F. BANNON. 
Second Lieutenant FrbdebicB 1. Ward. 
Second Lieutenant DAVID A. EiUTCHINGS. 
Second Lieutenant John Gn r. 

THIRD RBGIM] 

Major William H. Uv\ 1 1 rv. 
Captain MYRON P. 
Captain Frederick E. St. Clare. 
First Lieutenant DaKIEI G. Ak\ 
First Lieutenant J AMES HAGGERTY. 
First Lieutenant Ch S. Ehberts. 

First Lieutenant CHARLES W, Harringto 
Second Lieutenant CHARLBS F. Chaney. 
Second Lieutenant Willi wt W. CroNIN. 
Second Lieutenant CHARLES H. GILBERT. 
Second Lieutenant CAROLE P. BOYNTON. 

FOURTH REGIM 

Major Jambs C. Crowe, 

Captain Edward F. JennIN 
tain J wn-.s Sjd RID w 

tin Edward Finn. 
Fir<i Lieu ten i \ 1 1 schildt. 

Fir<t Lieutenant ' >m i i \ . 

Seen' 

Second Lieutenant WILLIAM 1 '■'• :i. 

iv If. Kim. 

UK II! I: \ I I A! !«»\. 

First Lieutenant William R Ki 
Second Lieutenant Fleetwood C. A- 



62 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

The following named officers failed to pass satisfacto- 
rily, but under such circumstances that we deem it just 
to recommend that they be allowed a further examination 
before final action upon their appointments : 

THIRD REGIMENT. 

Captain William F. Bidwell. 

Captain Selwin E. Rowe. 

Captain Frank S. Fowler. 

First Lieutenant William M. Mason. 

FOURTH REGIMENT. 

Second Lieutenant George W. Wheeler. 

FIFTH BATTALION. 

Captain George W. Ladieu. 

The following- named officers failed to appear for ex- 
amination : 

Major Frank M. Welch, Fifth Battalion. 

First Lieutenant James Horigan, Second Regiment. 

Second Lieutenant John W. Crane, First Regiment. 



In the examination upon the tactics, those officers who 
passed satisfactorily, showed that they had made a careful 
study of them in theory, and that they were for the most 
part well able to put them into practice ; the most no- 
ticeable defect being: a lack of tactical exactness in giving; 
commands. 

The examination as to general knowledge of military 
duties outside of tactics, developed a crudeness and gen- 
eral indefiniteness of ideas which is largely attributable 
to the fact that in this branch of military science, there 
is in the State, with the exception of one or two late 
orders, no authority of later date than the Army Regula- 
tions of 1863, and even that very difficult of access. We 
therefore recommend that unless the proposed new sys- 
tem of Army Regulations is likely to be speedily issued, 
the State should publish a code for the guidance of its own 



r88 • \i>n rw r-Gi \i r \i 's rep( >r i . 

military forces; as no officer can fully tit himsell for his 
duties, or be expected to pass a satisfactory examination 
under t he present c< mdition of t hings. 
Ml ol whirl) is respectfully submitted. 

LUCIUS \. BARBOUR, I 

nt ( '. X. </., 

iru.v McCR] \. 

■></. 
■ r. s. .1. 

WILLIAM II. STOW1 . 



H 



I neral's Opfice, / 

HaR'I l-< »RD, ( '< >NN., < )«:t. 31,1881 j 

1 . »rge M. Harmon, 

utant-Gencrdl S/<r/<- of Connecticut. 

Sir: In accordance with Special Orders No. 107, we, 
the Examining Board, appointed by General Orders No. 
10, convened at this office to examine such officers as 

should appear bef( >re US. 

The following named officers appeared before us and 
. 1 a satisfactory examination : 

>r Frank M. WelCH, Fifth Battalion. 
wk v Fowler, Third Regiment. 
ain E. ROWS, Third Regiment. 
Captain -V. Ladieu, Fifth Battalion. 

First Lieutenant J AMES HORIGAN, Second Regiment. 

si Lieutenant William M. Mason, Third Regiment. 
.■1 Lieutenant John W First Regiment. 

Second Lieutedani I W. Wheeler, Fourth Regiment. 

The following named officer tailed to appear : 
tptain William F. Bid well, Third Regiment. 

LUCIUS \. BARBOUR, • \ 

Col 
WILLIAM IL STOW) ) 



6 4 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



[Jan., 



Report of Board of Survey. 



Hartford, Conn., 

July 22, 1881. 
Brigadier-General George M. Harmon, 

Adjutant-General State of Connecticut. 

General : 

In accordance with Special Orders 68, A. G. O., State 
of Connecticut, the undersigned, as a Board of Survey, 
have examined the military and other property of the 
State, at the State Arsenal this day, and have condemned 
the following named as unserviceable and unnecessary, 
and would recommend its disposal in accordance with 
statutes governing such dispositions. 



NUMBER. 



Sixty 

Seventy-three 

Twenty-nine . 

Sixty ._- 

Seventy-five 

Nine hundred and seventy-six 

Eigh ty-six __ 

Three hundred and forty 

One hundred and seventy-three 

Forty 

One hundred and one 

Fifty.. 

Two hundred and thirty 

Sixty-five 

One hundred and forty-six 

One hundred and thirty-nine 

Seventy - 

Four thousand 

Twenty thousand seven hundred and 

eighty-three ._ _ 

Fifteen hundred 

Fifteen thousand two hundred and 

sixty .. 



ARTICLES. 



Whitney Rifles and Bayonets. 

Whitney Pistols. 

Snare Drum Shells. 

Ramrods. 

Color Belts. 

Infantry Overcoats. 

Cavalry Overcoats. 

Eyelet Hooks. 

Cartridge Boxes and Plates. 

Cross Belt Plates. 

Waist Belts and Plates. 

Bayonet Scabbards. 

Cap Pouches. 

Cavalry Cartridge Boxes and Plates. 

Gun Slings. 

Musicians' Cross Belts and Plates. 

Pistol Holsters. 

Wood Tompions. 

Ball Cartridges, Cal. 42. 
Ball Cartridges, Cal. 43. 

Ball Cartridges, Cal. 58. 



[882.] AMI I W ! GENl R \i *S Rl POR I. 65 



\i: flCLES. 



Three hundre 1 Blank Cartridges, Cal. 13, 

Six hundred and seventy . Blank Cartridges, Cal 

One hundred and eighty-three. . Officers' Belts and Plates. 

Thirtj - N. C. O. S ishes. 

Fourteen. - - V< Swords. 

Chapel Tent with poles. 

Eighteen Bell Tents with poles. 

■-.. Furni 

One .- Lathe. 

One -. Polishing Wheel. 

Parts ... . Artillery Hai m-sses. 

Numbers and letters for caps. 



Very respectfully, 

C. L. [JPHAM, 

WILLIAM II. STOWE. 
HENRY C. DVVIGHT. 

Noti . — The Quarter-Master General was directed by Special Orders, No. 
Ba, A. G. O., August 4th. l88l, to sell the property condemned by the Hoard 
and report to this office the amount received. The proceeds of the sale will 
be given in the next report. 



66 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

[6] 

Rgport of the Collection of Pensions, Bounties, Etc. 



Adjutant-General's Office, / 

Hartford, Conn., December i, 1881. ) 

Brigadier-General George M. Harmon, 

Adjutant-General State of Connecticut : 

General: 

I have the honor to submit the following report of 
the, business of collecting pensions and bounties, prose- 
cuted through the office during the past year. 

The number of new claims filed during the year is 
very much less than that of 1880; this is explained 
by the fact that the time for filing claims, which would 
cover arrears of pension, expired July 1st, 1880, and 
there were but few soldiers suffering from any disability 
incurred in service but that filed their claims prior to 
the limitation. I cannot see how it is possible hereafter 
for many new claims for invalid pension to be presented. 
Some soldiers have been expecting that Congress would 
again extend the time for filing claims, covering arrears 
of pension, but I am very confident that the limitation of 
July 1, 1880, will never be extended. The information 
recently given to the public that the arrears of pension 
bill has already cost the country $50,000,000, and that it 
will require $235,000,000 to pay the claims already filed 
under it, has astonished the people and the universal 
demand appears to be that the pension laws shall not in 
any way be extended, and that proper safeguards shall 
be thrown around the business of settling and adjudica- 
ting claims in the pension office. It is probable that 
Congress, at its present session may enact some law for 
the more prompt and careful adjusting of claims. 

Although the number of new claims filed through the 
office this year is small compared with that of 1880, still 
the business has not decreased, and is, if anything, larger 



Ahjl l \\ r-Gl \l RA1 *S R] POR I. 67 

than before; this arises from the calls t>\ the Pension 
( >ffice for additional evidence and testimony in the i la mis 
still unsettled. These calls for evidence increase greatly, 
and the difficulty attending the collection ol the evi- 
dence is such that iii man} cases months elapse before 
the proper parties can be found who can test if) to the 
facts required ; it is also very evident thai in the sixteen 
years since the close ol the war. many officers and 
soldiers, who were necessary as witnesses to establish 

claims, have died, or have removed to parts unknown. 
and this same lapse of time has dimmed the memory of 
commanding officers and surgeons, so thai dates, causes, 
and treatment of disease of soldiers under their com- 
mand have been entirely forgotten; this is not to be 
wondered at, but it renders the settlement of claims all 
the more difficult, and adds vastly to the calls for evi- 
dence which will in any degree throw light on the claims. 

I have the pleasure to report that the claims for bounty 

by members of the Fifth Regiment Conn. Vols., have at 

been settled, and nearly all have been paid. These 

claims had been on file nearly ten years, and had twice 

been rejected, but feeling Confident that they were just, I 

led to?- a re-opening, and secured a decision from 

the Adjutant-General l\ S. A., acknowledging the date 

ot enlistment .i> shown by State records and rolls. This 

-ion carried a favorable settlement of the claims. 

The records of the office show that the number of 
claims hied during the year is as follov 

Invalid ... 1- 

Invalid Increase. 



Fathers 1 

Widow, war o! - . i 

bounty, 1 - 

Veteran bounty, 1 

tional bounty — Act of July, 1866 1 
Total bounty and arrears cla 

Total cla 

The number of pension claims lis ico, ol which 8 

have been rejected and 1, classified as toll. 



68 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

Invalids, 66 

Increase, 14 

Widows, ._ — 9 

Mothers, ___ 2 

Minor children, <. 1 

The amount collected on first payment of the 92 claims 
allowed was $71,076.58, which is $27,818.83 in excess of the 
amount collected last year, and is $43,634.88 larger than 
the payments in 1879. The average amount paid on the 
92 claims allowed was about $772. 

The number of bounty and arrears claims settled is 
65, of which 57 were granted and 8 rejected. The 
amount collected on the 57 claims, was $5,692.20. 

The execution of quarterly pension vouchers adds 
largely to the business of the office, and is undoubtedly 
of considerable benefit to the pensioners. The number 
of vouchers executed during the year and the amount 
collected, are as follows : 

Vouchers executed for December quarter, 1880, 183 

Amount collected, _ $5,074.44 

Vouchers executed for March quarter, 1881, 195 

Amount collected _ 12,156.54 

Vouchers executed for June quarter, 1881, 186 

Amount collected, __ 9,032.61 

Vouchers executed for September quarter, 1881, 184 

Amount collected, 5,426.21 

Total vouchers executed, _ ._ 748 

Total amount collected, .._ $31,689.80 

Total amount collected on pension vouchers executed 
in this office since June, 1871, $298,545.88. 

I am indebted to the present Commissioner of Pensions 
and to his predecessor and their valued assistants, for 
courtesies and endeavors to assist in the rapid settlement 
of all claims where poverty and distress required imme- 
diate attention. 

I am, General, very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

SIMEON J. FOX, 

A ssistant A djutant- General. 



_\| AI>M I \\ r-Gl \l R \l 'S Rl !•« >RT. 

[7] 

GENERAL ORDERS, 

STATE < ONNE< Ih 

\ •. 1. 

The following appointments on the Staff of the Commander-in-Chi< 

y announced 10 date from January They will be obeyed and 

accordingly. 

r.gi M. Harmon, of New Haven, Adjutant-General, with rank of 
idier-General. 

of Hart! ral, with rank 

oral. 

gory, of Norwalk, Surgeon-General, with rank of B 
dier-General. 

G II. Ford ol New Haven, Commissary-General, with rank of 

Brigadier-General. 

Middletown, Paymaster-General, with rank of 
Brigadier-General. 
W11 1.1 am E. Barrows, of Hartford. Aide-de-Camp, wi*hfank of Colonel. 
William B. RUDD, of Salisbury, Aide-de-Camp. with rank of Colonel. 
RUTHRRFORD TROWBRIDGE, of New Haven, Aide-de-Camp, with rank of 
Colonel. 
ni\kii- \. Russell, Killingly, Aide-de-Camp, with rank of Colonel. 
Sim \djutant-General, with rank of 

Lieutenant-Colonel. Re-appointed. 

Henrv ( M of < stant Quartermaster-General, 

with rank of Major. 

B\ order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

JE If. HARMON 

- ral. 



I T 

N //<i> [88l. 

The Brigadier-General command: d Guard i* directed to publish 

monthly, in General Orders, tl, ,v drills. r will 

be issued on the 15th of each month, and companies not making returns will 
be so reported. 



70 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

In making reports of drills, commanding officers will be certain that no 
members are reported present unless they are in uniform and in the ranks ; 
they will be held strictly accountable for any false returns made. 

Regimental commanders will verify the reports as often as possible and 
will assign Field and Staff Officers to attend drills when practicable. The 
standing of companies in this office will depend on the drill reports. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief. 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

A dju ta n t- Gen era I. 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

General Orders, ) Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 3. ) Hartford, February 15, 188 1. 

General and Special Orders received by commanding officers from higher 
authority will not be copied in order books. 

File books, with adhesive stubs, for filing of orders received, will be is- 
sued to every commanding officer, — one for General and orte for Special Or- 
ders, which will be filed in order of date. 

Orders issued by commanding officers will be copied in their order books 
as heretofore. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

A dju ta n t- Genera I. 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

General Orders, ) Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 4. ) Hartford, April 20, 188 1. 

I. In accordance with the requirements of " An Act to reduce the limit of 
the Military Force of this State," passed by the General Assembly, January 
Session, A. D. 1881, and approved April 14, 1881, the National Guard will 
parade in May for- inspection and muster on the dates and at the hours in- 
dicated herein. 

First Regiment. — Co. A, May 10, 2.30 p.m. ; Co. B, May 10, 4 p. m. ; Co. 
C, May 12, 10 a. m. ; Co. D, May 11, 2.30 p. m. ; Co. E, May 11, 4 p. m. ; Co. 
F, May 13, 10 a. m. ; Co. G, May 12, 2 p. m. ; Co. H, May 10, 9 A. m. , Co. I, 
May 13, 3 p. m. ; Co. K, May 11, 9 a. m. 

Second Regiment. — Co. A, May 20, 3 p. m. ; Co. B, May 17, 8.30 a. m. ; 
Co. C, May 17, 10 a. m. ; Co. D, May 18, 2.30 p. m., Co. E, May 17, 2 p. m. ; 
Co. F, May 17, 4 p. m. ; Co. G, May 20, 4.30 p. m. # ; Co. H, May 18, 9.30 a. m. ; 
Co. I, May 19, 2 p. m. ; Co. K, May 19, 9 a. m. 

Third Regiment. — Co. A, May 24, 2 p. m. ; Co. B, May 24, 8.30 a. m. • 
Co. C, May 25, 2.30 p. m. ; Co. D, May 25, 8.30 a. m. ; Co. E, May 27, 9 a. m. ; 
Co. F, May 26, 9 a. m. ; Co. G, May 26, 2 p. m. ; Co. I, May 25, 10 a. m. ; Co. 
K, May 27, 2 p. m. 



jgg 2 adit r.w r-Gl m R \i 'S Rl P< >F ' ■ 7 1 

\ M,v ,. 10 v.m 
D.May 5 .2P.M.;( o B, Mai I «■ 

G, Ma 3 |.fl L *.; ' o [.Mi] ' k M ' 

4 '• M - 

Fifth Battalion.- Co a. Mij .- Co. B May 13. B.30 \. u. ; 

,. M . . Co. I). M'\ »5. I '"■ M - 
Artillery, isi Platoon, May si, 9 *• *• • -'> Pl*t°° n ' M *■ 

11 Such officer as may be directed, mil conduct the inspection ....-I no 
„ t l0 lhis office, as soon as may be practicable, ..t the standing .....1 con- 
din, -not thevarioui showing the number present and 

their discipline, instruction, militai 

equipments and uniforms, condition of company quarters, know 
duties neatness and accuracy of company books and papers, and such othei 
information as in his opinion maybe useful to the Commander-in-chief, with 
w todisbandment of such coropai ij fall below a propel stand- 

ard of efficiency for their retention in service. 

HI. Company commanders will prepare dupHeate muster rolls tor use of 
the Inspecting officer, and see that all recruits are examined by the Surgeon, 
and their papers forwarded to this < or before the inspection. The 

rolls must account for every officer and enlisted man whose name appeared 
on the last muster-roll, and will give all informatfon provided for by the 
blank furnished. Pay-rolls for services will be prepared and forwarded in 

the usual manner. 

IV. The time not required for inspection will be devoted to target prac- 
tice un der th< sion of the Inspector of Target Practice. The Brig- 

spector of Target Practice will give instruction in regard to the prac- 
tice, and will direct in regard to returns. He will report to this office the 
number practicing in each company, the ^core of each company, 

and the name and score of the best marksman in each con. 

V. Co. II. Third regiment (Killingly), and Co. H. Fourth n Litch- 
field) are hereby disbanded, and the officers and men discharged from the 
military service ol the State. The Quartermaster-General will take imme- 
diate charge of the State properly of these com; Ml records, books. 
blanks, etc.. will be forwarded to this office. 

VI. The Second, Third, and Fourth Regiments, and the Artillery will en- 
camp at Nianticlor six days commencing September 5th. under the com- 
mand of the Brigadier-General. The Fifth Battalion will parade ai such 
place and on indudate as the Major commanding may direct, between the 
i.»th day of August and the 20th 

Vil lance with the concernii 

Yorki 

A I, ril 14th, 1881, the First Regiment I 

V, . in October, 1881, tnd m ia th< R< .. n ■ nl 

ned it will no the fall ►camp- 

tot. 

rder of the Commander-in-Cl 

GEO. M. HARMON 

A.: tral. 



72 ADTUTANT-GENERAL^S REPORT. [Jan., 

STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

General Orders, ) Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 5. ) Hartford, May 2, 1881. 

The following Acts of the General Assembly, passed January Session, A. 
D. 1881, are published for the information of all concerned. Unless other- 
wise stated, these acts take effect May 1st, 1881. 

CHAPTER IX. 
An Act authorizing Regulations for Government of National 

Guard. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Assembly 
convened : 

The Commander-in-Chief is authorized to make and publish regulations 
for the government of the National Guard, in accordance with the laws of 
the State. 

Approved, March 1st, 1881. 

CHAPTER XXVI. 

An Act establishing a Permanent Camp Ground for the Connecti- 
cut National Guard. 
Be it enacted by the Senate arid House of Representatives in General Assembly 

convened : 

Section i. There shall be a commission consisting of the quartermaster- 
general, the brigadier-general, and three persons appointed by the Governor, 
whose duty it shall be to locate and secure to the State the title to and pos- 
session of such lands as they mav decide to be sufficient and adapted to the 
use designed, to be used as a permanent camp ground for the Connecticut 
National Guard. 

Sec. 2. The State of Connecticut is hereby authorized to take any land 
which the commissioners aforesaid deem necessary for such permanent camp 
ground and approaches thereto. 

Sec. 3. If the said commissioners cannot agree with any owner or owners 
upon the amount to be paid for land thus taken, they may prefer their petition 
in the name of the State of Connecticut, to the Superior Court held in the 
county where the land so taken lies, or if said court is not in session to 
either judge thereof, praying that such compensation may be determined, 
which shall be accompanied by a summons served on such owners as other 
civil process before said court, and upon said petition said court or judge 
shall appoint a committee of three disinterested men, who, after being sworn 
and giving reasonable notice to the parties interested, shall view such land, 
ascertain its value, assess just damages to the owner or owners thereof, and 
report their doings to said court or judge, and such report may be accepted 
by said court or judge, or may be rejected by said court or judge, for any 
irregular or improper conduct on the part of said committee in the per- 
formance of their said duties ; if the report be rejected the said court or 
judge shall appoint another committee who shall proceed in the same man- 
ner as the first were required to proceed. 



iSS Al'ir I \\ r-GI \l k \l \s l:l P( >l: I. 

i. The acceptance ol the report ol such committee shall have the 
effect ol ;i judgment in favot "i the ownei ol the land againel 1 1 1 * - Si 
Connecticut foi tin- amount ol 1 1 1 « - assessment made bj said commits i 
said court 01 judge may make sny ordet net i the protei tion ol the 

iiuhi< <n all persons interested in the land so taken. But said land shall 
not be enclosed 01 used by the State until the amount ol said judg 
shall in- paid i<» tin- party i" whom it is due, or deposited fot his use with 
the treaaurei of the county in which said land lies, and upon such payment 
or deposit said land shall heroine the property ol the State ol Connecticut. 
Sec. 1 i rises and costs ol said netting before the court or judge 
•ier with the actn.il expenses ol said commission and a rea- 
sonable compensation foi thru services, sh ill be audited and allowed by the 

Holler and paid by the tiea-nier. 

6. 'I'he sum of ten thousand dollars i-* hereby appropriated from any 
money in the tteasurv not otherwise appropriated t<> carry into effect the pro- 
visions of this act. 

Approved. March id, 1SS1. 

CHAPTER XXXI. 
,\\ Act amending an Act relating to thr Militia. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Assembly 

ned : 

The brigadier-general commanding the National G-nard may appoint two 
orderlies to rank as sergeants, who shall appear mounted on all days of re- 
views and parades, and he shall issue warrants for such appointments. 

Approved, March 16, l88l. 

CHAPTER XXXII. 
AM A' i : iin Rwk OF THE ASSISTANI ADJUTANT-GeNERAI 

,\m> iin A—;- \ Q irtermaster-General. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of A'epresentati-res in General Assembly 

ned : 

The rank of the assistant adjutant-general shall he that of Colonel, and 
the rank of the assistant quartermaster general shall he that of lieutenant- 
colonel. 

March i6, 1S81. 

CHAPTER LIII. 

i WO, Ch \i - Ti i : i Tl n. "i i in 

Statutes, Miu i la. 

Beit in General Assembly 

ned : 
Section ti ter sis, title ten of thi 

ed by striking out. in tin- tenth ami eleventh line**, tb< their 

respective comn in their written order." and inserting as (><' 

" in p- 

IO 



74 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

or person authorized to receive the same the amount of all stoppages due 
from said person under the by-laws of the company, or the provisions of any 
law of the State, also all assignments made for rations furnished at any pa- 
rade or encampment. In any organization in which there is no paymaster, 
the adjutant-general may detail an officer to make payments as prescribed by 
this act. The regimental paymasters and officers detailed as paymasters 
shall give bonds, with surety, to the State in the sum of ten thousand dollars, 
conditioned for the faithful discharge of their duties. 
Approved, April i, 1881. 

CHAPTER LIV. 

An Act in relation to Inspection and Musters of the National 

Guard. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Assembly 

convened : 

The Commander-in-Chief is authorized to order evening inspections and 
musters of the National Guard, and for absence from such inspection or 
muster, each member shall be liable to the same fines as for absence from 
any legally authorized parade or encampment. 

Approved, April 1, 1881. 

CHAPTER LXXXI. 

An Act relating to the Connecticut National Guard. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Assembly 

convened : 

The Connecticut National Guard shall contain one battery of light artille- 
ry, and the three platoons of the same shall consist of such officers and men, 
and be located in such towns, as the Commander-in-Chief shall order. 

Approved, April 6, 1881. 

CHAPTER CXLII. 

An Act to Limit the Military Force of this State. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Assembly 

convened : 

SECTION i. After January 1st, 1882, the active militia of this State shall 
not exceed forty companies of infantry and one battery of artillery. 

Skc. 2. On or before July first, 1881, the Commander-in-Chief shall, upon 
the report of an inspection, which shall be made in May, 1881, under his or- 
der, disband so many companies as may be necessar)' to reduce the force to 
or below the limit fixed in section one of this act. 

Sec. 3. Each company of the Governor's Guards shall be entitled to an 
armory, to be provided by the quartermaster-general and paid for by the 
Comptroller on approval by the Governor, and one dollar per year for care of 
each rifle or saber issued to them by the State, to be paid by the Comptroller, 
and each member of any company of the Governor's Guards who shall pa- 
rade annually in May, for one day's drill or shall do active duty at any other 



l8c Al-ji i.w r-Gl \! k.M 'S Rl POR I. 

tine, when the Commander-in-Chief, shall reci is t«>i. 

Foi each ^commissioned office] sod private, twodol- 

in addition th< tnmutation of ration dollar 

ami twenty cents foi each officer, .nil thirty cmi^t-.r each enlists l man, and 
ii horse used !>\ any commissioned officei entitled I mounted, 

: iv, end t'M each horse used bj each non-com mi 
: ni unit' day, and lorage for 

each horse when us< twenty-six and two-thirds cents p< 

fifty dollars my foi a band "t music when parading 

cort to the Governor, fortwo mus ■■• when otberwii 

(.it-red out by tin- Commander-in-Chief, and fifty 
commandant of msible lor the 

State property in their possession, ami actual cost of transportation l 
inies when ordered out by fix- Commander-in-Chief for drill, \ . 
>n duty as above provided, ail of which payments -h.ill he made on 
properly receipted pay-rol I and sworn to by the commanding offi- 

cer, to be paid by the comptroller on the a; proval of the Governor. 

S 4. All issues of arms equipments, and uniforms, to the companies 
of the Governor's G ll Is, shall he made in such manner as shall he from 
time to time provided foi by the G< era Assembly, hut this act shall in no 
w...\ affect the property of the State now in th Trior's 

S . fanuary hist. 1882, no company oi military beyond the 

number authorized in section one of this act shall receive from the State any 
aid or compensation whatever, - above provided lor the Governor's 

, hut this section shall not affect the loan of arms and equipments 

• v the quartermaster-general, when authorized th< 

The Commander-in-Chief may accept the second company 
ernor's Foot Guards into the National Guard, and may assign them to the 

:it, when l shall occur therein. The mend' 

accepted shall sign enlistment papers, and those members whom the 1 
shall certify to have served faithfully 1 1 more may be enlis) 

date back one year, ami those members whom the captain shall certify to 
1 faithfully for five years may be re-en! v law provided 

for members of the National Guard. This rdered for 

esccrt duty if the Governor so desire. 

-hall take effect from its passage. 
Approved, April 14, 1S81. 

CHAPTER CXLIrL 

1 
1 // m 

ned : 

I 1 as follows. The n . „ ,h c 

ill annually, at some time t ,« 
tober and the h followii . 



y6 . adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

rolled alphabeticall)' by or under the supervision of the selectmen of the 
town in which they reside. On such enrollment lists and opposite the name 
of every person, exempt from military duty, or a minor, or in the active mi- 
litia, the selectmen shall write " exempt" and the reason of such exemption, 
or " minor" or " active militia," as the case may be, and shall sign said lists 
and file them in the office of the town clerk of such, town ; and annually, 
on or before the first day of April, make report to the adjutant-general of 
the total number enrolled on their respective town lists, the number marked 
exempt by reason of disability, the number exempt by reason of other causes, 
the number of minors, the number of active militia, the number liable to 
military duty, and the number liable to pay commutation tax as hereinafter 
provided, and shall certify that they believe said lists to be correct. The 
adjutant-general shall forward the return of the number liable to pay a com- 
mutation tax to the state treasurer. 

Sec. 2. Section six (page 112) of the general statutes is amended to read 
as follows: The selectmen of every town shall, on every rate-bill for its an- 
nual tax, add a tax of two dollars on every person so enrolled as liable to 
military duty, except minors and members of the active militia, which tax 
shall be a commutation of military duty, and collected and paid to the town 
at the time and in the manner provided for town taxes. The town treasu- 
rers shall pay to the treasurer of the State, on or before the tenth day of No- 
vember annually, such military commutation tax as is determined to be due 
from their respective towns by the returns of the selectmen .to the adjutant- 
general last before made, except as hereafter provided, and the treasurer 
shall have the same power to enforce such payment as he has in the case of 
any State tax. The town treasurers in making the payments above provided 
for, may hereafter deduct therefrom a sum equal to that part of the commu- 
tation taxes placed upon the rate-bills of their respective towns last issued 
which cannot be collected, not to exceed ten per cent, of such taxes. 

Approved, April 14, 1881. 



SPECIAL ACT CLXXX1II. 

An Act relating to the Encampment of the Connecticut National 

Guard. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Assembly 

convened : 

The town of East Lyme may, at a special town meeting warned and held 
for the purpose, adopt by-laws regulating the sale of goods, merchandise, 
or other articles at booths, by peddlers, and regulating the licensing of car- 
riages or other vehicles for public use during the time when the Connecti- 
cut National Guard or any part thereof is encamped in said town ; but all 
restraints and prohibitions prescribed in such by-laws shall extend to all 
persons without discrimination. 

Approved, April 14, 1881. 



|SS_\ ADJ1 I W I GENER \h'S U P< 'I: I . 

SPECIAL to l CLXXXIV. 

An \. i CONCERNING Mil YORK I 'M\ N CBLKBRAT1 

iky the Senate- iinii Hou t it Assembly 

; \ i rhe Commander-in-Chief may, at his discretion, desigi 
regiment of the National Guard to represent tin*- State al the centennial cel- 
ebration of the battle oi Yorktown. 

S rhe spring parade and the encampment <>i the regiment so de- 

signated shall be suspended foi the yeai 1881, and the members ol said reg- 
iment shall be allowed the regular pay for the same numbei <>( days' si 
that ihey would receive foi the parades and encampmem 

that they perform that number of days' service in representing the S tt<- 
at Yorktown. 

3. The quartermaster-general shall provide transportation foi the 
regiment and its camp equipage, and the sum is hereby appi 

ted therefor, and for cam] Any additional cost of transportation 

shall he borne by the regiment. 

4. The Governor and staff, and the Yorktown commissioner from 
ate, are directed to attend said centennial celebration, and the quarter- 

ral shall provide tor transportation and expenses. 
- [*he Commander-in-Chief may direct the first and second com- 
panies of Goveri 1 Guards to accompany him to Yorktown, provided 

that they will consent to go without any claim lor per diem or other allow- 
ance of any sort : and will agree to pay for their own transportation, music, 
and commissary supplies, and in that event the sum of one thousand dollars 
is appropriated to each of said companies which accepts the conditions of 
Section, and actually sends at least sixty men rank and file, with their 
officers, and is present at Yorktown as long as the Governor directs. 
\ ; - ril 14, 1SS1. 
By order of the ( 'omrnander-in-Chief. 

GEORGE M. HARMON, 

Adjutant-General. 



-1 ATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

Ami I an l GEN! i:.M ( S OF! 

No. 6. 1S81. 

The petition of fifty-one members of Compact* F, Third Regiment, Con- 
necticut National Guard, for re-instatement ol iptain 
1 any F, Third Regim< ■ • I , N tfully denii 'ding 

'. men all the points (Maimed, both by himself and by men. 1 

the company, be would still be "guilty ol gh harge 

of two members Of his command, and ol 

rendering fictitious accounts therefor." rt oi the" Mil 

\V 11 ren, < !om| anj 1 
tfa tor the information ol all 1 1 



78 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

To Brigadier-General Edward Harland, Adjutant-General of the State of 

Connecticut. * 

General: The undersigned having been appointed by Special Order No. 
40 Adjutant-General's OfBce. a military board of examiners " to inquire into 
the propriety of conduct of Captain George Warren, Company F, Third 
Regiment. C. N. G., in procuring the discharge of Privates Peter Gardner 
and Jesse Miner, Company F, Third Regiment, for insubordination and for 
the good of the company and service, and in selling and making returns to 
the company for uniforms sold by him," respectfully report, that in pursu- 
ance of said orders and after due notice given to the several parties in in- 
terest as to the time, place, and purpose of said examination, they met at 
the armory of Company G, Third Regiment, in Putnam on the 28th day of 
June, 1880, and by adjournment on the following day, all the members of 
the Board being present and duly sworn. Capt. Warren was present in 
person, and was represented by the Hon. J. M. Lyon as counsel, said Gard- 
ner and Miner were present, and were represented by the Hon. Harrison 
Johnson as counsel. A large number of witnesses were examined under 
oath, including: Capt. Warren, Peter Gardner, and Jesse Miner. From all 
the evidence offered and obtained we report the following as the facts 
found by us in the matters under examination : 

Peter Gardner became a member of Company F, Third Regiment, by en- 
listment under date of December 8, 1875, and Jesse Miner March 28, 1877. 
Captain Warren became the commanding officer of the company February 
20, 1S79, at which time Gardner was acting in the capacity of a sergeant, 
and Minor as a corporal. During Captain Warren's term both had been ad- 
vanced until at the time of their discharge both were acting sergeants, Gard- 
ner as first, and Miner as second. Neither had ever been warranted, as have 
none who are now acting as non-commissioned officers in the company. 
Gardner and Miner were both discharged upon application of Captain War- 
ren dated March 2, 1S80. The reasons assigned for their discharge were 
" insubordination and for the good of the company and service." Their dis- 
charge dates March 25, 1880. 

The reasons which Captain Warren gave to your board for his action in 
procuring Gardner's discharge were five in number, viz : 

(1.) That Gardner was incompetent to perform the duties of first sergeant 
by reason of his inferior education. 

(2.) That upon one occasion Gardner cast two ballots in an election of a 
lieutenant. 

(3.) That Gardner once gave him a false excuse for absence from drill. 

(4.) That Gardner had falsely reported in the company that he, the cap- 
tain, didn't wish any French in the company. 

(5.) Gardner's conduct as member of the auditing committee, hereafter 
more fully detailed. 

Without discussing the truth of the first charge, your board finds that it 
was not a sufficient reason for Gardner's discharge from the service. As to 
the second, Gardner himself frankly confesses that once, and only once, he 
cast a double vote. This was upon an informal ballot, and it was done openly 



lSSj. \l>M r.w r-Gl M RAl 'S Rl P< >R I. 

ami with do attempt at concealment. Upon the formal ballot which fol 
hi- casi bui one vote. 
The third and fourth charges real solelj upon the statement i 

n upon One side, and Gardner's explicit denial upon the other. No 
other evidence was obtainable upon eithei point. 

The charges against Miner made by Captain Warren were three, rii 

That upon one occasion he bad been disobedient in refusing to put 
on his cap ami blouse and go upon tin- street to drill when order 

That he was reported asone who ttra ballots at theelection 

above referred to. 

(3.) That he had participated with Gardner in his investigations and im- 

1 conduct as member of the auditing committee. 

The fust charge was supported bv tin- evidence ot Capt. Warren and de- 
nied by Miner, who savs that he may have made objection to going OUt upon 
the street, to which he was opposed, and that he may have spoken and voted 

going when the matter was brought up in company meeting, as 

it was Captain Warren's frequent custom to do when it was proposed to go 
upon the street, but that he never refused to go, and in fact did go when 
ordered. The evidence of other parties upon this point was of the v 
character, and served to throw little light upon the matter. The previous 
good character and conduct of Miner as a man and a soldier, which all 
without exception commended, would render your board slow to believe 
upon the evidence before it that Miner upon the occasion referred to was 
disobedient and disrespectful to his superior officer. 

The second charge Miner stoutlv denies. As only vague rumor is ad- 
duced to the contrary we must acquit Miner of this charge. 

We have thus far discussed the various reasons assigned by Captain 
Warren, excepting the last one in each case. Whatever may be thought of 
the truth of them, your board feel that they had little to do in influencing 
the action of Captain Warren in the matter under consideration. They were 
none of them regarded as of any moment at the time they occurred. They 
had not called for reproof from Captain Warren. They had passed by as 
the ordinary incidents of indiscretion such as many soldiers unwittingly 
commit. The real reason which actuated Captain Warren your board finds 
embraced in the last charge against each of them which remains to I 
sidered. Everything else would have long err this been forgotten and for- 
given. 

Upon the last chaige we find the facts as fol 

ting of the company held February (8th, 1880, Lieutenant II. E. 

Leach, who had for a considerable lime prior fh rerof 

Company, having resigned his commission and his 
ited that a committee be appointed to audit his accounts. Th 

tion w tain Warren n >t this 

•ud Mavn.ird. 
. •• there hi 

pany as 1 

<• of old uniforms, which sale (apt. tin Warren had bad in 



8o adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

charge under the vote cf the Company. This discussion doubtless led to 
the appointment of the committee. Captain Warren claims to have also 
been a member of the committee, but the records do not so disclose the 
fact and other members, including Gardner, did not so understand it. More- 
over, a week later, February 25th, another vote appears upon the records ad- 
ding Capi. Warren to the committee. In the meantime it was arranged by the 
committee that Gardner should get Leach's books and vouchers. This he 
did. Upon examining the books Gardner found that the books showed 
only $9.35 as turned into the treasury from the sale of uniforms. This 
Gardner did not understand. The entry lent plausibility to the stories 
which had been whispered about. Immediately and without disclosing his 
suspicions to any other of the committee, or consulting Captain Warren in 
the matter he determined to ascertain the facts. This course he says he 
pursued that he might not raise the question if there was no foundation for 
his fears. He wrote at once to G. W. Simmons & Son, of Boston, to whom 
the sale had been made, for the price paid, went to the bank and learned the 
amount of the check received, and called upon the Company Clerk for the 
votes which had been passed with respect to the sale and the use of the pro- 
ceeds. The result of his inquiries was still unsatisfactory when he met 
Lieut. Maynard by arrangement — Lieut. Clements being absent — to look 
over the books together. At that time Gardner communicated to Maynard 
his suspicions, what he had done, and the results. They arranged to call 
upon the Captain for an explanation. Lieut. Maynard first saw Capt. War- 
ren and told him of the matter. Subsequently both Lieut. Maynard and 
Gardner called upon the Captain together, when Captain Warren rather 
soundly abused Gardner, and he left. Immediately thereafter — February 
29th — Captain Warren sent Gardner a letter purporting to reduce him to 
the ranks. The letter is important only as showing the motives which were 
actuating Captain Warren. The reasons which this letter assigns for the 
reduction were that Gardner had been interfering too much in Captain War- 
ren's affairs and making trouble. The same day a similar note was sent 
Miner. Miner had, as far as appears, taken no active part in the inquiries set 
on foot by Gardner, and was wholly ignorant of them. He was, however, a 
close friend of Gardner, both being French, and had accompanied Gardner, 
entirely accidentally and without knowledge of Gardner's purposes as he 
alleges in his visit to the Bank, and the Company Clerk. March 2d, Captain 
Warren forwarded through the regular channels an application for the dis- 
charge of both Gardner and Miner. A regular meeting of the Company 
occurred on the following night. Captain Warren placed two men under 
arms on guard at the door of the armory with orders to keep out both Gard- 
ner and Miner. Both presented themselves and were kept out by the guard. 
Captain Warren assigns as his reasons for this action that he considered 
that they were not members of the Company as their discharge had been 
applied for, and that he was afraid that the men would do some bodily in- 
jury to Gardner and Miner if he admitted them. At the meeting Captain 
Warren announced his action discharging the two men, appointed new men 
to act as sergeants, and another member of the Company upon the auditing 
committee in the place of Gardner removed. March 25th the discharges 
were issued from the Adjutant-General's office. 



\l>|l l \\ r-GEN1 R \l 'S REPOR I. 8l 

As to the character of the two men, and ih nducl the testi- 

mony was unanimous t h.u they were good men, faithful aud obedient sol- 
and valuable members "i the Company. Captain Warren himself 
■ays that he baa no complaint i<> make concerning them, • as to 

these matters which arose just previous to theii dischai 

In view di tlit- foregoing youi board feel i ompelled i<> rind thai l • * » 1 1 1 IV- 
rardnei and [esse Minei were discharged i<>i insufficient reasons. The 
conduct which furnished the ground foi their discharge was noi an oi 
which merited a discharge. Neithei had done anything which oversu 

their duty, propriety, or soldierly conduct. G 
Hon upon the committee required him to examine carefully and thoroughly 
into the finances of the company, and justified him in pursuing any reason- 
able investigation to that end. The military r.mk of no member of the 
Company should shield him from the inquiries which Gardner a- a civil offi- 
the Company was in duty bound to mab □ Warren doubtless 

felt that the course of Gardner and Miner was ctful to him as their 

commanding officer. In this we feel that be was in error. The position of 
.Gardner and the circumstances furnished .iw ample justification for all 
that was done. 

Upon the second branch of our inquiry your board find that Captain 
Warren w; ,. appointed by his command a committee to 

sell according to his own judgment the old uniforms then by law become 
the property of the Company. The Company records add "and after de- 
ducting all e to turn the balance in to the treasurer of 
the Company." It was strongly urged by Gardner, and supported by the 
testimony of other members that there was no such provision in the motion 
md claimed that the records have been changed by (he insertion 
of this clause, as by its position could readily have been done. The Clerk 
howi . | that he believed the records accurate, and that no change 
had been ma ie in them since first written at the time. Captain Warren tes- 
tified to the same effect. This question it seems to your board unnecessary 
to decide in view of the other fact which we find existing. The uniforms were 
sold in the early part of September to G. W. Simmons & Sons, of Boston, for 
$130, being at the rate of $2.50 per uniform. This amount Captain Warren 
accounts for as follow- 

nd for uniforms of Company officers and Major 
Johnson and expends thereon, .... - 1J190.65 
Cash pa .id time, - 30.OO 

Cash turned over to Company treasurer, .... 9.35 



$130.00 
The charg by the complainants in relation to this matter divide 

- into thr- 
That Captain Warren concealed from the Company the actual amount 
received by him, and induced the < re thai $100 was the 

whole amount so r« 

That the account subsequentl v rendered of $30 fol 
time m the deficiency appearing 

after it became known that $130 
I I 



82 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

(3.) That a portion of the sum of $90.65 was improperly used by him in 
payment of officers' uniforms. 

First. — The negotiations for the sale of the uniforms were conducted 
wholly by correspondence, and that with one firm. The first and only offer 
made by them was $2.50 per uniform. This offer Captain Warren reported 
to the Company and it was voted to accept. The uniforms were at once for- 
warded and check for $130 returned. Immediately thereafter a Company 
meeting was held of which the following entry was made on the records. 

"Committee reported on the sale of the old uniforms saying that they 
could receive the sum of $100, which was accepted by the Company, this 
being the amount after paying all expenses." No other report it is agreed 
was ever made until after the present trouble arose and the subject was 
never discussed at any other meeting. The doings of this meeting therefore 
become important as throwing light upon the conduct of Captain Warren, 
and your board heard a large amount of testimony thereon. The testimony 
of the members of the Company seems to be overwhelming that the report 
then made was that the uniforms had been shipped, but that upon examina- 
tion by the buyers they proved in so damaged and moth-eaten condition, 
that they would only pay $100 for them, expenses paid, as preferred by the 
Company. A considerable discussion arose as to the condition of the uni- 
forms, the reason why they should receive less than Company G of the same 
place, etc., etc. After further statement from the Captain as to the reasons 
assigned, it was voted to accept the $100 offer. Captain Warren explains 
the report and vote as a final report made after the sale in which he reported 
$100 as the net proceeds, which the Company approved. He does not pre- 
tend that he submitted any statement of his expenses, but claims that the 
Company understood that they were $30 in amount. Your board inquired 
in vain for any member of the Company who knew until months afterwards 
that $130 had been received, or that an allowance of $30 had been made for 
expenses. In view of this fact, and the discussion which was unquestiona- 
bly had at the Company meeting above referred to, together with other cir- 
cumstantial evidence which was elicited by your board, we are convinced 
that Captain Warren withheld ftom the Company the knowledge of the ac- 
tual amount received by him, and that he did not deal fairly and frankly 
with them in the statements he made and the action which he brought about. 
Evidence was presented to show that the last clause in the record of Sep- 
tember 12th was not in the original vote, and that it was improperly inserted 
at the time or afterwards. It appeared that the clerk frequently made up his 
records from reports made to him by Captain Warren. He however thinks 
that he was present at this meeting and reported it correctly. On the other 
hand, the members present who were examined, either had no definite re- 
membrance of the matter or a wholly different impression. No one could 
be tound who had ever heard the subject of expenses discussed, or in any 
way referred to. If it was in the original vote it could not have been clearly 
understood by the meeting. 

Second. — The statement which Captain Warren subsequently rendered 
to the Company and which he presented to your board to account for the $30 
is made up as follows : 



[882.] M'.ir rAN r-GEN] R U 'S Rl P< >R i. 83 

To two !• n Vnik, ..... 

Boston, 

•• 4 days' mm-, 7.00 

•• two b< ixes, -------- 

ish paid express, .----- jo 

I30.00 
These visits to New York and Boston were claimed t<> be f < » 1 the pui 
of dis] the old uniforms. It made st all they must have been made 

between August [3th and about Septembei [sf. That anything was accom- 
plished upon either of these trips is not claim* 1 tain Warren. Upon 
none ol them did be see even a possible buyer. The negotiations which 
finally resulted in tin- sale wen- begun alter the last of these visits and con- 
ducted wholly by letter. That these visits wen- made at all, rests solely 
upon the testimony of Captain Warren. Your board was unable to learn of 
any one who, at any time- before, during, 01 immediately aftei tin- visits had 
any knowledge of his purpose to go, of his absence, or that he had been. 
in Warren was suggest some corroborating circumstance to 

show that he had paid any of these visits, but without avail. No officer or 

member of the Company as far as we could learn had ever had any direct or 
indirect kn trips. A gentleman associated with him in 

business had no knowledge of his having been absent as claimed, lie had 

d, told any one that he was going, had been, or of any 
ent transpiring upon either occasion. On the other hand, the amounts 
Charged purport fares only, but the New York fare is not charged 

as it c aisled at the time, and the gentleman above referred to as connected 
with Captain Warren in business testified, although reluctantly, that he had 
recently heard i barren state to a New York gentleman in conver- 

sation that he had been to New York but once, and that that was on his way 
home from the Centennial. These- and other considerations under it impos- 
sible for your board to satisfy itself that Captain Warren ever made the 
four trips as claimed by him. The weight of testimony is Strongly to thecon- 
trarv. 

'bird item in tl S7 for time spent. Such 

a charge would be proper providing the time was actually spent as cb 
and H ! the charge and a I 1* Captain 

York and H >st.,.n as claimed, clearly th< 
was never given to the service of t h ny. But assuming that these 

made, it i< clear from Capt tin W.i story that no allow- 

ance understanding^ and knowingly made to him for his time. 

The remamin ,.d! and n< «n. 

■ -m all f led to find 

that the account of $3 time is n 

and that it • \ ear. 

Third.- 1 itement ai 

At the mi : u h. , "that the sum of $20 be 

lent to each officer amounting in a 

lotion not cleai ed in tb< 13 . thai the 



84 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

Company should advance the money set apart as above for the purchase of 
the officers' new uniforms then being procured, less the $10 then soon tc be- 
come due each officer from the State, and that the Company should receive 
repayment from subsequent annual allowances. The amount so appropria- 
ted was then thought to be sufficient for the purpose. September 27th, when 
the uniforms came, the three together with that of Major Johnson, a former 
captain of the Company, came in one package addressed to Captain Warren, 
C. O. D. The bill for the whole was $90.25, and expressage 40 cents ; 67.50 
of this amount was for the uniforms of the Company officers, and $22.75 was 
the price of Major Johnson's. Captain Warren then had in his safe the 
money received from the sale of the uniforms, and paid the bill out of that 
amount. He then paid Treasurer Leach, who was present, $9.35, being the 
balance of $100. 

In this transaction we cannot find that Captain Warren intended any 
wrong. There was no attempt at concealment. The money was used as the 
most convenient, and with the expectation that when Major Johnson should 
pay for his, the amount should be paid into the treasury, the Captain, as he 
says, standing responsible for the amount. In using$67.5o for the Company 
officers, Captain Warren transgressed the letter of his authority, but we 
think with no intention of defrauding the company. On the contrary we 
think he acted within the spirit of the Company's action. In the whole mat- 
ter of the use of the $90.65 we therefore find that at most Captain Warren 
committed only a technical breach of authority or trust, and acted with no 
purpose to deceive or defraud. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

LUCIUS A. BARBOUR, 
Colonel 1st Regt C. N. G., Prest of Board. 
FRED. A. SPENCER, 

Captain id Regt C N. G. 
SAxMUEL O. PRENTICE, 
• id Lieut. Co. K, \st Reg't, and 

Recorder of the Board. 
Dated this 18th day of September, 1880. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEORGE M. HARMON, 

A djutant- General. 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

General Orders, ) Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 7. ) Hartford, June 1, 1881. 

The following regulations for Target Practice are published for the guid- 
ance of the National Guard. 

I. The Brigade Inspector of Target Practice shall have general super- 
vision of the Regimental Inspectors, and may, with the approval of the 
Brigadier-General commanding give directions necessary to insure unifor- 
mity in their instruction, practice, and returns, and on the 15th day of No- 
vember each year shall forward to this office a complete classification of the 



IDJUTANT-GENERAl/S REPORT. 

.vitii tin- names of the m • tnd iharp- 

ihoot< II. is authorized lo 

call foi mental [i tl any time, in ordei to 

tain how tl irrying <>ut tin- practice requin 

I I. The R< gimental Inspect 
struction in tat 

imeot. He will be :• mmanding officei that lb 

of the rried out in conformity with the official 

ual in ' 'Mil this . the coin m.i n l.itits ol 

in all mal Nc will attend all para*!' 

• 
the [nstroctoi when in- bo attends. On tin- ist da] 
be shall make a return <>t the classification ol the merit, 

>rward it to tin- Brigade [nspectoi with the i 

of all marksmen and sharpshooters qnalifying during the year and their 

- 

III. A practice of each ■>! at least one-half day will be held in 

which shall \>v on the da] "i regular parade authorized by 
law. unless otherwise ordered, the date of par.ide being fixed by the com- 
mandant of the Regiment. The instruction and practice will be in the posi- 
tion and aiming drill He, in mass or vollev firing file and skirmish 
firing, advance and retreat, classification and individual, Company, or squad 
practice, or such practice and at such distances as the Regimental Inspectors 
may direct. Reports of the practice will be made by Company command- 
ers immediately to regimental headquarters, and the Regimental Inspector 
of Target Practice will report to the Brigade Inspector of Target Pi 
who will forward same to the Adjutant-General. The reports will show ; 

First. — Number of officers and men in the Company. 

Second. — Number present and practicing. 

Third. — Absentees from praci 

Its of the practice, showing number qualifying in cla 
with average scores, or the record of such other practice as may be held, 
giving any data to determine the result of the firii 

I I 5. 

IV. Tm n the different firings will be as prescribed 
in Wingate's Manual. The si SCription is as foil. 

r ; center. 26 inches 
in diameter ; inner. 40 inches in diameter ; outer get. This tar- 

itanding. 
- in diameter; center. ;,- 
•meter ; in ; outer, | arget 

will be use Dealing ; 400 and 500 

In ma« firing ire the din 

n the 
firing point. 



86 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

Size, 6 x 12 feet ; bull's eye, parallel, 12 inches wide ; center, 6 inches each 
side of the bull's eye ; inner, 6 inches each side of center; outer, rest of 
target. 

For skirmish firing, advance and retreat, the No. 2 target should be used, 
distances from 500 to 200 yards. 

Classification. 

V. The season for classification in target practice will commence on the 
day of the Company practice and end on the 31st day of October in each 
year, and all officers and men (except those who have previously qualified in 
the fourth class), will be required to first practice at 100 yards. Practice in 
the different classes will be conducted as follows : 

4th Class at No. 3 target, 100 yards, standing. 

3d Class at No. 3 target, 200 yards, standing. 

2d Class at No. 2 target, 300 yards, kneeling, and 400 yards lying. 

1st Class at No. 3 target, 200 yards, standing, and No. 2 target, 500 yards, 
lying. 

Each officer and man shall fire five shots at each distance in his class (no 
sighting shots allowed), and after the completion a new classification will be 
made. Those who have made 13 points in five successive shots in the fourth 
class (100 yards), shall be promoted to the third class ; those in the third 
class (200 yards), who have made 13 points shall be promoted to the second 
class (300 and 400 yards) ; those in the second class making a score of 25 
points shall be promoted to the first class (200 and 500 yards) ; and every 
officer and man in the first class making a score of 25 points shali be desig- 
nated marksman, and all in the first class making a score of 40 points shall 
be designated sharpshooters, and each marksman and sharpshooter shall 
receive a badge, which shall be worn whenever the dress uniform is worn, — 
said badge to become the property of the winner. Bars for succeeding 
qualification in each year will be issued to each officer and man, and the 
names of all winners of the State decorations will be published by the Adju- 
tant-General. 

In the first stages of the 1st and 2d classes, thirteen (13) points must be 
made before shooting at the last stage or longer range, and no more than 
two trials will be allowed each man to make a qualifying score for a marks- 
man's or sharpshooter's badge, and each man must stand on his first quali- 
fying score. Any officer or man having previously made qualifying scores 
in the lower classes will not be required to shoot again in such class, but all 
1st class men before again competing in that class must re-qualify in the 2d 
class. 

Qualifying scores for badges must be made on the day and at the time 
designated by the Regimental Commander, and on the Company rifle range, 
and scores made at any other time and place will not be allowed. If for 
any reason the Compan}* range cannot be used, the Regimental Commander 
will designate a range in the district, where the competition shall take place. 

Commandants of Companies must arrange the dates for competition in 
the 1st class with the Regimental Commander, who shall .issue orders for 
the competition, and detail the Regimental Inspector, or a field or staff offi- 



[88 ' ADJU I \\ r-Gl M RA1 *S l:i P< 'I I . 

superintend the competition ind make i return ol the names ol win- 
ners and the qualifying scores to him. 

ssifi< ation, it ed thai .ill 

competitions in the third and fourth cl b, in the i< 

class August )ist, and in the u\-i class Oct 
enlist fune tst. Returns must be made on blank N 

pany command mental headquarters, [uly tst, Septembei tst, and 

mber ist, ol all targ 
At the close of the season, on Octol lication will be made 

1 forwarded it) Regimental Commandant, as 
follow^ 

5th ("lass. — All members not shooting. 

4th Class. — All members practicing and failing at too yards. 

- —All members qualifying at 100 yards, but (ailing at 200 yards. 
— All members qualifying at - but failing at 300 and 400 

5.— All members qualifying at 300 and 400 yards, bul failing at 200 
and 500 yards. 

Marksmen, — All members making 50 per cent, of possible score al 
and 500 yards, having qualified in lower classes. 

— All members making So per cent, of possible score at 200 
and 500 yards, having qualified in lower classes. 

Records must be kept of all practice in the target-practice book, and re- 
>( expenditures of cartridges must be made on blank No. 7, and trans- 
mitted to these headquarters, with the requisition for cartridges. 

VI. Each Company will hereafter be allowed 35 cartridges a year for 
officer and enlisted man who appeared at the previous annual muster, 
and the same number for each recruit after that date, above the total num- 
ber at muster, not over 1,000 to be issued on any one requisition. The same 
allowance of cartridges each man is authorized at Brigade, Regimental, and 
Battalion headquarters, exclusive of band. 

Requisitions for cartridges will be made in duplicate, on the Quartermas- 
ter-General, and forwarded through regimental headquarters. They must 
be accompanied by reports of practice as provided above. Cartridges is- 
sued bv the State must not be used for team practice or competitions, unless 
such use be previously authorized by this office. Commanding officers may 
purchase of the Quartermaster-General ammunition for extra practice by 
members of the National Guard, in lots of not less than 200 rounds. Shells 
will be collected and returned to the Quartermaster-General in 
hundred or more. 

The rral will mak rv arrangements for and 

locate rifle l II be 

provi : 1 requisition duly < «rill be kept in order 

and r- tnd in 

all cases due regard shou 

diturt juired, the 

.Id be referred to ti. I showin| 

md surh t ; in the case. All requi- 



88 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

sitions for ranges, and calls for repairs, should be forwarded through regi- 
mental headquarters. 

VII. Commandants of Companies must not allow rifles to be taken from 
the Armories, nor issue ammunition to members of their commands, except 
for classification in charge of an officer or non-commissioned officer. If any 
member of a Company be assigned to a regimental or brigade team he may, 
with the permission of his Company commandant, take and retain his rifle 
for private practice while he is a member of said team, but such retention 
carries with it no right to use the ammunition issued by the State, nor re- 
lieves the Captain of responsibility if the rifle is lost. 

VIII. The Companies of the Fifth Battalion are, for the purpose of re- 
ceiving instruction in target practice, placed in charge of the Inspector of 
Target Practice of the Regiment in whose district the Company is located. 

IX. The Brigade and Regimental Inspectors of Target Practice will use 
the following as the basis for computing the figure of merit of Companies 
in classification in target practice. 

Figure of Merit. 

Classes. 
Sharpshooters, 80 per cent., 
Marksmen, 50 per cent., 
1st Class (qualifying at 300 and 400), 
2d Class (qualifying at 200), 
3d Class (qualifying at 100), 
4th Class (failing at 100), 
5th Class (absentees), 

60 3,870 
3,870 divided by 60 — 64.50, Figure of Merit. 

X. Regimental and Company commanders are charged with the carrying 
out of target practice in their respective commands, in accordance with this 
order and Wingate's Manual of rifle practice, and all orders heretofore issu- 
ed for the conducting of target practice are hereby revoked. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEORGE M. HARMON, 

A djutant- Genera I. 



Ratings 
ach Class. 


No. in 

Each Class 

Oct. 31st. 


IOO 


X 


TO = I 


,000 


80 
60 


X 
X 


30 = 2 

3 = 


,400 
180 


40 


X 


4 = 


160 


20 


X 


2 = 


40 


IO 


X 


9 = 


90 


O 


X 


2 = 






STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

General Orders, ) Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 8. \ Hartford, June 20, 1881. 

I. The following report of Captain Tully McCrea, 1st Artillery, Brevet 
Major U. S. Army, of his muster and inspection of the Connecticut National 
Guard, in compliance with the request of the commander-in-chief, and orders 
of the War Department, U. S. A., is published for the information of all 
concerned : 

Note. — See report, pages 46 to 54 herewith. 



[88 Ai>jr i a\ r-Gl \i R \i *S R1 POR 1. 

II. in,- following - having fallen below propel standard oi effi- 

iheii reiention in n hereby disban led 

::.. at, R tckville. 
neni, Wii ks. 

nent, Putnam, 
pan] C, Fourth Regiment, Stamford. 
I), Fifth Battalion, Norwich. 

Dta rill be issued from this office a** soon si 

led t.> the last commanding office i oi each company, foi distri- 
bute 

I 

mplete !u> term <>t enlistment 
cation to this office before July isi for such transfer, the applica- 
tion t< rarded through the commanding officer <>i < otn\ 
approval. 

The Quartern I ral will t.tke immediate charge of the State prop- 

erty of the companies disbanded. All records, books, blanks, etc.. will be 
forwarded t>> th 

\ anies will be accepted foi the National Guard during the 

nt year. 

III. Companies receiving less than fifty per cent, of total credits, are 
cautioned .md are informed that the law in regard to disbandment of 

inefficient companies will be enforced unless there is a decided improve- 
ment. 

IV. The attention of all officers of the National Guard is especially called 
to that portion of Major McCrea's report in regard to discipline, knowledge 
of, and study o! tactics. The study of tactics was strongly urged by Lieut. - 
Colonel Roger Jones, [' . S. A., in his report regarding the encampment of 

i. i>So, and by General Orders, No. 9, A. G. O., series of 1880, and to 
give emphasis to these recommendations all officers rated by the Inspector 

Mir 121, will be liable to be called before a Hoard of Examiners at the 
next encampment. 

V. The thanks of the Commander-in-Chief are extended to Major Mc- 
for his able, impartial, and thorough inspection of the National Guard. 
>od effects of the inspection are already evident, and will undoubtedly 

be lasting. The duty was not a pleasant one, but it was performed in such 
an impartial manner that the Major leaves many friends in the Connecticut 
National Guard. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

Adjutant-Gnt 



SI All. Oi" I IKTT. 

A 

9. //</ t88i. 

I. tertnaster-General will issue to each company of the National 

Guard 500 ball cam ed. to replace the < 

12 



90 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

boxes of 300 each issued in 1877 and 1878. As soon as the above-ordered 
cartridges are received, commandants of companies are authorized to expend, 
in target practice, the 300 ball cartridges in sealed boxes, preference being 
given to volley and file firing. The cartridges will not be charged as a part 
of the annual allowance. 

II. The cartridges furnished under this order will be stored in the com- 
pany armory, and the seals on said boxes must not be broken or the car- 
tridges used except the company is called upon to suppress riot, repel inva- 
sion, or to act as aid to the civil authority. Commandants of companies will 
be held individually responsible for the safe-keeping, for the purposes speci- 
fied, of cartridges issued under this order, and will report immediately to 
this office any expenditures made in case of public necessity. The Quarter- 
master-General will see that these cartridges are inspected yearly, and report 
any violation of this Order. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

Adjutant- General. 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

General Orders, ) Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 10. ) Hartford, August 23, 1881. 

I. Colonel Lucius A. Barbour, 1st Regiment C. N. G.. Major Tully Mc- 
Crea, 1st U. S. Artillery, and Major William H. Stowe, are hereby appointed 
an Examining Board for the examination in military tactics of Officers of the 
Connecticut National Guard, and will convene at the Brigade Encampment 
at Niantic, on Wednesday, the 7th day of September, 1881, at 9 o'clock, a. m. 
Each officer appearing before the Board will be examined in the tactics re- 
quired for the proper performance of the duties of his position, and return 
will be made to this office giving name and rank of each officer examined, 
and the result of the examination. The Board will also examine all officers 
ordered before it as to their general knowledge of military duties outside of 
tactics, and will make a special report of such examination. 

II. The following-named officers are ordered to appear before said Board 
for examination : the officers of the First Regiment and Fifth Battalion on 
Wednesday, September 7th, and the other officers at the call of the Board. 

Second Platoon Artillery. 
1st Lieut. Holcomb N. Jones. 2d Lieut. Reuben H. W. Kelsey. 

First Regiment. 

Captain George A. Cornell. 2d Lieut. William E. Allen. 

1 st Lieut. Henry Simon, Jr. 2d Lieut. John W. Crane. 

Second Regiment. 

Major Charles R. Bannon. 2d Lieut. Patrick F. Bannon. 

Capt. and Adj't Joseph T. Elliott. 2d Lieut. Frederick T. Ward. 



\i>ir r \\ i -< ;ener ^l's rep< >r i . ,i 

itt Lieut. James Horigan. ad Lieut. D \ Hi 

ist Lieut. 1 • ■ i i ii O. Sh \i i k. ad Lieut. John Gi it. 

out. William Kakhrlb. 



Third Regiment. 

William H. Brntlry. isi Lieut William M. Mason. 

• mi M\ k.'n P. Sqi ii tsi Lieut. Charles S. Ebbrrts. 

Captain William F, Bidwrll. isi Lieut. Charlrs W. Harrington. 

Captain Si i w in K. Ri >wr. 2d Lieut. Ch \ki i - F. Ch \ni.y. 

tain Fr \\k s. l-'ou 1 1 a. 2d Lieut. Wili i \m W. Cronin. 

in Frrdrrk k E. St, Ci urr. 2d Lieut. Charlrs II. Gilbert. 

ist Lieut. Daniri G.Arnold. ad Lieut. Carlili P. Boynton. 

isi Lieut. J IMRS HAGGRRTY. 

Fourth Regiment. 

Jamrs C Crowe. ist Lieut. James Donnelly. 

n Edward F. Jennings. 2d Lieut. John J. Glrnnon. 

Captain J \mi - Sheridan. 2d Lieut. Wili i \m F. W irdwei i . 

tain Edward Finn. 2d Lieut. George W. Whei i 

ISt Lieut. \\\ \\ A. II \i SCHILDT. 2d Lieut. Hakyky M. KrNT. 



Fifth Battalion. 

Major Frank M. Weli ii. 
W. Ladieu. ist Lieut. William R. Keyes. 

2d Lieut. Fi 1 11 WOOD C. Am KONY. 

III. The ( hiartermaster-General will provide an office for the Hoard, and 
tli-- Paymasl tl will pay the officers of the First Regiment and the 

Fifth Battalion, repenting for examination, their transportation and per diem 
of pay and allowance BS provided by law for regular duty. 
irder of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON. 

Adjutant- General. 



-I VI E or < o\\l.< [|< it. 

1 , 
n. I Hartford* Angnst 24, 1S81. 

I. At th I 'olonel II. B. ('lit/, I<>th 

Infantry, ha> been 1 the Ariuv to be 

the encampment 

Tin- Briga >mmanding will give every opportunitj to C< 

Clifl to witness the drills, duties, and ceremonies connected with the v\. 
ment and such insp- to make. 



92 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

The General of the Army has also been invited to attend the encampment 
and it is probable that he may review the troops at the camp or at New 
London. 

II. The encampments of the National Guard are held under authority of 
law, for purpose of instruction of its members in camp and field duties, and 
it is expected and required that every officer and enlisted man will be present 
in camp and perform his whole tour of duty. 

The Brigadier-General is directed to see that all enlisted men absent from 
camp without leave, or satisfactory excuse to him, are properly notified of 
fines incurred, and the fines collected. Excuses of an imperative nature only 
should be granted, the same as for actual service. The fine for absence from 
camp without leave or satisfactory excuse is five dollars for each day of ab- 
sence (an absence from any one of the three daily roll calls is deemed as 
absence for thi entire day), and for any unsoldierly conduct or disobedience 
to orders not more than ten dollars. Commissioned Officers absent from 
camp will be reported to this office by the General commanding, with any 
facts regarding the cause of absence. 

The General commanding will also cause a muster to be made each day 
of the encampment by the Regimental Paymasters, who will be held account- 
able for the absolute correctness of their musters. Excuses for absence on 
pass or guard duty must be verified in each case at Brigade headquarters. 
The muster rolls will be forwarded to this office at close of the encampment. 

III. The Brigadier-General is authorized to participate with his command 
in the one hundredth anniversary of the Battle of Groton Heights, Tuesday, 
September 6, 1881. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

Adjutant- General. 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

General Orders, / Adjutant General's Office, 

No. 12. f Hartford, September 22, 18.81. 

I. With profound sorrow the Commander-in-Chief announces to the Na- 
tional Guard the death, on the 19th instant, of James A. Garfield, President 
of the United States. 

The National Guard of Connecticut will share with the citizens of the 
country the feelings of grief inspired by the death of the honored and beloved 
President, and will mourn his death as a National calamity. 

II. As a mark of respect to the deceased President the officers of the Na- 
tional Guard, on all occasions of parade or ceremony during the ensuing 
six months, will wear crape on the left arm and sword hilt, and all regimen- 
tal colors will be furled and draped with crape during that time. 

By order of the. Commander in chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

Adjutant-General. 



\|.|C I \\ l GENER \l 'S Rl POR I. 

man 01 C0NNE4 I K i l 

a i General's Offi 

\ i ; I //<///' / I. l88l. 

I. ! mcc with the provisions <>t Section 9, Chapter I, Title X. ol 

tutes, tin. follow ointed Post-Surgeons, to 

determine exemptions from military duty bj the standard ol disability pre- 
ed by tin- Surgeon-General. 
//./' .'1.— Kli Warner, Hani New Britain; 

Edward F. Parsons, Enfield; LP » ; Henry C. Bunce, 

Glastonbury !'. Lewis, Canton ; G. W. Ed wards, Granby ; Henry E. 

Way, Bristol; Charles Carrington, Farmington ; Marcus L. Fish, Easi 
Windsoi ; Lilian N. Parker, Manchester. 

■\v. R. Bartlett, New Haven; Alfred North, Water- 
bury ; N. Nickerson, Meriden ; 1 B tardsley, Deri \ . W. II. Andrews, 
Mil ford ; G. P. Reynolds, Guilford ; J. I). McGaughey, Wallingford ; ( . W. 
>rd, Bmnford ; W. < '. Williams, Cheshire; S. C, Johnson, Seymour. 

nty. — Francis I). Edgerton, Middletown ; John H. Grannis, 
k ; M. C. Hazen, Haddam ; Nathaniel 0. Harris. East II addam ; 
Charles H. Hubbard, Essex ; Edwin Hidwell, Saybrook ; S. E. Peck, (Clinton ; 
unty. — Francis N. Braman, New London; S. L. Sprague, Nor- 
wich ; E. Frank Coates, Stonington ; Seth L. Chase, Colchester, Geor^< W. 
Harris. Old Lyme ; M. K. Brew ie ; William Soule, Griswold. 

Win unty. — William A. Lewis, Plainfield ; John B. Kent, Putnam ; 

ton Hills, Windham ; A. S. Leonard, Woodstock ; Samuel Hutchings, 
Killingly ; Lowell Holbrook, Thompson. 

Tolland County. — S. G. Risley, Rockville ; C. B. Newton, Stafford Springs; 
Henry v . D th Coventry ; Frederick Johnson, Mansfield. 

Fair G -• 1". Lew >rt ; Wm, C. Burke, Jr., Nor- 

walk; Willi nbury ; Henry Hungerford, Stamford , William 

C. Wi . Greenwich ; Will 

field ; William G. Brdwnson, \ tn : Frank Powers, West port. 

Lite h. Litchfield; Bradford S. Thorn] 

Salisbury ; James Hine, New Milfoi Winsted ; Henry 

S. Kassman, Woodbury; I wall; William Woodruff. 

Thomaston. 

II. All 1 tweea 18 and i- years of age, desiring < ir<»m 
military duty and commutation tax, b) reason of mental or physical dis- 
ability, must imination, and if 
found . .11 be furnished with a <'ertiti tion, t<> b< 

bv them with ih< rown where ihey are liable to enrollment. 

- - 

I 
November i 

M. Persons not filing t ; . 

• ion lor the 



94 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

III. Post-Surgeons are required to make exemptions strictly in accord- 
ance with the orders of the Surgeon-General, and will on the ist of January 
report to him the names of all exempted by them, with town and disability, 
and the names of all examined and not exempted. The fee for examination 
will be paid by this office upon the report made by the Surgeon-General. 

Blanks for Certificates of Exemption and Reports to Surgeon-General will 
be supplied from this office. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

Adjutant- General. 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

General Orders, / Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 14. f Hartford, October?,, t88i. 

Permission is hereby accorded to all militia organizations of other States 
to enter and pass through this State, armed and equipped as military bodies, 
going to and returning from the Centennial Celebration of the surrender of 
Lord Cornwallis, at Yorktown, Va. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

A dju ta n t- Gen era I. 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

General Order, \ Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 15. f Hartford, A r ove??iber 5, 188 1. 

I. The Brigadier-General commanding will issue orders for a muster of 
the Connecticut National Guard the last week in November, the Regiments 
and Battalions being mustered by their commanding officers and the Artil- 
lery by Lieutenant Lee commanding First Platoon Artillery. The musters 
will take place in the evening, and the attention of commanding officers is 
called to Chapt. LIV. Public Acts General Assembly, A. D. 1881, regarding 
fine for non-attendance at muster (see G. O. No. 5, of May 2d, 1881). 

II. Commanding officers will have duplicate muster rolls properly made 
out, previous to date of muster, and will see that all recruits are examined 
by the Surgeon and their enlistment papers forwarded to this office at or 
before muster. The rolls must account for every commissioned officer and 
enlisted man whose name appeared on the last muster roll of the command, 
and those who have joined the organization since that date, and will give all 
the information provided for bv the muster blanks. 

III. The mustering officer will scrutinize the rolls caiefully, and see that 
they are properly filled as required; he will also see that all members not 
present at muster are duly notified of fines incurred. No member will be 
mustered as present unless in uniform and in the ranks. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

Adjutant- General. 






AMI l'.W I -".I M R \1 '- I-l I « '!: I. 






STATE OF CONNEC I 1CUT. 



RA1 Oki: 

\ 



Adjutant-G ' ICE, 

//.:■ J. 1881. 



I. The following named officers oi the Connecticut National G 
having passed a satisfactory examination in military tactics, will be com- 
>ned with rank and date, as given herewith : 



PLATO( IN \K I !l I.I KN . 



First Lt. Holcomb N. 1 
Second Lt. Reuben H. W. Kelsey 



Clinton, 

Clinton, 



D< 



1880. 
1880. 



II KM REGIMENT. 



Captain George A. Cornell, 
First Lt. Henry Simon, Jr., 
Second Lt. William E. Allen, 
Second Lt. John W. Crane, 



Co. H, Hartford. 
Co. H, Hartford, 
Co. D. New Britain, 
Co. H. Hartford, 



Dec. 3. 1880. 

Dec. 3, 1880. 

April 5, 1881. 

July 26, 1881. 



SECOND REGIMENT. 



Major 
Captain 
Captain 
First Lt. 
First Lt. 
First Lt. 

d Lt. 
Second Lt. 
Second Lt. 
Second Lt. 
Second Lt. 
Second Lt. 



Major 

iin 
Captain 
Captain 
Captain 
Lt. 
First Lt. 

Lt. 
Ffrst Lt. 
First Lt. 
Second Lt. 
Second Lt. 

nd Lt. 
Second Lt. 

rid Lt. 



Charles R. Bannon, 






Waterbury, 


Aug. 


15. 


1881. 


Walter J. Leavenworth, 


Co. 


K. 


Wallingford, 


Nov. 


11, 


1880. 


Joseph T. Elliott. Adjutant, 


Middletown, 


Mar. 


21, 


1881. 


James Horigan, 


Co. 


G, 


Waterbury, 


Dec. 


I, 


1880. 


Everett < ). Shaler, 


Co. 


II. 


Metown, 


July 


29. 


1S81. 


William Kaehrle, 


Co. 


B, 


New Haven, 


Aug. 


IO, 


1881. 


William Kaehrle, 


Co. 


B, 


New Haven. 


Aug. 


II. 


1880. 


Patrick F. Bannon, 


Co. 


G, 


Waterbury, 


Dec. 


I, 


1880. 


Frederick T. Ward, 


Co. 


I, 


Meriden, 


April 


14. 


1881. 


Everett O. Shaler, 


Co. 


H. 


Middletown, 


April 


19. 


1881. 


David A. Hutchings, 


Co. 


II. 


Middletown, 


July 


29. 


1881. 


John Gutt, 


Co. 


B, 


New Haven, 


Aug. 


10, 


1881. 


THIRD 


BEGIM1 








William H. Bentley. 






London, 


July 


M. 


1881. 


Myron P. Squires, 


Co. 


K, 


Willimantic, 


Sept. 


24. 


1880. 


Selwin E. R 


Co. 


G, 


Putnam, 


M.ir. 


IS, 


1881. 


Frank S. Fowler, 


Co. 


E, 


Willimantic, 


July 


8. 


1881. 


Frederick E. St. < Iaire, 


Co. 


I), 


New London, 


Aug. 


1, 


1881. 


Daniel G. Arnold, 


Co. 




Putnam, 


Mar. 


iS, 


1881. 


James Haggerty, 


Co. 




Willimantic, 


July 


8, 


1881. 


William M. Mason, 




I). 


London, 




1, 


1881. 


Charles S. Ebb' 


Co. 


C, 


ich, 




2. 




Charles W. H.u ring ton, 


1 


K. 


Willimantic. 


Aug. 


1 1. 


1881. 


■ s F. Cbaney, 




I. 


London, 




9. 


1880. 


Charl( 










19. 


1881. 


Willi, >nin, 


1 


I). 






1. 




Charles I i 






ich, 






1881. 


■ Boynton, 




K 


Wil lima i.- 




1 1, 





g6 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

FOURTH REGIMENT. 

Major James C. Crowe, So. Norwalk, 

Captain Edward F. Jennings, Co. D, So. Norwalk, 

Captain James Sheridan, Co. E, Bridgeport, 

Captain Edward Finn, Co. I, Winsted, 

First Lt. Alvan A. Hauschildt, Co. D, So. Norwalk, 

First Lt. James Donnelly, Co. E, Bridgeport, 

Second Lt. John J. Glennon, Co. E, Bridgeport, 

Second Lt. William F. Ward well, Co. D, Norwalk, 

Second Lt. George W. Wheeler, Co. A, Bethel. 

Second Lt. Harvey M. Kent, Co. F, Norwalk, 

FIFTH BATTALION. 

Major Frank M. Welch, Bridgeport, 

Captain George W. Ladieu, Co. A, New Haven, 

First Lt. William R. Keyes, Co. A, New Haven, 

Second Lt. William R. Keyes, Co. A, New Haven, 

Second Lt. Fleetwood C. Anthony, Co. A, New Haven, 

II. The following named officers of the Connecticut National Guard, not 
being required to pass an examination in military tactics, will be commis- 
sioned with date and rank as given herewith : 

BRIGADE STAFF. 

Captain Edwin McNeil, Aid-de-Camp, Litchfield, Dec. 21, 1880. 

FOURTH REGIMENT. 

Chaplain Samuel Scoville, Stamford, Mar. 19, 1881. 

FIFTH BATTALION. 

First Lt. Wm. P. H. Cross, Quartermaster, Hartford, Sept. 15, 1881. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief: 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

Adjutant-General. 



Aug. 18, 


1880. 


Sept. 17, 


1880. 


Dec. 31, 


1880. 


May 20, 


1881. 


Sept. 17, 


1880. 


Dec. 31, 


1880. 


Mar. 25, 


1SS1. 


April 15, 


1881. 


May 10, 


1881. 


July 15, 


1881. 


Aug. 11, 


1881. 


April 26, 


1881. 


April 26, 


1881. 


Dec. 10, 


1880. 


April 26, 


1881. 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 

General Orders, \ Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 17. j" Hartford, November 28, 1881. 

Under the provisions of Chapter CXLII of the General Assembly, State 
of Connecticut, approved April 14, 1881, the two platoons of Artillery, Con- 
necticut National Guard, will be consolidated, and designated as Battery 
"A," the First Platoon being located in Guilford, and the Second Platoon in 
Clinton. The Battery will consist of a Captain, two First Lieutenants, two 
Second Lieutenants, one First Sergeant, one Quartermaster-Sergeant, one 



[882.] ahhtw : \i *S REPORT. 97 

Veterinary Sergeant, four Sergeants, eight Corporals, two Trumpeters, one 
Guidon, not more than sixty-four not less than thirty-two Privates, l 
platoon there will be one First Lieutenant, one Second Lieutenant, two - s <i- 
geants, foui Corporals, and noi more than thirty-two Privates. 

The present commissioned officers ol the artillery are re-appointed In 
Battery A. .1^ t illows ; Lieutenant Wm. II. Lee to be Captain; Lieutenant 
Wm. T. Foote, Second Lieutenant First Platoon; Lieutenant Holcomb N. 
[ones, First Lieutenant Second Platoon; Lieutenant Reuben II. W. K 
Second Lieutenam Second Platoon. 

Captain Wm. H. Lee will assemble the members <>f the First Platoon, 
giving notice in accordance with the law, for the nomination of a First Lieu- 
tenant, and to till any vacancy caused by such nomination; and will make 
return of the result of the nomination so made to this office without delay. 

Hereafter the Captain of the Battery will be nominated by the Lieutenants, 

and the Lieutenants by the members of their respective platoons. The non- 
commissioned officers will be appointed and warranted by the Captain; the 
nits, Corporals and Trumpeters of each platoon being nominated by 
the First Lieutenants thereof. 

The First Lieutenant of each platoon will give bonds and be responsible 
itc property issued to his platoon, the same in all respects as a Captain 
of Infantry. 

The Captain of the Battery will have full command at all times, and will 
-ible for all property not covered by the First Lieutenants. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON. 

Adjutant-General. 



IMPORTANT SPECIAL OEDEES 



ATE OF CONNECTICUT. 
\i Ordbi Adjutant-General's Office, 

4- I Hartford, January iS, l88l. 

Major James E. Stetson, Brigade Inspector 0/ Target Practice, Captain 
L. Woodbridge, Inspector of Target Practice, rst Regiment, and 
tain Samuel C. Kingman, Inspector of Target Practice, 4th Regiment, arr 

appointed a Board to examine sights tor military rifles, and report to 
this office by February 15, iSSr, what change, if any, is needed in the 
of the breech-loading ritles now used by the National Guard. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

(.To. M. HAKMo.N, 
Adjutant- 
13 



98 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

Special Orders, ) 

No. 6. ) Hartford, February I, 1881. 

Special Orders, No. 7, series of 1879, regarding Armory instruction by- 
Inspectors of Target Practice, is hereby revoked. 
. By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

A djutant- General. 



Special Orders, 

No. 16. j" Hartford, February 25, 1 88 1. 

The following named officers are hereby constituted a Board for the 
purpose of drafting a code of regulations for the guidance and government 
of the Connecticut National Guard under existing laws. They will also 
recommend such changes in the Militia law as they deem necessary to sim- 
plify or improve the same. Brigadier-General Stephen R. Smith, C. N. G., 
Colonel William H. Tubbs, 3d Regiment, Colonel Lucius A. Barbour, 1st 
Regiment, Colonel Charles P. Graham, 2d Regiment, Colonel George L. 
Crofut, 4th Regiment, Lieut. Colonel Simeon J. Fox, Asst. Adjt.-Genl., 
Lieut. Colonel Lewis L. Morgan, Brig. Adjt. 
The necessary expenses of the members of the Board will be allowed. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

A djutant- Genera I. 



Special Orders, 

No. 17. f, Hartford, February 25, 1881. 

The Quartermaster-General will issue on approved requisition to the 
Commandants of the First and Second Regiments, C. N. G., a Gatling Gun. 
The said commandants will detail the required number of officers and 
men to serve as an Artillery detachment and take charge of said guns. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

A djutant- General. 



Special Orders, ) 

No. 36. j" Hartford, April 23, 1881. 

I. Major James E. Stetson, Brigade Inspector of Target Practice, will 
assemble the Regimental Inspectors of Target Practice at such place as he 
may designate for conference in regard to the target practice as ordered 
for May. 

II. The necessary expenses of the officers will be allowed and paid by 
the Paymaster-General. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

SIMEON J. FOX, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 



2.] ADJUTANT-GEN! RA1 'S Rl r- 99 

u Ordi 

41. I April 30, 1 88 1. 

Commandants of Regiments and Battalions arc authorized i" attend tlie 
M.iv Inspections and parades <>t their commands, and will be allowed nec- 
ezpenses u> be paid by the Paymaster-General. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief. 

Gl O. M. HARMON. 

Adjutant-General. 



\ . 54. I 31, 1881. 

nel William H. Tubbs, 3d Regiment, Colonel George L. Crofut, 4th 
Regiment. Major Arthur L. Goodrich, 1st Regiment, Captain Abner N. 
Sterry, 3d Regiment, and Lieut. Samuel O. Prentice, 1st Regiment, are ap- 
pointed a military Board of Examiners, to inquire and report whether there 
has been any impropriety of conduct on the part of Lieutenant Colonel 
Josiah N. Bacon, 2d Regiment, C. N. G., and also whether he has been 
guilty of any attempt to embarrass the administration of the affairs of the 
Regiment, by improper influences upon the officers and men, or otherwise. 
Judge-Advocate, H. Lynde Harrison, will conduct the inquiry before the 
board as in cases of courts martial. 

Colonel Tubbs will convene the board at as early a date as may be prac- 
ticable. 

By order of the Commander in Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

Adjutan t- General. 



\l Orders, , 
No. 57. [ June 15, 1SS1. 

The Pavmasters of the National Guard, in whose districts the companies 
of the Fifth Battalion and the Platoons of Artillery are located, will make 
all payment* to said organizations as prescribed by Chapter LIII, Public 
Acts of [881. The Paymaster of the Second Regiment will in like manner 
make payments to Field and Staff officers of the Fifth Battalion. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON. 

A djutan t- General. 



No. 60. June 25, 1 88 1. 

I. In accordance with the provisions of Chapter XXXII, Geners 
tutes. approved M i83i. Sin. t Adjutant-General, 

will be commissioned with rank of Colonel, and ! 

ant Adjutant-General, with rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, both to dat- 
58i. 



ioo adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

II. John A. Tibbits of New London is hereby appointed Judge Advocate, 
Third regimental district, with rank of Major, from June i, 1881, and will 
be commissioned accordingly. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

Adjutant-General. 



Special Orders, ) 

No. 63. J Hartford, June 29, 1881. 

I. Colonel William H. Tubbs, Third Regiment, C. N. G., is, at his urgent 
request, relieved from duty as a member of the Military Board of Examiners 
appointed by Special Orders, No. 54, C. S. 

II. Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Skinner, Fourth Regiment, C. N. G., is 
hereby appointed a member of the Military Board of Examiners convened 
by Special Orders, No. 54, C. S., in place of Colonel William H. Tubbs, 
relieved. Lieutenant-Colonel Skinner will report at the next meeting of 
the Board, July 6th, at the State Capitol, Hartford. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

Adjutant- General. 



Special Orders, 

No. 68. f Hartford, July 14, 1881. 

Colonel Charles L. Upham of Meriden, Major William H. Stowe of New 
Haven, and Captain Henry C. Dwight of Hartford, are appointed a Board of 
Survey, to examine the military and other property in the State Arsenal, and 
recommend for public sale such portion as they may condemn as unneces- 
sary and unserviceable. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

A dju ta n t- Gen era I. 



Special Orders, ) 

No. 71. , J Hartford, July 18, 188 1. 

Whereas, the military board appointed by Special Orders, No. 54, dated 
May 31, 1881, A. G. O., were requested by the Commander-in-Chief at its 
first meeting to fully investigate the causes of alleged difficulties in the 
Second Regiment, Connecticut National Guard, and to report the names of 
any persons connected with the National Guard who have caused such diffi- 
culties, if any exist, and 

Whereas, in accordance with such request said board has so conducted 
the investigation, therefore, in addition to the duties and powers conferred by 
Special Orders, No. 54, C. S., Colonel George L. Crofut, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Henry Skinner, Major Arthur L. Goodrich, Captain Abner N. Sterry, and 
Lieutenant Samuel O. Prentice are appointed a Court of Inquiry with power 
to inquire and report whether there are any difficulties in the Second Regi- 
ment, C. N. G., affecting its efficiency, discipline, or the administration of its 



iSS2.| ami tw r-G1 M RAJ *S RE] I >RT. I i 

and it so, wh.it are the caueei oi the same, and what persona, ii :mv, 
sponsible. 
fudge Advocate Lynda Harrison will conduci the enquiry undei this 
order. 

oftbia Court will assemble .it the Armory oi Com pan] 
l Regiment, C, N. G., New Haven, on Thursday, July sist, i88z, af 
eleven o'clock a. m. 

By order ol the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

utont-GetUral. 



w Ordi I 
No. 74. * Hartford, July 20, 1881. 

The Brigadier-General commanding Connecticut National Guard is 
authorized to organize a Signal Corps by detail from members ol the National 
Guard, to consist of such number and under such officers as he may deter- 
mine. 

The Quartermaster-General will issue to the Brigadier-General, on ap- 
proved requisition, two sets of signal equipments. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

Adjutant-General. 



vi. Ordf.! 

76. I Hartford, July 26, 1881. 

The Quartermaster-General is directed to relieve commanding officers of 
the National Guard of all responsibility for marksmen's badges and bars 
which have been charged to them on the books of his department. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON. 

Adjutant-General. 

N 77. J Hartford, July 27, 1881. 

Quartern r.il is directed to secure a camp ground at Nian- 

tic for the encampment ol the Second, Third and Fourth Regiments and the 
Artillery, I mmencing S r 5, 1SS1. He will 

• 29th. with the ramp equipage required by the Bri. 
!. lay out the camp under his direction and pitch the officers' touts 
ill allow, 
ivided for tin- Commander-in-Chief and Staff, any 

office: ieral of the Army to attend the encampment, and 

members of the Examining Board. 

The Adjutant and Quart a ill attend 

the - at. 

of the Comma 

0. M. HARM" 'V 



102 adjutant-general's report. [Jan., 

Special Orders, ) 

No. 78. f Hartford, July 28, 1881. 

The Quartermaster-General will issue to the companies of the Fifth Bat- 
talion, C. N. G., the Peabody rifles, calibre .45, in place of the Springfield 
rifles, calibre .50. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

A djutant- General. 



Special Orders, ) 

No. 82. ) August 4, 1881. 

The Commission appointed by Special Orders, No. 68, C. S., to examine 
property in the State Arsenal, having recommended that certain articles 
therein be disposed of, Brigadier-General Alexander Harbison, Quarter- 
master-General, is hereby ordered to dispose of said property to the highest 
bidder, for cash, and make return to this office of the amount received 
therefrom. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

SIMEON J. FOX. 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Special Orders, ) 

No. 85. J August 4,1881. 

The Staff of the Commander-in-Chief will report at Niantic, Monday, 
September 6th, at 7 p. m., for duty with the Commander-in-Chief, until Fri- 
day, September 9th. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

A dju tant- General. 



Special Orders, \ 

No. 98. \ September I, 1 88 1. 

Commandants of Regiments and Inspectors of Target Practice are di- 
rected to see that all soldiers shooting for the Marksmen's or Sharpshooters' 
Badges, have been duly qualified this year, in accordance with requirements 
of General Orders No. 7, C. S. 

No soldier must be reported as a winner of a Badge unless he has qual- 
ified in all classes, in the manner and at the time required by the Order. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief. 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

A dju la nt-Gen era I. 



Special Orders, ) 

No. 102. ) September 22, 1881. 

The Quartermaster-General will, on Monday, September 26th, the day of 
the final obsequies of the late lamented President, James A. Garfield, cause 



[882.] adjutant-general's report. 103 

a sal uii- tobc fired on the Capitol Park, ol thirteen gum at ranrise, one k 1 " 1 
half houi during the day, and thirty-eight gum at luntet. 
By ordei <>t the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

■it.uit-dtneral. 



w Ordj 

No. 107. I October 10, 188 1. 

I. 'Flu- Ezamiuing Ho. ml appointed t>v General Orders No. 10, C, s 
nil I convene at this office on Monday, Octobei 31, 1881, at 10 o'clock a.m.. 
for the examination in military tactics ol such officers as may appear before it. 

II. The following named officers having presented satisfactory excuses 
for not appearing before the Examining Hoard at its first session, or on 
recommendation of the Hoard that they have a further examination before 
final action, will appeal for examination in military tactics at the time and 
place given above, viz ; 

Major Frank M. Welch, 5th Battalion. 

tain William F. Bid well, 3"d Regiment. 
Captain Selwin E. Rowe, 3d Regiment. 
Captain Frank S. Fowler, 3d Regiment. 

tain George W. Ladieu, 5th Battalion. 
1st Lieut. James Horigan, 2d Regiment. 
1st Lieut. William M. Mason, 3d Regiment. 
2d Lieut. John W. Crane, 1st Regiment. 
2d Lieut. George W. Wheeler, 4th Regiment 

Officers appearing at this second session of the Board will not be allowed 
pay and expenses. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

mtanUGtturaL 



\\. ORUF.i 

\ 108. v October 8, 1881. 

First Lieutenant Levi H. Hotchkiss, Company F, 1st Regiment Connecti- 
cut National Guard, will report to the Ouartermaster-General for duty as 
Acting Assistant yuartermaster-General. 

Hv order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON 

.-/ Jju tan t- General. 

S, I 
Ho. no. October 14, 1881. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Henry ( M Quartermaster-General is 

hereby appointed Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON 

ral. 



104 • adjutant-general's report. [Jan. 

Special Orders, ] 

No. Hi. ) x November II, 1880. 

Special orders No. 108 and no, which respectively appointed 1st Lieuten- 
ant Levi H. Hotchkiss, Co. F, 1st Reg't C. N. G., as Acting Assistant Quar- 
termaster-General, and Lieutenant-Colonel Henry C. Morgan, Assistant 
Quartermaster-General as Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, are hereby 
revoked. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

A djutant- General. 



Special Orders, ) 

No. 114. f I November 14, 1S81. 

In issuing orders for muster of the National Guard, in accordance with 
General Orders No. 15 C. S., the Brigadier-General is directed to extend the 
time for muster to the last ten days in November. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

GEO. M. HARMON, 

A dju ta n I- Gen era I. 



Special Orders, ) 

No. 116. ) November 16, 1881. 

I. The resignation of Colonel Rutherford Trowbridge, A. D. C, on the 
Staff of the Commander-in-Chief, is hereby accepted, and he is honorably 
discharged from the military service of the State. 

II. Frank L. Bigelow, of New Haven, is hereby appointed Aid-de-Camp, 
with rank of Colonel, on the Staff of the Commander-in-Chief, to date from 
November 5. 1881, vice Trowbridge, resigned. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

SIMEON J. FOX, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 



f 



FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



<»K TIIK 



STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 



OP THE 



State of Connecticut, 



roil THE 



Fiscal Year Ending November 30, 1881 



|)riitittr bg #rbtr of % Jegislaiur*. 



HABTFOBD, (ONX. 

PRESS OF THE CASE, LOCKWOUD A BKAINAKD COMI'AHl. 

180L 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 



Term expiree 

Jomt S. Butler. M.P.. Hartford, President, 1886 

Hon. A. C. Lippitt. New London, 

Prof. C. A. Lindslky. M.D. New Haven, L884 

Prof. W. H. Brewer, New H.v 1884 

Hon. A. E. Burr, Hartford, 

Robert Hubbard, M.D., Bridgeport, 1882 

C. W. Chamberlain. M.I). Hartford, Secretary. 



State of Connecticut, 



Office of the State Board of Health, 

State House, Hartford, Dec, 1881. 

'/■• Hit Excellency, H. B. Bigelow, 

ernor of the State of Connecticut. 

Sir: In compliance with the laws of this State, I have the 
honor to present to you the report of the State Board of Health 
for the year ending Nov. 30, 1881. 
Very respectfully, 

C. W. CHAMBERLAIN, M.D., 
Secretary of the Connecticut State Board of Health. 



v 



CONTENTS. 



PAOS. 

General Report, - - 1 

Meeting of the American Public Health Association, - - 81 

:y's Report, ------ 60 

Sewerage of Stamford, - - - - - 39 

Drainage of New Milford, ----- 70 

Scarlet fever at Poquonnoc, - - - - 78 

Ti:i:as[i;i;u'> Report, ------ 99 

nation. Prof. C. A. Lindsley, M.D., - 103 

ria in Connecticut, C. W. Chamberlain, M.D., - 134 

Malaria in Western Connecticut, by Gen. E. S. Viele, - - 887 
Natural History of the Trichinous Infection in Man and Animals, 

Noah Creaeey, M.I)., V.S., Ph.D., - 846 

Sanitary L ------- 261 

Proposed Laws, ------- 288 

Registration Law*, ------ 279 

Registration Report. 



INDEX. 



PAOE 

Additions to Library, ------ 92 

for Primary Vaccination, ----- 128 

for Re Vaccination, ------ L29 

American Public Health Association, 81 

218 

Boyine 01 Humanized Vaccine Virus, which most protective, - 109 

Canned (Joods, ------- 14 

- .tion of Malaria, Theories of the, - 1^7 

ipool Ventilation, ------ 90 

Chronic Lead Poisoning, ----- 14 

Compulsory Vaccination, - 106 

ises Prevalent in the Year, ----- i; 

Domi ins, ._-.-- i:j 

Drainage of New Ifilford, ----- 70 

Duties of Citizens in Protection of Health, 84 

i.mvs of Successful Vaccination, - - - - 124 

General Report, ------- l 

Ground Air, ------- 54 

Health Boards, Local, ------ 

State, ------ 85 

tt " List of, - - - - 86 

Ural; Resorts, ------- 87 

lity, - - - - - - - -4,82 

Insanity, Prevention of, Folsom, - 

■ nit ary : 

Adulteration of Food, 

Adulteration of Liquor, ----- 079 

Adulteration of Sugar, etc., - - - 'J?o 

1 1 [nquestB, ------ gfl 

Laws, ------ 

870 
- 
ised Animals, ----- 

[nominating Oils, ------ 944 

Infectious Diseases, - - - - - -871 

•J 



X INDEX. 

Laws, Sanitary : 

Irregular Medical Practice, ----- 272 

Milk from Diseased Cows, - - - - - 269 

Nuisances, ------- 269 

Oleomargarine, - - - - - ' . - 269 

Pollution of Water Supplies, - - - • - 268 

Public Halls, Protection Against Fire, - - - 267 

Quarantine, - • - - - - - ♦ - 265 

Registration Laws, ------ 279 

Sale of Medicines and Poisons, - 272 

State Board, of Health, ----- 275 

Unsafe Buildings, ---.__ 267 

Laws Proposed : - - - - - - 288 

Abolition of Coroners, - - - - 296 

Adulteration of Food, ----- 293 

Town Boards of Health, ----- 288 

Contagious Diseases, - - - - . - 295 

Disinfectants in Jails, ----- 291 

Removal of Bodies of Persons Dying of Contagious Diseases, 295 

Slaughter Houses, ----- - 290 

Vaccination, ------- 291 

Lead Poisoning, ------- 14 

Library of the Board, - - - - - - 21 

Library, Additions to, - - - - - - 92 

Local Health Boards, ------ 22 

Malarial Diseases, Prevalence in 1881, - - - - 9 

Malaria, --------67 

Malaria in New England, ----- 33 

Malaria in Connecticut, - - - - - - 133 

Theories of Causation, ----- 137 

Historical Sketch, ------ 142 

Table showing Date of Appearance, - 146 

Outline of Topography, ----- 148 

New Haven Region, - - - - - 150 

Towns in New Haven Region, - - 153 

New Haven and Westville, . - - - 154 

Orange, ------- 155 

Hamden, - - - * - - 155 

North Haven, ------ 156 

East Haven, ------ 157 

Branford, - - 157 

North Branford, - - - - - 158 

Wood bridge, - - - - - - 158 

Valley of the Quinnipiac, - - - - - 158 

Wallingford, - - - - 159 



RRPORT OF TFIR ST ATI-: BOARD OF HEALTH. \i 

Malaria in Oonnecticul Valley of the Quinnipi 

Salearille, - - - 160 

Meriden, ...... 160 

Cheshire, - - - - - -161 

Sonthington, ------ 162 

Lower Valley of the Naugatuck, - - - 169 

Waterbory, ... - 168 

Oxford, Seymour, Southbory, - - - 164 

Derby, - - - - - - -166 

\;ui'_r;ituck. ..---- 105 

Southwestern Watershed, ----- 166 

Milford, - - - - - -167 

ford, 167 

Bridgeport, - - - - - -167 

Fairfield, 

Weetport, - - - - - -168 

Norwalk, - - - - - 166 

Darien, ------- 109 

imford, - - - - - 1 70 

Greenwich, - - - - - - 171 

New Canaan, - - - - - - 172 

Wilton, - - - - - - - ^ 171 

on,- ------ 172 

Trumbull, 173 

Stepney,- - - - - - - 17:] 

Easton, - - - - - - - 1 7:J 

Ridgefield, - - - - - 17:5 

Redding, ------ 174 

Valley of the Housatonic, - - - - - 174 

Huntington, - - • - - - 171 

Monroe, - - - - - - - 17o 

Newtown, - - - - - 1 75 

Danbnry, - - - - - 17U 

Bethel, - - - - - - 170 

New Fairfield, - - - - - 177 

Brookft - - - - - - 177 

Bridgewater, - - - - - 177 

. Miltunl, --.--. 

Roxbnry, - - - - - - 178 

Woodbury, ------ 

Litchfield! - - - - - -178 

thfleld, ------ 179 

War- - - - - - - 1 7!) 

Kent, ------- 130 

1 ton, ... . 



Xll 



INDEX. 



Malaria in Connecticut — Valley of the Housatonic 

Cornwall, - 

Sharon, ----- 

Thomaston, - 

Salisbury, 

Canaan, ----- 

North Canaan, - - - - 

Goshen, ----- 

Norfolk, ----- 
Upper and Middle Valley of the Naugatuck, 

Winchester, - 

Thomaston, - 

Plymouth, - 

Watertown, - 
Valley of the Connecticut, - 

Enfield, ----- 
Thompsonville, - 

"Warehouse Point, - 

* Broad Brook, - 

South Windsor, - - - - 

East Hartford, - 

Ellington, - - - 

Somers, ----- 

Suffield, ----- 

Windsor Locks,- - 

East Granby, - 

Bloomfield, - 

Hartford, - 

West Hartford, - - - - 

South Manchester, - 

North " - 

Hebron, - 

Glastonbury, - 

" South, - - - - 

Wethersfield, - 

Newington, - ... 

New Britain, - 

Rocky Hill, - 

Berlin, - 

Cromwell, - 

Portland, - 

Chatham, - 

East Hampton, - 

Colchester, ■* 

Middletown, - 



181 
181 
181 
182 
182 
183 
183 
183 
184 
184 
184 
185 
185 
185 
185 
186 
186 
187 
187 
187 
188 
188 
189 
189 
190 
190 
190 
191 
192 
192 
193 
194 
194 
194 
195 
195 
196 
197 
198 
198 
199 
190 
200 
201 



REPORT OP THE 3TAT1 BOARD OF SKALTH. \m 

Malaria in Connecticut Valley of the Connecticnt : 

Durham, ------- 

Kiddleneld, - - - - 

Haddam, - 

Haddam, ...-.- 
Chester, ------- 204 

204 
Lyme, ------- 

brook, - - - - - -204 

Old Lyme, ------ 

Westbrook, ------ 205 

Clinton, ------- 205 

Madison, ------- 205 

Guilford, 206 

Valley of the Farmington, - 206 

Windsor, - - - - - - 20G 

Poquonoc, ------ 20G 

Granby, ------- 207 

Simsbury, ------- 207 

Tariflville, 207 

Avon, - - - - -.- - 208 

Farmington, ------ 208 

Unionville, - - - - - - 208 

Bristol, ------- 208 

Burlington, - - - - - 209 

New Hartford, .--..- 210 
Canton, ------- 210 

Plainville, ------- 210 

Ilartland, ------- 211 

Barkhamsted, - - - - - -J 11 

Valley of Thames, - - - - - 2 11 

Lebanon, - - - - - - — ^211 

Bozrah, - - - - - - -212 

Norwich, - - - - - - - 212 

Montville, - - - - - - -212 

East Lyme, - - - - - -218 

Eastern Boundary Line, ----- 218 

Stafford Springs, - - - - - -218 

Tolland, - - - - - - -918 

Coventry, - - - - - - 2 11 

Mansfield, - - -• - - - -214 

Willingtan, - 

Columbia, ------- 

igoe, -.----. 

Windham, - ... . . -215 



XIV 



INDEX. 



Malaria in Connecticut — Eastern Boundary Line 
New London, - 
Waterford, - 

Thompson, - 

Resume, - 
Bacillus Malar iae, - 
Influence on other diseases, 
Conclusion, ----- 
Malaria in Western Connecticut, by Gen. Viele, 
Evidences of Malarial Influences, 
Stamford, - 
Norwalk, - 

Newtown and Sandy Hook, 
Active causes, . - 

New Milford, Drainage of, 
Pest Houses, - 

Pneumonia in 1881, - 

Pollution of streams, - 

Progress of State Hygiene, 
Pyogenic Pneumonia, 
Publications of the Board, 
Removal permit in contagious diseases, 
Results of Sanitary Science, 

" " Vaccination, 
Rivers for water-supply, - 
Rules of Groton Board of Health, 
Sanitary Drainage of New Milford, 

" Condition of health resorts, 

" Improvements, - 
Scarlet Fever at Poquonoc Bridge, 
School Hygiene, -•-'-- 
Secretary's Report, - 

Sewers, large or small, 

" large, objections to, 
Sewerage of Stamford, - 

Report of Committee, 

Col. Waring's Report, 

Sub-soil Drainage, - 
Smalr-pox, prevalence in 1881, 

prevention in Conn., - 
Slaughter-houses, - - # - 

Special Investigations, - 
Spongilla Fluviatilis, - 



216 
216 

216 

217 

219 

222 

224 

227 

227 

229 

233 

235 

238 

70 

63 

12 

' 28 

3 

89 

21, 61 

63 

91 

104 

17 

85 

70 

25-87 

91 

75 

19 

60 

26, 53 

25 

39 

40 

46 

48 

6 

62 

91 

92 

17 



RE LTI BOARD OF BBALTH. xv 

Stamford, I ...... 

report on. - - - M 

------ 

l'uni: ....... 

of payment, ------ 

- 
Sunstroke Mortality in Cincinnati, - - 

Transportation of persons with'Contagioos Diseai - - 19 

proposed law, 2 
i Report, ------- 

Trichina-. -------- :o 

Trichuriasis, by Dr. Noah Cressy, Hartford, 
Natural History and Pathol - 

ry of, ------- 

Subsequent I - 

Natural 1 1 :' the Pari- - 

In Animals, - - - - - - -261 

History of tfa ;n man, .... 358 

- of Prevention, ------ 256 

iption of plate, ------ 

tion, ------ 256 

.litics in U. s.. Table of, - 
Bibliography, - ----- 2G0 

[nation, by Prof. C. A. Lindsley, Medical Dept Yale College, 103 
What it has done, -.._-. 104 

Compulsory, - - - - - - -10G 

Quality of Vaccine Virus, -* 107 

"Which virus most proteetiv .... 109 

pelas produced by, - 11G 

Microscopical illustration, ... 

< nt solid lymph co: - 119 

I low often should it be repeated, ... - 125 

for re-vacci nation, - - - 127 

primary, ------ 

d should be in health, - 

l»ns, ------- 

Vol >ciations, ----- 1 

tfl and odor of, - - - - -16 

William.-. isofPomfi .of, 



GENERAL REPORT. 



A general review of the progress of State medicine and public 
hygiene during the past year shows very encouraging results, and 
presents a very satisfactory outlook for the future. The claims of 
public hygiene have been more generally recognized by both State 
and national governments, and more systematic efforts have been 
made to prevent the introduction and spread of preventable 

by measures like the general quarantine act. which 
includes a well-digested plan for internal quarantine where 
needed. The voluntary sanitary associations that have sprung 
up all over the land, as the outcome of public necessity in 
9, in others from a recognition of the great benefits 
to be derived from such concerted action, are an exceedingly 
inter eature in -the development of sanitary science. The 

work that they have accomplished in many instances furnishes 

demonstrations of the power of sanitary measures in 

preventing epidemic diseases, were such needed. The sanitary 

council of the Mississippi valley ami the auxiliary sanitary associa- 

1 Orleans are examples of the first order. Not less 

valuable, in their respective fields, are the voluntary a88 
of those that realize th< y and importance of sanitary v. 

and are interested in the rapid develo t its scientific 

pects. The sanitary associations of Lynn and Newport are exam- 
ples of this order. An illustration of the important workaccom- 

ich BOCiet •' recent examination 

of ti. of the different wells in Newport, showing con- 

that almost invariably it was unfit for drinking pur- 
:iu r loaded with organic matter, that is, with the pro; 
o'f decay of animal an- i bill-health 

of many of the inhal - thus accom ' h 

idoin com Well drains | 

b Of the 

depending up - >il and al formation. 

1 



Z REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Few wells reach in reality what is called a spring, that is, water 
collected from a higher level, which thus finds an outlet, but most 
wells are mere shallow pits, depending entirely upon surface drain- 
age. In a new. sparsely settled country, where the ground 
receives but little contamination, the water is good enough, unless 
the well is placed, as is very often the case, too near a privy vault 
or cesspool. But as the population increases, as a matter of course 
the amount of filth increases, the soil becomes more or less sat- 
urated, and the water of the wells polluted. The time will indeed 
come when, as in many places in the old world, the garbage and 
filth of towns and villages will be at least once a day removed, 
instead of being stored up to pollute earth, air, and water. There 
is no greater nuisance than this storage of the accumulated filth 
of years, until the ground is honey-combed with covered pits of 
corruption. It has been conclusively shown that the germs of 
disease thus buried retain their vitality for years, and if brought 
to the surface, or carried into drinking water, are capable of 
again reproducing the original disease. This is especially true of 
typhoid fever, as it is now generally conceded that the germs of 
this disease are actively produced in the body during the continu- 
ance of the fever, and are thrown oft' by the excretions. The for- 
mation of these voluntary sanitary associations in cities and towns 
cannot be too strongly urged. The rural improvement societies 
might add this department to their work without another separate 
organization. Although the desirability of shade trees in proper 
places is cheerfully admitted, the free use of the axe would in 
very many cases be the first recommendation of the sanitarian. 
"Where trees shut out the sunlight from the house, and are so near 
it as to induce decay of the outer wood-work from the dampness 
they cause, they are unmitigated nuisances; and when the shade 
is so dense as to exclude the sunlight from the ground, they are 
so no less. The rays of the sun bring light, heat, and chemical or 
actinic power, and so are great purifiers. 

The past year has also witnessed a great activity in the organ- 
ization of local boards of health in the country generally, as well 
as in our own State. The State Board of Health has had more 
applications for counsel and advice during the past year than 
previously since its organization. One cause, it is true, has been 
the appearance of small-pox in many places, but apart from this 
the interest, zeal, and activity of local Boards has been very 
marked, contrasted with their former apathy and indifference. 



BEPOBT OF nil' BTAT1 BOARD <>f HEALTH. .5 

pointed health officers, usually selecting some pt 
eian interested in work, and others have delegated their 

powers to i more compact committee, of three usually, who re. 
porl tlly to the full Board. The progress in this direction 

has been very encouraging and commendable, and the outlook for 
the future is promising of better resull by one towns try 

the effect of extensive drainage. A fuller account of the acl 

v Milfonl in this direction is given elsewhere, of course 
it is too soon to expect results as yet. but nevertheless there has 
- lady decline in the frequency <>f malarial diss 
The progress State medicine in other States has been <•• 
ingly gratifying, tin 1 increased powers given to several St 
Boards of Health, and the active work of several of the new 
boards, as that of New Fork State for instance, i- another illustra- 
tion of i '1'he action, of several State medical societies 
entirely unsought on the part of the respective State Boards of 
Health is an indication of 'now State medicine is regarded by the 
medical profession generally, as in West Virginia, where the 
medical society voluntarily contributed a large sum, to incr 

appropriation by the State which they regarded as too small; 

similar a >rted from one or two other States at the 

moil of the American Public Health Association. The 

slature of Minnesota has followed the lead of Michigan and 

voluntarily increased the salary of the secretary of the State Hoard 

of Health, bo that he can devote his chief energies to the work. 

*>rdial endorsement by cur own State medical societies of 
: of the State Board of Health was exceedingly gratifying. 
Similar action was taken in all States having State Boards of 
Health, and the desirability of BUcb an organisation was as em- 
phatically asserted in others w datures have not 
inch boards. Indeed, the universal and 
hatic official action of every State medical society in this 
favor of em- 
- true that from various motives here and ti 
individui virulently attacked such organ- 
and have not .n worthy motive-, and 
• and belittle their work. Hut the outspoken verdict 
rally through try is in favor of 
such boards and their malignerB. It is not e that 
no 1: -.ill be made, nor is just c inwelcom 
is a large one, the problems presented would tax the brain of the 



i 



4 REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

wisest philosopher that ever lived, and an honest, earnest endeavor 
after the right clue in a most entangling labyrinth is too often the 
only course open. Sanitary science as a science, is new and gen- 
erally but little understood. Considering the time, of its develop- 
ment, the achievements have been most rapid and wonderful. 

It is also gratifying to announce that several States have created 
State Boards of Health since our last report was issued. West 
Virginia, Indiana, Arkansas, and New Hampshire have wheeled 
into line. There are now twenty-seven State Boards of Health, 
seven of which have been created within the last two years; and 
in other States the movement for the establishment of such 
board, is well under way. At the present rate, in a few years 
every State will have its Board of Health; the progress in this 
direction in the last few years has indeed been exceedingly rapid. 
There is, too, a singular misconception or misstatement of the 
claims of sanitary science. Its principles are clear and involve no 
other than rational processes. It is a fact too plain to require 
demonstration, that a large percentage of sickness and death is 
preventable, — not all, as some of its enemies imply, but a large 
portion,-— it is against this that the warfare is waged, and to dimin- 
ish this percentage is the work of the sanitarian. 

There are two elements in the problem: heredity and environ- 
ment. The personal element is included in the first. Oftentimes 
a lovely character is developed from two vile parents, so perfect 
health is sometimes found among the most squalid filth — but in 
neither case is this the rule. In the fight against preventable 
sickness and death, when the medium by which disease is con- 
veyed is known, as in the case of typhoid fever, the problem is 
very much simplified, as our efforts can be directed against the 
cause. In contagious diseases the problem is again complicated, 
as we have to contend against those causes that produce the dis- 
ease de novo, and its introduction and spread by contagion. This 
is often overlooked in explaining the phenomena of disease. 
Again, the virus of the disease may be exhaled into the air, or if 
the case be very malignant, the virus or germs may acquire an 
intenser activity and exert their influence through unusual dis- 
tances; all these elements complicate the problem. Still the degree 
of success obtained in the face of all discouragements is so great 
that our efforts are more than repaid. 

In other instances the endeavor is to remove causes that are 
somewhat general or universal, and agencies that are obscure, 



■ 



REPORT Of tin: STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 5 

■ r Lees the where the effects produced 

the only criteria of action; thai is, by the removal of certain 
materials the general health and Longevity is increased, and by 
their continuance the c iffect is produced, as in the coi 

against tilth. It is right here that tin* most common misconcep- 
tions arise. Because of our earnest crusade against filth it is 
often asserted and oftener implied that to the Banitariau the only 
requisite for the production of disease is filth. This is an error. 
The fight against tilth — using the term in its sanitary sense — is so 
bitter because experience has shown that it furnishes an essential 
element for the origin and development of the germs of dia 
and the best medium for their dissemination. As these germs of 
disease have by some been considered as the very quintessen< 
filth, the confusion may have thus arisen. It is true there are 
those that hold that germs of disease are produced directly from 
filth either developed els such at first, or that the organisms insep- 
erably connected with the processes of decay, and developed 
thereby may be still farther changed into poisonous germs. 
Others claim that the comparatively inert germs excite a simple 
inflammation, and in the processes of this inflammation virulent 
germs are developed. 

There is, however, a pretty universal agreement that filth alone 

does not produce disease except through the intervention of a 

germ or virus. Here two classes branch; the one holding that 

the genu of disease must be introduced from without somewhere. 

ne knows whence these wandering germs come, or by what 

agency they are brought in at the proper moment. The other, as 

before stated, believing that under proper circumstances the germs 

of disease are directly, or indirectly, produced from filth. There 

are, of course, those that deny an;. ve relation of tilth to 

In whichever way the virus or germs of diat oate, 

lathematically demonstrated that filth is a link in the 

0, and an essential one: removing that, we have then the 

tent of contagion to combat. This, of coins.', relates to those 

comprehensively called filth diseases, that is, bo fi 

causation is concerned; but an additional incenti I removal 

of filth is the depi nd unfavorable influence exerted upon 

all r. ud upon heall illy. In fine, thei 

• against filth, What its 

speciGc i do doubt is, an ingly mt« 



6 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

ing question for study. It is enough, however, for us that it is 
inimical to health and life, and of this it does not seem that there 
can be a question. 

Diseases Prevalent during the Year. 

The sanitary history of the year has, on the whole, been more 
favorable than that of the preceding year. There have been 
fewer local epidemics, and no disease has prevailed as extensively 
as the general epidemic of measles last year. Typhoid fever is the 
disease that has shown the most marked increase. This reached 
its lowest point in 1879, when there were only 159 deaths reported 
from that cause, while the average for the ten years ending with 
1879 was 370. The increase commenced in 1880 and has con- 
tinued steadily ever since. Massachusetts reports the same rela- 
tive facts. The increase of malarial fevers was supposed to have 
caused the decrease in the prevalence of typhoid. This year 
typhoid is reported in many towns where there had not been a 
pure case since the advent of malaria, — ranging from 1861 to 1874 
in different towns. In others both typhoid and typho-malarial fevers 
were reported as existing side by side. In the eastern part of the 
State, where there has been no malaria as yet, the same increase 
in the frequency of typhoid was noted; in fact, in some places, 
it was so frequent as to almost merit the name of an epidemic. 
The cities and larger towns also report more cases than for a long 
time. 

Diarrheal Diseases. 

These, as well as typhoid fever, appeared unusually early, and 
were productive of more than the usual percentage of mortality. 
This was especially true of cholera infantum, which was very per- 
sistent and malignant. The mortality in several of the cities was 
considerably increased from this cause. Owing to the long con- 
tinued hot, dry weather, the disease kept up its high rate for a 
much longer period than usual, extending even into October. 
Dysentery and bilious diarrhea among adults were quite prevalent, 
more especially the latter. In many instances the bilious diarrhea 
preceded typhoid fever, and as well as the latter showed a ten- 
dency towards hemorrhage, especially in malarious districts. 

Small Pox. 

This loathsome scourge has appeared in many of our cities and 
towns, and has been for the most part carefully managed. In one 



ESP0B1 01 nil BOABD OP HEALTH. < 

town if small-pox was discovered, and irrangen* 

made for it - >Uy took the train for 

another place, Fortunately apon arrival the disease wa 
• 1 and the quarantine prompt. The fad that the 

reading the d ccurs during convalescence of 

tin- patient, when shedding the Bcabe and 6ner scales from the 
skin. - well known as it should be The disease is i 

readily conveyed by the emanations from the skin than in say 
other way. This explains why tin- disease is not oftener spread 
by patients during the fire! from being about and coming 

into contact with many other persons, none of whom Buffer.* The 

advice of the State Hoard was repeatedly BOUght, and the pam- 
phlet of instructions on the prevention of small-pox widely called 
for. Besides those sent out. directly a case was Learned to exist 
in any town, over live hundred sve been directly called for. 

This publication b red the warmest endorsement of leading 

sanitary authorities at home and abroad. Upon the recommenda- 
tion of the British Medical Join ral English health officers in 

• pies, and from many cities in oth< 
similar requests have bet D made. So our work lias not been 
ly in vain. In but few of the towns was there any spread of 
the disease. In one instance a case was buried without a permit, 
and the sexton prosecuted ami lined according to law. The dlS- 
y ed headway in one plac by the carelessness of two men 
hired to bury a person that had died of small pox. Returning in 
an intoxicated condition they threw their clothing upon the beds 
Of their children, and thus communicated the disease in one in- 
stance at Ll :l;e families of both men were attacked. 

ination had been neglected the disease spread to a consider- 
able extent. In two of the manufacturing cities, where vaccina- 
. been i. . there was almost an epidemic. The 

experience of Hartford affords a Btrong argument in favor of Tac- 
tion. Although cases of Bmall-pox are introduced every 
from withoir been no Bpread oJ 

disease since the city has adopted the | -ina- 

r he publ: or three years. 

cases b mainly SI 

In one town the clothes of a BmaJ lent that had been 

id worn, and lease thus cause I. [i 

another tl chil- 

• It in not meant that • tat that It U 



8 REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

dren that played upon it were attacked. Another illustration of 
the less degree of danger of communicating the disease early was 
afforded by a German barber, who persisted in his trade after his 
child was broken out with small-pox. Whether prompt vaccina- 
tion was the means of preventing the small-pox is an open ques- 
tion. At any rate it was promptly performed. The barber's 
child died, and an old man who was exposed; no other cases. In 
one or two instances cases resulted from concealment of the dis- 
ease. The extreme penalty of the law should be inflicted in such 
cases. Taking into consideration its re-appearance in several 
cities after a considerable interval of time, small-pox has appeared 
over thirty times in the State this year. The few instances where 
a second case has resulted, and the fewer still where anything like 
an epidemic has taken place, speaks well for the sanitary knowl- 
edge and observance of vaccination within this State. Early in 
the year a general circular was issued, advising general vaccina- 
tion very strongly, and considerable attention was paid to it. 
Whenever a case of small-pox has appeared all the people in the 
vicinity have flocked to be vaccinated, and in thus doing have 
acted wisely. Attention has again been called to the subject, lest 
any may have been negligent. The subject of vaccination is fully 
discussed in Dr. Lindsley's paper, which is a very timely produc- 
tion. At the present time small-pox is known to exist in three 
towns, and probably there are other cases. The following history 
of the way the disease was managed in New Canaan is typical of 
the experience of other towns, except that perhaps unusual 
promptness in securing a proper pest-house was shown. The plan 
advised by the Board has been adopted in some instances. Ad- 
joining towns might readily build one jointly in some place easy 
of access to both. The condition of the pest-houses in some cities 
is disgraceful. In few, if any, are there any provisions made for 
convalescents or suspected cases, except the room where known 
cases are taken, and the heating and ventilation are on a par with 
the cooking arrangements. I do not know of any that have 
arrangements proper for disinfecting clothing and the like, as 
advised in our plan. 

" The first patient was a domestic who contracted the disease in 
New York. Just as soon as Dr. Brownson discovered the nature 
of her disease, he notified the selectmen, who immediately looked 
about for a proper place to remove her so that the disease might 
not be spread. Several places were examined, and at last an old and 
unoccupied house was selected. It stands isolated from any other 



B1P0BT OP TBI stati: BOARD OF HEALTH. V 

dwelling, the nearest house being nearly a quarter of ;i mile t 
and is the only house upon the Btreet Travel was Bhul off, which 
did not inoonvenienoe the public greatly, owing to the location of 
other roads in the vicinity. We admire the judgment of the 
•men in their choice ot ;i hospital, and they Bhould receive 
the approval of every good citizen. This first patient's disease 

.■■.I to be the continent small-pox. one of the worst form 
this foul plague. The next patient was a young student of Dr. 

who volunteered to treat the unfortunate woman. 

He was attacked with a Light form of varioloid. He immediately 
took up his residence at the pest-house, and continued there until 
all danger was passed. The third and fourth cases were a lady 

and her child, who exposed themselves while at " \Y hist leville," 
in Xorwalk. These two latter only had a light form of varioloid. 

N resident ^>( this town has "caught " the disease from the four 
»ns above mentioned, and this fact alone ought to be a suffi- 
cient guarantee that all the care ry has been taken by 
the physician and authorities. The selectmen have used all the 

• my consistent with safety and comfort, and it is our honest 
opinion that it would have been hard work indeed to have found 
a set of men who could or would have handled this affair as well 
as those now in authority. Give honor where honor is due. At 
the present writing there is no known case of small-pox or vario- 
loid in town."' 

It is earnestly advised that a law be passed requiring all chil- 
dren to present a certificate from some reputable physician that 
they tected from small-pox by satisfactory vaccination. 

The disease has so often been introduced of late by emigrants that 
it would almost seem advisable to have an inland quarantine for 
such on entering the State, requiring vaccination before the. 
allowed to scatter over the State. Some States have done this 
ntly. The action of the government requiring vaccination 
before they are permitted to land from emigrant ships may prove 
sufficient. One or two instances where paper stock was the 
medium of conveying the contagion Bhould have been mentioned. 



If ▲LABIAL !' 

have certainly held their own this year: indeed the mortalM 

:. a- when they : ear there are but 

fatal cases. The results of such ini made 

are l- will be snppL by studies of the 1< 

•Miieetion with the National I 

Health, it | that the bacilli; will be 

lome other experimental tests made as to the 



10 REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

origin of the disease. The report of General Viele and the map 
by Gen. Ellis will afford better opportunities for future study. 
The Connecticut River is shown in accordance with the surveys 
made by Gen. Ellis for the United States government, and the 
map is one of exceeding value. There have been no marked 
extensions of the disease. Singularly enough the same limit 
marks its easterly extent as in colonial days, and to a great extent 
it revisits its old haunts. For several years it has halted on the 
west bank of the Thames and its tributaries. The disinclination 
to pass rivers, if I may so express it, is a very marked feature. 
There have been several local epidemics, the most marked at 
Thompsonville, where a hundred cases nearly, with some typho- 
malarial, occurred about the same time. This is of too recent 
occurrence to be fully discussed at present. In the New Haven 
region generally there has been a less number of cases as a rule, 
but with some exceptions the same remarks would apply to the 
malarial territory generally. The extension northerly and easterly 
has been by leaps from Ashley Falls to Sheffield, from Sheffield to 
Lenox. The history is nearly the same in the valley of the 
Connecticut. Suddenly several hundred cases appeared in Spring- 
field, leaping from Enfield; then the next jump was to Holyoke.* 
From Lyme on the Sound, or from some other place, it made the 
greatest vault to Cranston and the adjacent parts of Providence, a 
hundred odd cases at about the same time. 

"While not disposed to depreciate at all the effect of local causes, 
a careful study of the manifestations of the disease recently in 
New England leads me to believe that there is some other cause or 
causes at work that exert a more widespread influence. The study 
of epidemiology is as yet only a study, but careful research into 
this epidemic may contribute some much-needed facts. The three 
State Boards and the National Board of Health ought by and by 
to arrive at some conclusions even upon so intricate a subject as 
this. If New Jersey would join New York, Massachusetts, and 
Connecticut, the results would be still more complete. There have 
been no new varieties of malarial diseases; neuralgias and particu- 
larly hemi-crania have been more frequent perhaps, and supra- 
orbital neuralgia. The mongrel malarial fever and typho-malarial 
fevers are discussed later. The peculiar sudaminous rash of the 
latter is worthy of especial note, as it has been very marked in 
many cases. 

*This relates to its epidemic appearance more particularly, not the first cases. 



REPORT OF Tin: BTATI BOARD Of HK\LTH. 11 

DlFHTHEBlA. 

not been as extensively prevalent in any one 
town as it was in New London last year, but there have been 
man] type in Hartford, Waterbury, Niantic, and 

gatock, and it lias been reported as unusually prevalent in 
many other places. It has shown a marked tendency to extend 
through all the children in a family, and several instances are 
given when" from three to five children have died in one family. 
The isolated Bporadic cases, as well as those of scarlet fever, are as 
puzzling as ever, and favor strongly the theory of local tilth 
cal of the special cases are described later. Many 
booses and surroundings have been examined, and the usual care- 
arrangements found. 
In one cast' the trap of a water-closet much used was ventil 
into the pantry among other evils. There should be an inspection 
.red by law of all tenement houses, and certain things insisted 
For instance, a bath-room or water-closet should never be 
that it cannot be freely ventilated directly into the open 
air. Inside water-closets are an abomination, and are almost 
always a source of ill health, and the same remark applies some- 
what less forcibly to bath-rooms; but usually the two are combined, 
sometimes tacked away under a stairway, oftener, in double 
. the middle, for cheapness in construction. 

SCAHLKT FXVSB 

':>een more prevalent than for many years previous. An ac- 
count is Lriven of the epidemic at Poquonnac Bridge later. Hart- 
ford, New Haven, Derby, Salisbury, and other towns reported 
mor- lan usual, and of ;i type, I »f late this disease 

has not figured largely in the mortalit] Measles were very 

prevalent in a few places that escaped the epidemic of last year 
which, considering the children alone, could almost have 
called pandemic. R6theln or German measles, Roseola, and a 
hybr -n measles and scarlet fever and chick- often 

made the diagnosis difficult between these and small-pox for a day 
or so, until one or the other was fully developed. It is no job 
send to the pest-house, as now into an room, al- 

mos- vesto be roseola or German 

•-houses were built upon our plan ould 

pected cases, that could readily be 



12 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

disinfected should a case of small-pox develop in it. Whooping- 
cough has continued to invade new territory. It seems to have 
something of a cyclical tendency, returning once in about so often, 
although the uniformity is not marked in this respect. 

Cerebro spinal meningitis appears to have become endemic in 
nearly the same territory that is occupied by malarial diseases, but 
is not confined there exclusively. It has been unusually prevalent 
this last year, and of quite a severe type, the mortality larger than 
the average. Formerly it appeared but rarely, and usually in 
epidemic form. Erysipelas also has been more than usually fre- 
quent. In fine, all diseases that are favored by an unusually dry 
and protracted hot season have shown a marked increase, taking 
the whole list into consideration. 

Pneumonia 
And acute lung diseases were very frequently seen last winter and 
spring, extending even into the summer months. Some cases of 
what was apparently pyogenic pneumonia were reported. That is 
caused by the absorption of filth, and consequent poisoning of the 
blood. Still oftener are acute lung affections caused by breathing 
polluted air or overheated air, diminishing the powers of resist- 
ance of the lungs and rendering them particularly sensitive to 
atmospheric changes, and especially to the depressing influence of 
cold ; so that instead of quickening the flow of blood through the 
lungs, and in turn sending it tingling through the veins, the 
lungs were chilled, the blood stagnated, disease and death induced. 
Catarrhal, laryngeal, and bronchial troubles, although not fatal, 
have been very prevalent. 

Upon the whole, the health of the State, while from obvious 
reasons not as good as the average, has been better than during 
the preceding year. That, indeed, was a very unusually unhealthy 
year everywhere, and the past one has been so to a less degree. 
We can congratulate ourselves most heartily, and have a right to, 
upon our sanitary skill when we remember how often small-pox 
has shown itself, under what varied circumstances and diverse sur- 
roundings, yet never has anything like a general epidemic been 
developed ; and, as a rule, although its would-be malignancy was 
fully shown in the confluent type and its fatality among the pri- # 
mary victims, yet but few cases spread from these. So far as 
small-pox is concerned, during the year this preventable disease, 






BEPORT OF Tin: BTATE BOABD 01 SBALTH. L8 

for the most part prevented. While onr neighbors were suffer- 
ing from virulent epidemics they came among us and we wen\ among 
them, but thanks to the protective power of vaccination, encount- 
ered no evil. As many towns in our State lit- upon tin- | 

thoroughfares of traffic, and in many of the cities sniall-pox has 

1. the immunity we have enjoyed shows pretty conclusively 
the protective power of vaccination. The increased attention to 
the subject of vaccination caused by these outbreaks or rather 
importations of small-pox (for oftentimes the disease was brought 
by a servant) promises still greater immunity for the future. It 

is also to the credit of the State that a few decent pest-houses are 
to he erected, where persons can he carefully treated without 
Undue exposure, and all the accessories for disinfection and con- 
valescence at hand. Thus while the year has not been as health- 
ful as the average, we can congratulate ourselves on the threatened 
dan- :>ed, and plan for the future with increased confi- 

dence. 

Domestic Poisons. 

This topic promises to be a perpetual one as each year brings up 
work in this field, new or old. The deleterious effects of tinned 
copper, so called, articles for domestic use of which were made in 
this State, was the first example that was brought to our notice. 
A more dangerous fabric could hardly be devised, and analysis 
verified the suspicion that deleterious compounds resulted from its 
use. It should be absolutely rejected as unsafe and undesirable to 
use. Two cases of poisoning from aniline dyes were brought to 
our notice early in the year, and others later. The first was from 
blue woolen wristlets: the second from a yellow wool fabric used 
for lining mittens ; one from a blue veil, and several from dark- 
blue stockings. The eruptions were characteristic and severe, and 
in several of the case- long continued. There was considerable 
febrile disturbance and pain. Analysis showed arsenical com- 
pounds in three instances. The yellow lining of the mittens 
dyed with one of the derivatives from coal tar. said to he irritating 
to the skin, imt containing no arsenic. In most of the cases 
soluble in wat< 

A sari - of lead poisoning were rather curiously caused. 

farmers in a certain region boughl barrels that had conts 
boiled oil to put cider in for drinking and also to make into 



14 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

vinegar. There was a coating of litharge (oxide of lead) used in 
boiling the oil, upon the inside of the barrels. The acids in the 
cider readily dissolved this, and thus it became loaded with lead. 
The longer the cider was kept, of course, the more' acid it gener- 
ated the greater the quantity of lead dissolved. 

Cases of chronic lead poisoning from cosmetics and hair dyes, 
containing lead, have been noted, but these are not as often brought 
into publicity; and, indeed, many an obscure cause of disease 
might be traced to this source, especially apparently obscure cere- 
bral and spinal diseases. Ill-health thus caused comes on so 
insidiously that its cause is unsuspected, — a harsh, dry skin, fail- 
ing appetite, dyspepsia, chronic constipation, neuralgias, and later, 
colic and indisputable signs supervene. Quite as often, however, 
convulsive attacks or some form of mental aberration keep up the 
deception; indeed, rarely do unquestionable symptoms supervene 
unless the lead accumulates in the system. The depressing effects 
of long continued absorption of small quantities destroys health 
and life oftener without any characteristic warning. Paralysis of 
the extensors — partial, oftener, — is the more common indication, if 
any be given. Almost all the popular hair-dyes and cosmetics 
contain lead in large quantities; the test can be made at any drug- 
gists. Dissolve the suspected substance in nitric acid. If sus- 
pended in oil, the oil may be removed by adding alcohol or ether, 
shaking thoroughly and filtering; then dissolve the sediment in 
nitric acid, dilute with water, and add a little of a solution of 
bichromate of potash. Chrome yellow is produced. If in a 
watery solution the bichromate solution can be added directly, 
hydrochloric acid forms a white chloride of lead, which dissolves 
in boiling water and may be thus distinguished from silver, which 
is comparatively harmless. 

There has been a growing impression of late that canned meats 
are unwholesome. Where a soluble lead solder is used, there is 
no doubt that considerable lead is often dissolved, enough to do 
harm. But in addition to that, it is more than probable that some 
forms of canned goods, especially fat meats and acid fruits, dis- 
solve more or less tin in two forms — stannous hydrate and stannic 
hydrate, — the first containing more tin than the second, and there- 
fore more deleterious. Recent researches by a German chemist 
have shown this to be the case in certain instances, and his experi- 
ments have been confirmed by others. This does not always occur, 
and doubtless some means will be found, in the case of meats at 



UPOBT of THK STATE BOABD OF BBALTH. L6 

least, of obviating this danger. I? .done in the case 

of fruits, nor is the da .:ivat, the oomponndfl formed b 

deleterious. The canning of articles of food 

adustry thai ai rae this will boob be obviated. 

aed goods have made themselves such a necessity thai they 
canu spensed with. Fortunately these compounds are not 

invariably formed, and, the danger having been discovered, the 
remedy will soon follow. The nature of the compounds in i 
of meal is not as dear. 

A ease of arsenica] poisoning from a bright green flocculent wall- 

sting. The symptoms had long been obscure, 

when a physician saw the paper of the bed-chamber, and, at once 

■ Cting it, took a sample for analysis; also some dust from the 
top of a dressing-ease that stood in the room. The paper was found 
to contain a large percentage of arsenic, and the tests were unmis- 
takable for arsenic in the dust taken as described. Upon the 
removal of the paper and substitution of a harmless variety, the 
patient soon regained health. 

Special [nvustioations. * 

Tl. "Seen more numerous than ever during the past year. 

Full details of the more important may be found in the Secretary's 
report. In spite of the increased attention to sanitary matters 
paid of late, many glaring evils were found where one would least 
suspect them. One may perhaps as well be mentioned here, A 
gentleman, quite intelligent in sanitary matters, and very much 
more interested than the average, had remained quiet, although 
often detecting quite decidedly bad odors about his house. As 
.1. he. like all others, was the last to admit that anything could 
be wrong about his own premises. By strong urging he was at 
to make an investigation, when he found, mi: 

• for a long period, from a break in tic main 
drain, the filth had been fully a- much d his base- 

ment floor as carried into the ir or more Is 

loads were carted awaj clean earth was reached; th • cavity 

ith dean . by the \x 

-* should beany lurking evil. Tin- I 
one after another of his family, him 
fail* 

: 



i 



16 REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

epidemics have been studied, some of which will be found de- 
scribed as mentioned; in others the history is not yet complete, and 
they will therefore be deferred until the next report. 

Trtchiniasis. 

The detection of trichinae in ' a specimen of pork raised in this 
State led to the submission of a great number of specimens to be 
examined, and for a while work in that line was very lively. As 
all the members of one family, and some others that had eaten 
the pork, were affected, considerable interest was excited. For- 
tunately there were no fatal cases. In view of the general igno- 
rance of the subject then displayed, it was deemed advisable to 
prepare a paper giving definite knowledge upon the subject. This 
paper is in the hands of Dr. Cressy, who has himself made inves- 
tigations upon the subject, and, as shown by his paper in our last 
report, is abundantly able to discuss the contagious diseases com- 
municable to mankind from animals. While cases originating in 
this State are uncommon, and it is seldom found to a dangerous 
extent, yet it is wel^to popularize knowledge upon the subject, as 
all dangers from this source can be readily avoided. The paper is 
well worth perusal. 

Bad Taste and Odor in Potable Water. 

This subject has excited renewed interest in several places, 
especially in Hartford, during the present winter. The cause does 
not seem to be completely understood, as the taste and odor 
appear and disappear with great rapidity. In a night, as it were, 
water that was before clear, odorless, and tasteless will be found 
possessed of the vilest odors and most objectionable taste. One 
thing appears certain, the change oftenest takes place in the pipes; 
for, when the water at the ponds and reservoirs is sweet and taste- 
less, that drawn from the faucets will oftentimes be bad smelling 
and taste fully as bad as it smells. Various causes have been 
assigned and remedies suggested. Animal and vegetable decay, 
especially of the minuter forms of life, have been assigned ; vari- 
ous water plants that when bruised give similar odors have been 
charged with the causation ; but the problem is not wholly solved 
as yet. Flushing the pipes and filtering have been suggested and 
tried as remedies with no very satisfactory results, although it is 
always advisable to keep the pipes clean and free from sediment. 



RIPOBT Of THi BCATI BOJLBD 01 hkalth. 17 

The Last cause that lias been brought forward ia the water plant 

[rich clings to sticks and other 
when it «iu's or Lb destroyed in the pipes produces these unplea 

It is. do doubt, the cans,- sometimes, bul I do nol believe 
that any one cause will account for all the occasions when bad 
odors ami tastes appear. Ail cities have been thus afflicted at 

times, as far as 1 can learn, the (Jroton Water at New York from 

a running river, and water obtained from an upland water-shed <>f 

uncultivated land, one of the best imaginable supplies of pure 
water, and ponded in reservoirs. — in fact, all water exposed I 
and sunlight is charged more or less with the minuter forms of 
animal and vegetable life; and if these are oftentimes the agencies 
that produce the bad taste and odor, the recurrence is a matter of 
under the present system. I have not learned that the 
charge lias ever been made against water derived from under- 
ground filtration, that is, where the ground-water is received tx >m 
the base of a subterranean gallery and there stored, as in several 

e; but all other sources of supply are open to this objection, 
more or less, the ponded waters from surface drainage perhaps 
more than others. The use of rivers to obtain supplies for large 
towns ami cities has been suggested, as they are Less liable to this 
fault ami, as their enthusiastic advocates claim, entirely exempt. 
Supposing it free from these, the objection to the use of river- 
t is that almost all rivers are polluted with manufacturing 

te and sewage, and that these elements of pollution are w 
than the occasional bad odor and I in the first place the 

pollution is constant, while the odor and taste are exceptional and 
:nue but a little while. If the apongtUa be the cause, some 
means will soon be found to prevent its development and growth 
or to obviate its effects in some way. Then again, hov. 

unpleasant to the taste and smell the water may be at times, what- 
cause, whether A pongiUa t the water 

do deleterious effect upon the public health, of 
■ liable and offensive, and one's 
rises against it." but the m rvation and study 

failed to prove that any ill-health i- caused thereby. If 

band, ti.' 
does .. as has I 

that the . loaded with manufactur- 

.aste when it is drawn from r: l public supply, but this 



I 



18 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

waste adds its quota to the pollution and to the amount that has to 
be disposed of before the water again becomes pure. It may be 
stated as a general rule that water that has once been polluted by 
sewage is never again fit to be used as a supply for drinking and 
cooking. It is true that under the lead of Dr. Letheby a school 
was formed that taught that a stream purified itself in a few miles 
run. But their numbers, once increasing, are now diminishing 
rapidly, and the strongest advocates of this view are yielding, 
point by point, compelled by the stern force of fact, as the meth- 
ods of investigation become more delicate and we learn more of 
the changes that take place in polluted water. It is true that, in 
the first few miles run, almost all the crude sewage disappears; 
but no one has been able as yet to determine at what point the 
more intractable and less easily oxidized materials disappear. 
Moreover, the formed products of this oxidation of sewage, the 
albuminoid ammonia, the nitrites, chlorides, and the like, are not 
themselves entirely innocuous, and they persist for a long time, 
and their distance limit has not yet been fixed. Bat of still 
greater consequence is the fact that the germ of disease, or the 
particulate of the lowest animal or vegetable nature, or even in- 
organic if that be its nature, is not oxidized nor destroyed, 
nor is the limit of its disappearance known. This is the most 
important fact of all, for it is thus that disease is conveyed. 
Whether filth is capable of originating disease or no, it is certain 
that the germ or particulate of disease is capable of reproduc- 
ing the disease whenever it is received into any human system 
adapted to receive it. As the excreta of typhoid fever and the 
discharges from the upper air-passages in diphtheria are cast into 
the sewer oftentimes, and that, in fact, the sewer receives the virus 
germ or particulate of every form of communicable disease, the 
dangers from polluted w T ater are obvious. In fact, this is one 
great source of danger in all filth, that it is a carrier of the partic- 
ulate element of disease. In fine, it is no adequate reason for 
changing the source of supply because of temporary bad tastes 
and odors. These, whether caused by Algae animalculoe, the decay 
of substances in the pipes, or by the spongilla, do not impart 
qualities to the water harmful to health. On the contrary, rivers 
polluted by sewage or other water thus polluted becomes the car- 
rier of the germs or particulate of disease, and even, in some 
instances, are so loaded with sewage that enteric and other trou- 
bles are directly caused by its use. As the subject is one of con- 






REPORT Of Tin-: STATE BOARD OF BBALTH. 19 

nderable importanoe and inl ad the whole question oi 

■i and the Lower Forms oi life in potable water and their 

bscnre, we have •■"in: stematic 

studies upon the subject, and expect in our next report a paper on 

tli«> relation of aquatic plants to the odors and tastes in potable 

. from an expert in thi< connection. 

School I : 

A paper upon a practical phase in thi rive and important 

Bubje and promised until it was too late to supply 

the deficiency, as any contribution to this subject must be most 

folly and thoroughly studied. Had notice been received in 

time, a paper on the injury to the development of the human 

brain by too early forcing the reflecting faculties, and by training 

and methods in advance of development of function, would have 

been completed in place of the one withheld. In our second 

report the sui touched upon in discussing the age of seven 

•per one to be selected for the commencement of school 

atic training except upon the kindergarten plan. 

•hool life in this State begins at a much earlier age, the topic 

is certainly worthy of the most careful consideration. There are 

a multitude of topics that are open for investigation here. We 

are accumulating facts all the time which may be collated at a 

future occasion, when the topics to which they relate are formally 

discussed. 

Among other points we hope to complete some studies upon 
the air in school-rooms, and places of public assemblage, by a 
practical examination of a sufficient number of rooms, by means 
of recently -devised apparatus for that purpose, so that the re- 
will be general enough to base some deductions upon. 
There is also a somewhat strange dearth of facts upon the 
influence of school life upon health of the pupils, and in what 
manner, and just what are the guilty factors. [1 is hoped to 
r upon a systematic study of that topic next year, as it is 
'ful if it can be completed in one year. We have con- 
rable data on some points; for u the 

health of girls in the advanced claaf elled t<.rlimb 

man inducing pelvic derangements that compel 

a large percentage to leave school. The prima who 

would b« by the exercise than otherwise, occi 

imb to the third 
.ips higher. Unhygienic ; net unknown 



20 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

denial of recess and afterwards retention after school, resulting 
in hours of agony, days of illness under a physician's care, from 
the enforced neglect of nature's wants, have been brought to our 
notice. The denial of recess as a punishment has been wisely 
abolished in some towns, and should be in all. The foundations 
of life-long misery may be laid by careless treatment during the 
impressionable period of school life. The plan proposed in Mary- 
land will probably, with some modifications, be adopted. The aid 
of the physicians generally is to be invoked, as well as that of the 
various Boards of Education, and a systematic visitation and 
inquiry made by the family physician of each family as to the 
effects of school life in all its details upon their children from 
parents or guardians. This is in brief the plan. The educational 
authorities in this state, from the Superintendent of the Board of 
Education down, have shown the greatest interest in this depart- 
ment, and, under the intelligent supervision of Prof. Northrop, 
Connecticut is far in advance of many states in school hygiene. 
But the question of the best educational methods to make the 
most of the boy and girl that can be made out of the material is 
yet not wholly solved, and any contribution to the subject is as 
welcome to the practical educator as to the sanitarian. The edu- 
cational authorities have pretty thoroughly solved the problem as 
to the methods by which the greatest amount of instruction can be 
given in a stated time. But the sanitarian is not satisfied with 
this result. His problem is to develop to the highest attainable 
point the body, as well as the mind, so that whatever intellectual 
training one may have it may be used by its possessor in the life 
struggle, not a mass of material which he must be ceaselessly 
adjusting, and an illy-balanced organization, brain and mind devel- 
oped at the expense of muscle, physical force, and executive abil- 
ity. The temptation to enlarge when once this point is touched 
upon is very great. 

There are several practical suggestions as to legislative action 
that may as well be made here. One we repeat from last year: 
that is, that a law should be passed requiring a certificate of proper 
protection by vaccination from the family physician, health officer, 
or town physician, before a child can be admitted to any school in 
this state. Second, that school officers shall have power to exclude 
from school, children coming from a house where there is a malig- 
nant case of contagious disease until such attendance be pro- 
nounced safe by the health authorities. Third, that children that 



. 



REPORT Of TR1 BTATB BOARD Of HEALTH. 21 

have been rick with measles, scarlet fever, diphtheria, or small 
pox be required to present a certificate <>f health from their family 

physician or from the health authorities before they shall be 
allowed to return to school. 

tiik Library. 

Many valuable additions have been made during the past year 

to the library of the Hoard. Our exchanges are especially valua- 
ble. Special thanks are due the Hon. .1. I J. Hawley. M. ( '., for 
valuable gifts. The last volume issued of the Medical and Surgi- 
cal History of the War and the last Report on Food-Fishes 
■dally valuable, It was well remarked by the president of the 
erican Public Health Association, "That man is often the best 
employed and most overworked sanitarian who is doing nothing 
at the moment for the citizens under his care, but who is eagerly 
widening the too narrow limits of his knowledge." The field is a 
wide one and the advancements rapid. In no other department 
of BCJ re there so many new developments, and constant 

study is necessary in order to avail oneself of all the powers of 
sanitary science for the protection of the people. The library of 
the Hoard is one of its most important features, and year by year 
is constantly gaining in value. Our thanks are also due our Pres- 
ident. Dr. Butler, for valuable contributions, some of them not 
otherwise obtainable for love nor money. 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE BOARD. 

The monthly sanitary reports published by the Board have 
increased in value each year as they have become more and more 
comprehensive. Comparisons can also be made to a limited 
rue, but this is all the while enlarging. The follow- 
ing remarks from an article in the New York Journal of Cam- 
re so thoroughly explanatory of this system and so appre- 
• • that we reproduce them here. 
"The Board merely calls attention to th leaving local 

authorities to discover the immed -<■ and apply sanitary 

s, if any can be found. This is about all the State Board 
'ipowered to do, and it generally answers the purpose in Con- 
be people do not like to have their locality made noto- 
rious as unhealthy through the monthly bulletins of the Hoard. 
In those parts of the State which have Buffered most from malaria 

the effect of this mild official interference has been very g 1. 

i. has been done to improve drains and al in 

Most approved Banitary fashion with all 



22 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

disease. Therefore, while the area of malarial affections seems to 
be enlarging in Connecticut, their number and intensity are 
decreasing in the old favorite homes of those distempers, specially 
in the New Haven region. These changes are attributable to the 
judicious supervision of the Board of Health. The commissioners 
have not hesitated to publish bills of mortality of all the cities 
and towns of the State once a month, and to report, without fear 
or favor, the actual cause of death, accompanying these statistics 
with exposures of all sanitary deficiencies. Before any city which 
respects itself has been told twice of its culpable neglect and con- 
sequent sickly condition, the best remedies which science can sug- 
gest will be applied, and generally with happy results. 

" There is need in this State for similar action on the part of the 
New York Board of Health. A monthly statement of the mortal- 
ity of all the counties, with incisive comments on the preventable 
causes of death, could not fail to do some good here, as well as 
in Connecticut." 

The last annual report was received with great favor and is the 
first for which there has been any considerable foreign demand. 
It was impossible to half supply the demand. Hundreds of appli- 
cations from without the State were refused. We now have only 
enough to supply the rest of the states as they establish state 
boards. It received unqualified commendation from the highest 
sanitary and medical authorities in this country and abroad. The 
application for copies received from architects, civil engineers, and 
professional men, and the unsought praises that have been given 
to its practical character are very gratifying. These facts are not 
mentioned in self -laudation, but as showing the progress made and 
the increasing interest in sanitary literature. The appointment of 
several professors of public hygiene in institutions of learning is 
in the same line of progress as the higher place taken by sanitary 
literature. 

The sanitary tracts on small pox, typhoid fever, diphtheria, dis- 
infectants, rural hygiene, those explaining the nature and province 
of state medicine, of treatment of drowned, have all had a wide 
circulation and are constantly called for. Those for registrars 
and connected with the registration department are noticed else- 
where. The letters of inquiry received by the Board have also 
been much more numerous than ever and on a much wider range 
of subjects, generally practical questions involving sanitary princi- 
ples. 

LOCAL HEALTH BOARDS. 

There is growing up -a very pleasant relation between many of 
the local health boards and the State Board. Consultations are 



REPORT 01 Tin: BTATB BOARD Of SBALTB. 28 

much more frequent. The circular of instructions to Local health 

under the laws and what it shou] 
their duty to do, as well as what they should aim to accomplish, 
has been delayed until after the present legislature, when • codifi- 
cation of the laws relating to Banitary Bubjecta will be presented 
to the Legislature. There are uoi bo many changes and new pro. 

triangle the old and make plain just what 

Uie provisions of the law arc when there have been new enact- 
ments and amendments upon amendments. This is particularly 

true with regard to the registration laws. So many changes have 
been made, and in some c crligence in distinctly repealing 

lete provisions, that it is with difficulty that the law can be 

learned on some points, usually of minor importance, how. 
Still it would be better to have a plain understanding. The revi- 
sion of the registration laws is in the second part of this report, 
where it more properly belongs. Advice has been sought, not 
only in relation to small pox, but also upon nearly all the range of 
subjects likely to come before such organizations. As present 
constituted, unless by special provision some more definite organi- 
:i adopted, the selectmen and justices of the peace 
constitute the board of health. This is all very well, but I 
should be some easier way than at present for this somewhat 
unwieldy body to delegate their powers, or such as they may 
choose, to a smaller and more compact body, and to appoint a 
:\ if they see lit. The manner of calling them 

her as a board of health should also be made a little more 
plain. If all the boards in cities and boroughs were directed by 
law to make an annual report in full of all their transactions dur- 
ing tlie current year to the city council or wardens and burgee 

nnit a copy of the same to the State Board of Health, it 
would be a great improvement. At present. New Haven is the 
only city that sends a full report. There has been considerable 
grumbling and criticism concerning I Raven Board of 

:h, but the results they have accomplished show that I 

city could well have afforded to have paid them large salaries and 
D them a large appropriation in place of t he small sum 

ag a seaport town, wl are Liab 

I from all nations, including the plague-stricken E 

rts of their I 'king bos 

Long the 
to Dr. Lindsley and b well de- 



24 REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

served, for it is the resultant of intelligent work in the face of 
unbelief and reproach. As well said by Dr. White, at Savannah: 
" The sanitarian goes a warfare at his own charges. The sanitary 
work of the world has been done, and to-day is being done, for 
love of knowledge and love of man. I know of but one locality 
in the United States where those responsible for the public health 
are paid in such measure as railroad companies, banks, or great 
mercantile corporations recompense work of similar high value." 
How many lives saved and how much suffering and loss prevented 
is included in that achievement no one can justly estimate. The 
reduction of one per cent, in the death rate of a city like New 
Haven means life to hundreds that would otherwise have perished, 
and health to thousands that otherwise would have languished on 
beds of pain and sickness. Other boards are doing good work in 
their way. The Hartford board has been managed with exceed- 
ing intelligence and in accordance with sanitary laws, under its 
active and earnest head, Dr. Fuller. The New Haven board has 
the advantage of a compact, working organization, while the oth- 
ers, for the most part, have to work single-handed, unless given 
special powers for the occasion. Meriden has an excellent system 
for practical results, and a large amount of practical sanitary work 
has been accomplished there of late. It is very like New 
Haven in some respects, — that is, they have a vigilant, active, 
intelligent health officer to do the real work. The health board of 
New London have deserved great credit, working in face of con- 
siderable discouragement. They have no doubt greatly improved 
the sanitary condition of the city and worked to the full extent of 
their power. In fact, all the city health boards have been unu- 
sually energetic. The local boards of the towns must not be 
ignored. They also have done good work in many places, 
especially in contending against small pox. The appearance of 
this dread disease in so many places in our State, in the large 
majority of instances introduced by a foreigner, often an emigrant 
recently off ship-board, has not been an unmixed evil. In the 
first place, it has induced a large number of persons heretofore 
negligent to be vaccinated, and that thoroughly. Then it has 
stirred up the town boards of health to become organized more 
compactly, in some instances; and in all the effect has been more 
than transient. Other unsanitary conditions have engaged their 
attention. 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF SRALTH. 25 

OTTAB1 iMi'i:.«\ 

A full ace ''mi is given <»i' th< 3 mford, Conn., by 

I Ifii il. lie exp] 

how they intend f »r the work, which is a very important 

the business. This i< given with such detail that all the 
be well u ■ 1. as they an- all of impor- 

this was written. 1 have the report of the • 
of 1> same plan. The objection 

he flush-- y here, Burely, if any- 

where. The house connections were underway when he wrote, so 
it is too early e how their experience compares with V 

phis, which is yet well satisfied with it- system of sew. 

Mr. Latrobe, of Baltimore, makes a practical suggestion hi 

dally in cities that have public steam h it applicable 

special arrangement to have a small steam 

coil in each flush-tank to thaw it out or prevent its freezing in 
Be, after a very intelligent discussion of the 
'cates the small pipe or Wa em for Baltimore. 

:on of the subject I have ever seen.* The 
tion to la ■_ well put. 

•Although their slope may be good, and with the standard rain- 
fall ample for cleansing, the Bection of the stream ordinarily 
small, compared with I by 

-fluid refuse that they cannot fulfill efficiently what we have 
,iily the office of a sewer, viz.: to carry at once to the 
outlet whi into it. The result is tha 

alon_ :dy. fermenting and generating the mosl noz 

. y rain tad or ar, i 
>n. The ca- is also be cry foul in dry 

weather, and even when trapped th< oken by 

litting the exit of noxious an I 
iiese con the large unfilled area of the Be 

which, h if the first h< 

sudden ru jh oi w 
c point, notably through the traps of h into 

- 

era! intellij jing 

of t 

a. sounding to on< ig kettle. 

in, when 

•A rej*>rt t<» tha mayor and D a plan of r liaJtlraore Citj. 



26 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

most perfect development, and we cannot expect anything very 
much better under it, are also well urged. 

The better condition of the sewage for utilization under the 
"Waring system, when finally delivered at the outlet, the value 
of storm-water in clearing the streets, and the care of providing 
for it in other ways, are, as well as the expense, arguments in fa 
vor of the small pipe system. 

"This very difficulty of deciding on a proper basis of rainfall in 
designing combined sewers, is in itself considerable. If possible, or 
even probable, storms are taken as a basis, the sewers become tun- 
nels, expensive and ill-contrived, for the ordinary flow of sewage. 
If a compromise is taken (as is generally done) of one-half an 
inch per hour entering the sewer the result is almost inevitable 
that at times the lower levels, and sometimes the higher levels, are 
deluged with sewage, and new and expensive works have to be 
undertaken to supplement the old. In proof of this both Brooklyn 
and Providence will have to build — and are building — new sewers 
devoted to storm-water alone, and in Providence, at least, based 
on double the rainfall used in preparing the original system." 

In fine the greatest objection to the large sewer system, is in- 
capacity to carry off all the storm-water even at elevations of one 
hundred feet above tide, and consequent gorging.* Where the 
branch sewers have a very rapid inclination a main, although pro- 
portioned correctly, has been known to gorge in four minutes af- 
ter water began to run in the gutters. This gorging creates a 
back flow through kitchen sinks and basement water-closets; the 
houses are invaded by sewage during heavy storms, man-hole cov- 
ers lifted, and sewage poured into the middle of the streets. 

He advises irrigation for the final disposal of the sewage, and 
gives a resume of Corfield's arguments in favor thereof. This 
subject was pretty fully discussed in relation to the disposal of the 
sewage of Meriden in our second report. It is a satisfaction to learn 
that the irrigation plan which this Board then unqualifiedly en- 
dorsed is gaining in favor, and is recommended for so large a city 
as Baltimore of nearly five hundred thousand. As we have so of- 
ten recommended the system, its success is satisfactory. Memphis, 
Denver, Cumberland Mills, Maine, Lenox, Mass., and probably other 
places already have the system fully established., Stamford will 
have her system soon completed. New Orleans has voted to con- 
struct sewers after this plan, as well as several other cities. The 
plan certainly is perfect theoretically, as the sewage is carried to 
the outlet so rapidly and fully that no gases have a chance to form. 
One essential element for success is mentioned by Mr. Latrobe, the 

* Condensed ; not a verbal quotation from this through. 



report OF Tin: state hoard of health. 27 

eify should invariably maintain control «»f t' i. should 

; It. 
Thoroiigh and systematic drainage, a< well.i ;■•. la onq 

tionablv a sanitary measure; as certain as any tiling can be in this 
variable world, to result in a general improvement in the health, 
fulness of any place that carries it out thoroughly. The subsoil 
and ground-water may l»e stagnant and require attention as well 

as thl Indeed the unhealthfulness of any place is 

perhaps as often connected with stagnation of the subsoil water as 
of that upon the surface: that explains why a hillside or elevated 
plateau may be as good a region for malaria as lower ground, in- 
history of the malaria around Rome obliges one to 
question the paludal theory as strongly as its manifestions in Con- 
necticut, for the hilly regions were there as much, if not more, af- 
fected than the lowlands. A house upon a hillside may be much 

drained than a house in a valley or along a stream, for in one 
case the constantly in motion, and in the first instance 

rnant This of course is Dot always the case, depending upon 
the gelogical formation, but is much oftener than one would sup- 
pose. New Milford with the advice of the Board has, in connec- 
tion with a provision for sewerage, made a great improvement in 
the local drainage; a map and sketch is given of this also. They al- 
ready had one large drain for the central street, and have shown 
a very commendable spirit in carrying out public improvements. 
Every instance of this kind is of value and worthy of record, for 
its own sake as well as for its influence upon others who, seeing 
the good results that follow such measures, will be encouraged to 
do likewise. It is our intention to give as full an account as pos- 
sible of all the sanitary work of a public nature done in the si 
There are several other towns agitating the question of sewage and 
preparing the way for the work: each has its features of local in- 

It. Hartford has carried t fa large trqj 

through a cove to the river current. shown in the 

drainage map of the Connecticut and Housatonic survey. TJ 
a great improvement. Other trunk sewers are in process of con- 

•tion that will remedy the evil- that am :' not 

the whole city. These are preparatory og with 

sanitary problem that must be solved sooner or lab 

• of Park river, whether to keep it an Q] th an un- 

obstructed course or to purify it by removing all sewage 
trunk sewer. New EJ| ^paring to deal with a very crooked 



( 



28 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

river with hundreds of acres of swamp meadow which affords a 
chance for a vast amount of sanitary work. The results, however, 
will more than compensate the necessary outlay. Other minor im- 
provements have been made as occasion has arisen. Wallingford 
and other towns are preparing to introduce a public water supply. 
In fact there is considerable activity all along the line. There is 
more need of systematic drainage, especially when natural water- 
courses have been interrupted, and the free movement of the 
ground-water hindered, where instead of a constant movement to- 
wards water courses and the sea, it is set back and rendered stag- 
nant by embankments, reservoirs, railroad gradings, and similar 
agencies, 

POLLUTION OF STREAMS. 

There seems to be a need of farther legislation upon this sub- 
ject, especially when the water is so contaminated by manufactur- 
ing wash and sewage as to be detrimental to health. An instance 
is described in the report, where there was a large quantity of 
decaying wood, principally brush- wood, in a brackish stream, that 
is a fresh-water river into which the tide sets. These were 
partially uncovered at low tide and produced a very sickening 
odor as described by all those living near. Oftener, however, sew- 
age and the waste from factories and manufacturing establishments 
make up the polluting materials. The laws perhaps are sufficient 
to protect reservoirs and streams used for water supply of cities and 
towns. Except, perhaps, there should be a law relating to the lo- 
cating of slaughter-houses and nuisances near such sources of pub- 
lic water supply. If this location be left to boards of health, as 
suggested in the last legislature, the difficulty might be obviated. 
It may be impossible to meet the other matter by any general law, 
settling each special case by a special enactment. However that 
may be it would seem to be an axiom that a town ought to be able 
to protect the purity of the streams flowing through it and to con- 
trol them for sanitary purposes. 



EEPOET 



OP THE 



Ninth Annual Session 



OF THE 



AMERICAN 

PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION. 



THE AMERICAS PUBLIC BEALTE ASSOCIATION. 



In accordance with the action of the State Board of Health the 
following report of the ninth annual meeting of this association is 
here presented : 

The meeting was held in Savannah, Georgia, from Tuesday, X >- 

Teml until Friday, Decern her 2d. The attendance was 

mting the most prominent sanitarians from all parts 

of the Union. The papers were generally interesting and of 

permanent value, and the discussions lively and practical. A 
mere catalogue of all the papers present ■<! would take up too much 

•. nor is it possible to give a brief of the views presented on 
the various topics discussed. It will, therefore, only be attempted 
to present a general idea of the nature of the proceedings, with a 
review of some of the points presented in papers of special interest 
and importance. 

d George A. Mercer presented the address of welcome on 
behalf of the city of Savannah in a very eloquent, and appreciative 
address, giving incidentally a graphic picture of the terrors of the 

scourge of yellow fever. Dr. R. J. Munn addressed the 

n on behalf of the Georgia medical society in a very 

felicitous manner, extending a cordial welcome. The genial 

mayor of the city, John F. Wheaton, who, I y. is a son of 

Com and has served his city as mayor some fifteen years, 

d-d at this session, ai. :;tro- 

fchen gave the annual 
address in a masterly manner. Aft.-r a feeling tribute to the hon- 
ored dea<; the 
difficult* I t!i»- 68X1 

and woeful d and 

thor taring whi 

ing up among m 

■ I • tir, :. Lamination of similar ;it- 

mimal mat! 



32 REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

and dead, but he bethinks himself of the arrangements for entangling 
much of this matter before it reaches the ultimate air-cells, and especially 
of that wonderful lining tissue of the lung, which with chemical pre- 
cision lets in oxygen and lets out carbonic acid and vapor of water, yet with 
such certainty retaining the blood upon the other side, that one may see 
a thousand cases of that dread destroyer of texture and blood, yellow 
fever, and see but a single case of hemorrhage from the lungs, and even 
that in one already a consumptive. Such reflections naturally suggest 
the widely diverse nature of individual and race hygiene. In the ship- 
wreck we see a single person outlasting all others of the company, de- 
fying flaming sun and winter's rigor, the pangs of hunger and the an- 
guish of thirst, or the victim of severe accident, 'groaning with the 
groans of a deadly- wounded man,' yet seemingly finding it impossible 
to die, and to the amazement of all lookers on, and in spite of our malign 
prophecies, recovering health, and again doing his part of the world's 
work. This limitless endurance, this clenched tenacity of life and 
enormous vitality, are at once the evidence and result of race 
hygiene. These much-enduring diseases, death-resisting specimens of 
the human family, show what a succession of fortunately environed gen- 
erations can develop." 

The lack of recognition of the value and importance of the work 
done by sanitarians was alluded to as shown by the meagre recom- 
pense afforded. Sanitary science has reached that point where 
farther advance can only be secured by the expert, and he must 
be furnished by the State. The amateurs have done their part. 
When the care of the individual and the citizen is secured, then 
problems that involve neighboring States comes for solution, and 
hence the need for a central or national organization to work in 
this vast field. 

Instruction in primary hygiene and the truths of sanitary sci- 
ence must be given in the schools to develop workers in this field, 
and there lies a vast work at our own doors to popularize in every 
way what is already known of sanitary truth. This brief abstract 
can give but a feeble idea of this fine address; it must be read in 
full to be appreciated. 

The papers of the first day were given to the contagious diseases 
of cattle and those diseases of the lower animals communicable 
to man. Anthrax, Texas fever, trichinae, and similar topics were 
discussed, after the subjects had been treated by able papers, sev- 
eral on each principal topic. As we are going over this ground 
systematically, the paper on trichinae this year, by Dr. Cressey, 
succeeding that on the communicability of tuberculosis last year, 
there will be no necessity for more than mentioning these papers. 



REPORT OF THE 9TATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 88 

A paper on the comparative vital movement of the white and col- 
ored races, by Dr. S. S. Herrick, of N. 0., Bhowed the birth 
rate of the negroes to be higher than that of the whites, be© 
with a higher mortality they were ye1 increasing. The Macks 
are less liable to cancerous diseases, and delirium tremens in a 
still more marked degree, suicide; rare; on (lie contrary they 
more Bubject to consumption and acute Lung diseases. The last 
census correct^ the erroneous idea that the African race is des- 
tined to disappear from this continent. 

Dr. Miles. i)( Cincinnati, gave a very interesting account of the 
Bunstroke mortality there in L881. This showed, contrary to the 
genera] opinion, that a hot, dry atmosphere was more conducive to 
sunstroke. The Large number of cases, 288, afforded a fine field 
for study. Temporary hospitals scattered over the city to avoid 
transportation, were shown to have been effectual in lessening 
mortality. The hoi water treatment was unsuccessful in marked 
congestive cases, the only ones in which it was tried. The heroic 
treatment, by dec}) injections hypodermically of aqua ammonia 
diluted one fifth, was advised in desperate cases. 

A paper written by Dr. J. F. Adams, of Pittsfield, on malaria 
in New England, was read, in his absence, by the secretary. 
Dr. Azel Ames. The rate of progress was stated as from two to 
thirty miles yearly ; the most rapid progress in the hottest and 
dryest years. (In this State the most marked increase has been in 
the succeeding year after an unusually hot and dry season, as has 
been more often reported.) The subsidence of typhoid fever and 
its increase again last year, were noted. The greater prevalence 
along water courses was noted, and the statement from our 
monthly reports quoted, that its influence was mainly felt along the 
river valleys, and much more rarely in high and dry localities, al- 
though stated much more strongly than thcie in regard to the 
■.prion of the highlands. Rivers, ponds, and reservoirs, especial- 
ly rivers with marshy hanks and overflowed bottom lands, and the 

cxp> ted as factors, deciding its location, 

and mud, than w, 

::tial in inllu pent. Next to rivers and 

ir were i 

il«- in malaria. As v. ill 1..- ~. .-n. | 

session, owin<^ to delay in 



34 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

reaching Savannah by an accident on the road, a paper was read 
by the secretary of this board, presenting essentially the same 
views as are given later in the paper on malaria. These papers 
drew out, both of them, a very lively and interesting discussion, 
as a large section of the southern members are strong believers in 
the theory of local origin. Dr. Campbell, of Augusta, Ga., held 
that malaria had always existed, but so intimately blended with 
the typhoidal element as to be scarcely distinguishable, instancing 
the difficulty of diagnosing sometimes in cases of typho-malaria 
fever. 

One of the most interesting and instructive papers was by Hon. 
Erastus Brooks, a member of the New York State Board of 
Health. I wish I could reprint it entire and send it into every in- 
telligent family in this State. The following brief quotations give 
some idea of the nature of the essay. Speaking of Diphtheria 
and Scarlet Fever, he says : 

" Inspectors, teachers, and parents, to arrest diseases like these, owe 
some service to the State. Among these duties are : non-communication, 
isolation, safety to exposure from draughts and colds, the strict avoid- 
ance of impure water, the disinfection when required of clothing, rooms, 
workshops, dwellings, and of all exposed places. Where fire and heat 
are not applied to get rid of what is offensive, effective disinfectants 
must be used, and when death comes there must be no public or family 
funeral. To save the lives of the living by such means shows no want 
of sympathy for the dead or for the living, but just the contrary. One 
bad case of diphtheria neglected in the school-room, the sick room, or 
the dead room, may lead to a hundred graves. The true parent, the 
wise friend, the honest citizen will see that these exposures so often 
caused by ignorance or false sympathy are prevented by the strictest 

non-intercourse The homes of the people are the real 

sources of happiness, and what is best for health should be established 
and recognized there, and in properly constructed workshops, school- 
rooms and churches. In the latter, physiology and physic may at times 
enter into that divine philosophy which teaches the ways of God to 
man. In a country like Belgium, the average lives of the cleanly and 
thrifty are fifty years, and of the filthy and negligent the average length 
of life is only thirty-two years, and Belgium in this respect is not a 
peculiar country. I read also in 13 towns of England of a decrease of 
more than 17 per cent, in the death rate from proper sewerage alone. 

" The head of every house should be practically a health inspector. 
Open the doors and windows of your dormitories that the air of heaven 
may enter therein. Banish from your dwellings all possibilities of con- 
tamination from effete matter, all noxious and miasmatic gases from 



UP0B9 Of mi: BEAT! BOARD OF iikalth. 
ii decomposition resulting from soil and sewer pipes. A little can 

will -hut out tilth And make room lor tin- vigor of health." 

A paper of permanent interest, by Dr. Polaom, was. in the ai>- 
tuthor, read by title only. In view <>f its practical 
ire, it was printed in the reports of the session, ami the follow- 
ing points are taken from it : 

The low rate of mortality from insanity is first noticed The 'hat lis 

from typhoid ferer in Massachusetts an- ten times as many each 

from canoei five times SS many, from alcoholism not far from the - 

number. The total number of insane petaoae in the State i- less than 

the number dying each year from consumption. The increased fatality 

from insanity, apoplexy, paralysis, and diseases generally of the nervous 

-mi daring the last twenty year- too plainly indicates where the 

strain from our too complex and exacting life falls. The proportion of 
those insane increased in 80 year- from 12.13 in every 100,000 of the 
population of the State to 17.51. This -hows an increase m insanity, 
but not exactly proportionate to these figures, for if there were a com- 
fortable asylum at hand they would be tilled op to .1,000 instead of the 
— i»i in hospitals, but part of the increase is due to a better 
enumeration. In England, the increase in the pauper insane in the last 
82 y f the self-supporting, 80£ in 1881, B9jf of the inssne a 

hence it would appear that the causes that produce insan- 
ity were more active at the bottom of the social scale. 

•'In Mas-. State Hospital for the insane, of 9381 males 114 were in 
'.. <>f 4.t'»?:') women M were school girls, 166 buys and girls were of 
the school age. Insanity not only prevails at a time of life when the 
-train of mind and body is L'reat. but al-o where the effort i> the most 
intense. The antecedents of insanity are complex ami obscure; the al- 
leged causes vary with the theories of those recording them. There i-, 
however, a general agreement that whatever they are they are <>f long 
standing and slow development In Mass., drunkenness and its effect 
upon o ff sprin g stands easily first 111 health has been advancing as the 
population has become more concentrated, until it stands easily second. 
iity ranks fro: Cording to different observers. There 

can be no doubt but that it is one of tie- most potent and mo-t frequent 

of the direct causes of insanity . There are two points to be kept in 
view in the prevention of insanity : l>t. The avoidance of an accumu- 
lation of chronic insane by cure of tie- disease in it- early stages, and 
ily th<- prevention of tir-t attacks of mental diet 
u The importance of the hygiene of infancy was discussed, the dan- 

of School life, the had air. hurry, worry, and strain, too many 

. hes ot" study, over stimulation by competitive examinations, insuf 
1 from lack of time, evil habits through • lioriatancy to which 

they are driven by a morbid imagination. Syphilis i 



I 



36 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

insanity than enforced celibacy. Impure relations of the sexes is a 
prominent factor in producing certain forms of insanity. At the sus- 
ceptible period of brain activity, comparatively little mental disease need 
be feared if time enough be taken for food, healthy exercise, sleep, and 
recreation. If insanity threaten, the best means of avoiding it is in a 
healthy body and well trained mind." 

There were many other valuable papers read, but time and space 
forbid their discussion. 

A pleasant excursion down the river varied the exercises by an 
opportunity for social relaxation that was appreciated by all. 

There were important discussions on many interesting sanitary 
questions, from reports of committees and arising incidentally. 
Professor R. C. Kedzie of Mich, was elected President; Dr. E. M. 
Hunt of New Jersey, 1st Vice-President ; Dr. A. L. Gihon, U. S. 
Navy, 2d Vice-President. The Secretary, Dr. Azel Ames of 
Mass., is elected for three years ; the efficient treasurer, Dr. J. 
Berrien Lindsley of Nashville, Tenn., was re-elected. The next 
session is held in Indianapolis. There should be many more mem- 
bers from this State. 



AN ACCOUNT 



OF 11 IK 



MOVEMENT FOR OBTAINING SEWERAGE 






IN TIIK 



BOROUGH OF STAMFORD 



BY 



HENRY R. TOWNE, 



BTAMFOltD. 



THE SEWERAGE OF STAMFORD. 



The Town of Stamford, Connecticut, has every natural condi- 
tion needed to make it a healthful place of residence. It is 
located upon a deposit of gravel, extending over its whole area 
and of great depth. It has very little marshy or undrained ground 
within its limits, and had originally a clear and rapid fresh water 
stream upon its western boundary emptying into Long Island 
Sound, the shore of which latter lies about a mile south of the 
town 

By abusing nature's provisions, man has converted these health- 
ful provisions into conditions the reverse of sanitary, and has 
continued this shortsighted and suicidal policy, until the health of 
the inhabitants of the town has been seriously affected, and the 
conviction brought home to its residents that speedy and vigorous 
measures of reform are necessary for their self protection. 

The movement of reform first took definite? shape in September, 
1880, by the meeting together, informally, of some twenty or 
thirty of the larger tax payers of the Borough of Stamford, for a 
discussion of the subject, and the consideration of how best to 
obtain relief. At this meeting a thorough discussion of the matter 
was had and a free interchange of opinions as to the best mode of 
providing for the. proper sewerage of the town took place. Rec- 
ognizing that, in this, as in almost everything else, the sinews of 
war are money t a fund was raised, by voluntary subscription, with 
which to defray the expense of a proper survey of the borough, 
and the preparation by a competent sanitary engineer of a com- 
prehensive pis ..-rage. Tie- fund thus obtained amount, d 
.to a of which was expended for the purposes a 

. the committee having 
of i. rge K. Waring, - N 1 1 B I.. 

• fully m\ the spol 

;. With the data t:. and 

1 by a topographical map of the borough, Colonel Waring 



40 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

designed a system of sewerage intended to cover all the built up 
portions of the borough of Stamford as then constituted. A re- 
production of the map prepared by Colonel Waring accompanies 
this paper. 

Having obtained Colonel Waring's report, which included an 
estimate of the cost of carrying out the plan of sewerage which 
he advised, the committee, under whose auspices his report had 
been made, united in a request to the borough officials that a pub- 
lic meeting should be called for the consideration of the subject. 

At this meeting, which was held on the evening of November 
12, 1880, Colonel Waring's report was read and the map accom- 
panying it was exhibited by a stereopticon, and fully explained by 
one of the committee. A free discussion of the matter followed, 
during which it appeared that a division of sentiment existed, 
many persons strongly advocating the project for obtaining sew- 
erage, while others as strenuously opposed it. Finally the subjects 
under discussion were embodied in two resolutions as follows: 

1st. " Resolved, That it is desirable that a system of sewerage 
for the borough be adopted," and 2d. "Resolved, That it is the 
sense of this meeting that it is desirable to provide an effective 
system of sewerage for the borough; that the plan proposed by 
Colonel Waring commends itself favorably, so far as the facts 
have been submitted, to this meeting, but that it is desirable that 
other plans be considered, and that therefore a committee be ap- 
pointed who shall investigate the whole question and report to a 
subsequent meeting of the borough." Both of these resolutions 
were passed, and a committee of seven was appointed in pursuance 
of the second resolution. 

The adjourned meeting was duly held and the following report 
submitted by the committee appointed by the preceding meeting. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE. 

The committee appointed at the Special Borough Meeting, held 
November 12, 1880, respectfully report as follows: 

The only matured plan for sewerage which has been submitted, 
is that of Col. Geo. E. Waring. The committee, however, has 
informally considered the other plans which seem possible of 
execution under the conditions obtaining in Stamford. 

Under the old, or " storm water" system of sewerage, the 
sewers must be large enough, not only to carry the sewage, but 
also the surface or storm water of the streets, for which latter 




STAMFORD 

CONNT 

Plan of Pboposed Sewers. 



IS 

inf 
exr 



Be 

al 



REPORT OF Tin: STATE BOARD Of HEALTH. 11 

■ ban would be 

for i ly. The 

■ugh, would probably amounl to from 
1,000 to $300,000 cally 

; ■ further excluded 
from lition of our 

Without die the borough to bear so hei 

a financial bui can be safely stated that tin- voters of the 

to the incui 

of any such If this is so, obviously the only 

way of providing , r o is by the adoption of some 

plan by which the total cost thereof may be kept within a moder- 
ate limit, say not i u0,000. The plan proposed by I 

1 from the i: >ns thus 

mmittee knows of no plan essentially diffi i 
fmm this, the cost of which would not be materially greater. 
,:i provides sewers of sufficient capacity, as he 
effectually dispose of all house sewage, and extend- 
ing to all parts of the borough. N 

and therefore none can be less i re, for there is nothing in 

>pecial or peculiar, other than the flush 
e cost of which is a small item. The resort to pumping 
your committee reg - unques- 

tionaUy expedient to be adopted, if. y many (inch; . 

i. some portions of the borough lie so low as to make 
it impose er them without it. Undoub; 

some portions of the boro red without pumping, 

and ' ne so far as possible in the carrying out of 

whatever plan may 1 re are other parts of the 

r, which lie so low as T '» make it doubtful if I 
■ and efl . without 

such low 
in order to effec* 

trilling cost of j this 

with whi 

trying out 
of coi River, b 



42 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

Main street to the lower bridge, or perhaps still further south, in 
order to receive and carry off the waste products of the woolen 
mill and thus prevent the further pollution of the Mill River. The 
adoption of this plan will largely diminish the amount of sewage 
passing through the pumping station, not only by removing from 
the latter the large volume of impure water discharged from the 
woolen mill, but also by enabling some of the lateral sewers in the 
western part of the borough to be discharged into the proposed 
large sewer in the river bed. The arrangement and carrying out 
of this matter should, of course, be left to the consideration of 
whatever engineer may be employed for the final execution of the 
work. Adding an ample allowance to cover the cost of it to the 
amount of Col. Waring's estimate, the total cost of sewerage will 
still be found well within $100,000. 

Your committee therefore would make the following recom- 
mendations, viz. : 

1. That the necessary authority be obtained from the next Gen- 
eral Assembly for the construction, by the board of Warden and 
Burgesses, or by such persons as the latter may empower, of an 
effective sewerage throughout the borough, provided that the cost 
thereof shall not exceed $100,000. 

2. That authority be obtained also for the issuing by the bor- 
ough of bonds, to an amount not exceeding $100,000, payable in 
not exceeding twenty years, to be issued in sums of from $25 to 
$1,000 each, and to be offered for thirty days to the citizens of 
the borough, the proceeds of said bonds to be applied only to 
defraying the cost of said sewerage; the question as to how much, 
if any, of the expense sjiall be defrayed by direct assessment 
being left for future consideration. 

3. That a committee be appointed to present the proper memo- 
rial to the next General Assembly, and to secure the passing of 
the necessary legislation at the earliest practicable date. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William T. Minor, ~) 

Henr^ R. Towke, i n m M ... . 

Wm. W. Skiddy, 

E. L. SCOFIELD, J 

This report was accepted by the meeting and ordered on file. Sub- 
sequently, the following resolution was unanimously adopted: 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOABD Of iikai.th. I I 

. That ■ committee be appointed by this meeting to prepare 
and present t<> the nexl Beeeion of the General Aaaembl] of this Btate 
■ proper and suitable bill, authorizing and empowering the Warden and 
Burgesses of this borough to adopt and provide a general system of 
Bewerage for -aid borough, subject to the approval of the freemen of 
said borough, at a cost not to exceed sinn. ooii, and to issue bonds to 

an amount not exceeding said BUm, in tin- name and on tin- faith of said 

borough, payable in installments, within not exceeding twenty • 
to he issued in Bums of from $35 to $1,000 each, and which when issued 
shall l>c offered tor thirty days to the citizens of the borough. The pro- 
Mid bonds to be used in defraying the cost of said Bewerage; 
and further empowering said Warden and Burgesses to appoint Buch 

person or persons as they may select, to have charge and control of the 
construction of -aid sy-tem of Bewerage, and also to make and establish 

Buch rules and regulations tor the proper use and management thereof 

as they may deem necessary and expedient. 

following resolution was also adopted: 

BtfSofoetZ, That a committee o( three, to be named by the Warden, 
shall be appointed immediately, who shall report to this meeting, with 
as little delay as possible, the names of such persons, citizens of this 
borough, as in their judgment archest qualified to constitute the com- 
mittee to draft a memorial and to present the same to the next General 
id for the purposes specified in the resolution previously 
adopted by this meeting. 

( )n motion, the report of the committee appointed at the special 

ing, held Nov. 12, was adopted. 
The committee 1 appointed to report names of suitable persons to 
draft bill to present to the General Assembly, reported the follow- 
ing names: Henry R. To wne, Julius C. Ourti- H. Olmstead, 
K. L Scofield, C. M. Holly, Thomas G. Hitch, and Wm. W.Skiddy. 
motion, the report was accepted. 
On motion, the name of the Warden was added to said com- 

"6. 
< In motion, it was ordered that the nan kid eointi 

ted in the resolution I under which they were ap- 

"i motion • adjoorni 

K. W. BIKER, Borxmgh Ckrk. 

Tl. thus appointed duly pn ! in 

accor >lution under which they 



44 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

were appointed, and presented the same to the Genera* Assembly 
at its last session. After some amendments, the bill was finally 
approved by the Joint Committee on Cities, and passed by both 
branches of the Assembly, finally becoming law by the addition 
of the signature of the Governor. 

By this time, however, the season had so far advanced as to 
make it inexpedient to attempt anything further at that time. Even 
had public sentiment been ready for the commencement of the 
work, it would have been hazardous to have attempted it during 
the summer months, as the upturning of the streets and other 
digging involved would not only have been very inconvenient, but 
might have largely augmented the suffering from malarial poison- 
ing. "Work of this kind should, if possible, be prosecuted in cold 
weather, and in a town not larger than Stamford can by proper 
management be effected during the cool months of the fall and 
spring. 

During the summer that followed, a new cause of disease and 
danger developed itself in the town. The Mill River, which forms 
the western limits of the borough, had originally been a clear and 
rapid stream, but had been changed by the construction of two 
dams — one near its mouth and the other a half mile higher up. 
At the latter point there is located a large woolen mill, which 
utilizes the water from the upper dam, occasionally for power, but 
chiefly for washing wool. The water thus used is discharged from 
the mill in a condition hard to describe. It carries with it a vast 
amount of grease and animal matter removed from the dirty wool, 
together with the alkalies and other chemical agents employed in the 
separation of the greasy impurities. Added to this are the waste 
dye-stuffs, acids, and other refuse products of manufacturing, the 
stream as it leaves the mill being dark and turbid, and offensive in 
every way. The deleterious matters thus carried down are depos- 
ited on the banks and shoals of the stream below the dam, and, 
with the alternate rise and fall of the water, are alternately exposed 
to the action of the sun and air, and then again covered with the 
polluted water. 

In addition to this, the water in the upper dam, during the 
drought of the last summer, was for a long period constantly 
drawn down to so low a point (in order to supply the wants of the 
woolen mill) as to uncover the muddy flats which form the bottom 
of the upper pond, thus leaving the latter to the action of the sun 
during all the hot weather, and engendering a great amount of 



BBPOBT OP Tin: BTATE BOABD Of HEALTH. 16 

malarial ring in those portions of the town | 

oent to the pond. 
These evila have been bo flagrant and Boobviom 

an almost universal demand for their e :. and in 

tin- i i re patent and imme 

danger public opinion has been Bomewl ed from the q 

vcr, that Bentiment on this point 
Ding, and thai many arc now awake to the UTgi D1 
of aewerage who a year ag at, to 

it. Obviously, however, it ble that in effecting th< 

of the town provision Bhonld be i 

of the pollution i ill River, and for piv. 

ereof. Unfortunately, the 
of this project may involve a v- penditure, additional to 

>st of th ;. and involves moreover (in i 

to elTeet it thoroughly) an enlargement of the limits of the 
bor< ond their The circumstances of the 

thus compel a simultaneous consideration and treatment of 
three distinct matters, each of them of large importance, and two 
\ a large expenditure of money. Public sentii 
dy ripened to the point at which it would ;;• 
the : for dealing with any one of these emergencies e 

ly, but has hardly reached the point at which it is pr< 
grapple with all three simultaneously. The agitation is procee I 

. and the urgency is so great that it is hoped and be- 
1 that before long a plan will be devised and adopted wh< i 
all of the dangers which now I the public health of Stam- 

ford may be permanently removed, and the town restor 
natural healthful condition. 

It should be mentioned that a copious water supply was intro- 
duced some i ars ago, and that nearly all of the h> 
within the borough make use of this supply. The B< from 
s, without arged into leach: ools. 
While vital do not show a larger ratio of d 
Stamford than in other 1 is notor I the so-called 

within its limits 
during the pa corrobo: 

are □ fall typ] 



I 



46 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

adjacent to the river below the woolen mill, the water of which is 
polluted by the discharges from the mill. 

Appended hereto is Colonel Waring's report and other papers 
relating to the agitation of the question of sewerage in Stamford, 
which, with the foregoing, make a complete presentation of the 
matter up to the present time. 

Col. Waking's Report, 
the sewerage of stamford. 
Henry R. Towne, 

Chairman of the Committee of Forty: 
Dear Sir: Having gone carefully over the ground at Stamford, 
and having considered the same in connection with the controlling 
levels as shown by the " stereo-profile " of Mr. Fuertes, I beg to 
submit the following observations on the subject of sewerage to 
your borough. 

OUTLET. 

1 see no way in which the outfall of your sewers can be de- 
livered at any point in the harbor with even the probability that 
it will not become a nuisance to riparian owners, if not to those 
living some distance inland. The force of the prevailing winds 
and the action of the tides would doubtless combine, especially in 
the summer time, to prevent a complete outflow into the round, 
or even a complete deposit at the bottom of the channel. 

I have considered carefully the comparative merits of the use 
of the salt marsh between the canal and the Shippan road as an 
osier bed, and the alternative plan of delivering at some distance 
below low water mark in Westcott's Cove. 

I believe that the osier bed would be entirely satisfactory and 
that it would serve permanently as an efficient purifier of the sew- 
erage. At the same time it seems hardly wise to adopt any means 
for agricultural disposal so near to what is likely to become a con- 
siderable centre of population, and over which even now many of 
the prevailing summer winds pass on their way to the thickly 
settled part of the borough. 

To locate the osier bed at the other side of the Shippan road 
would make it too costly, as this would require a force main to be 
continued pretty nearly to the point of outlet in Westcott's Cove. 

Westcott's Cove seems to me to be entirely unobjectionable as 
a point of delivery if the simple precaution is taken to discharge 



MPORT OF Tin: BTAT1 BOARD OF iikai/iu. 17 

tbe outflow well beyond the lowest low-water mark. I ,; 
ieing in all respects th< 

I'l Ml 

The alight elevation above tide 

il absolutely indis] is of any sys- 

kern of Bewerage that the outflow should be pumped I tder- 

able height Not only must the discharge into the main outfall 
gin at b at height in a stand-] i cure the 

. fall — or what is equivalent to this, be forced by a cor- 
roding pressure directly into the outfall sewer — but it is 

msiderable artificial depth of outlet be provided 
near the center of population. 
I therefore recommend the establishing, at a point near the 
ot head of th Me canal, of a pumping-well of consid- 

le capacity and of sufficient depth to furnish a satisfactory 
.11 for a long line of sewer, beginning on South street, south 
of the New Haven railroad, running to the intersection of South 
Qtic streets, and thence to the canal. This will furnish a 
as of delivery for I :age of all that part of the borough 

lying south of the New Haven railroad and of the district betv 
Mr. George A. Hoyt's house and the crest of Clark's Hill, north 
of the railroad. 

In order to afford an equally effective means of outlet for 
main part of the borough, I recommend thai c of consider- 

able size and of I ided up Canal street, as far 

the vicinity of the old basin behind Quintard's block. 

This main can receive, in its course, the outlet of the sewers on 
Atlantic, Willow and South sti .1 their elevation 

south of Main street and the New Haven railroad. At its upper 
end it will receive one main og from \\ ; 

avci 

laterals, and other- ipper part 

of Atlantic street, and from th< with 

their 

:u from ta in my 

shov. anying sketch. It is quit that the 

Is which must betaken at intervals will a 

.1 not aft 

be work. 



1 



48 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

LATERAL SEWERS. 

I have sketched, in pencil, along the lines of the streets, as 
shown, the "buildings laid down on the sectional atlas of Stamford, 
and I have been guided by these in determining the points to 
which lateral sewers should be extended. These laterals should 
be in all cases of 6 -inch pipe with perfectly tight joints and should 
be laid, in most cases, at a depth of 5 to 7 feet, averaging rather 
less than more than 5 feet. They should continue of this size 
until they form an aggregate length of from 1,500 to 3,000 feet, 
according to their rate of inclination, and should then be increased 
to a diameter of 8 inches, and where several of them come 
together, as between the post-office and the head of the main 
sewer near the old basin of the canal, a somewhat larger size may 
be found necessary. 

DETAILS. 

The details of the work should be in all cases carried out in 
conformity to the work done in Memphis, which is described in 
the accompanying slip taken from an account of that work in the 
New York Herald, and outlined in a more general way in my 
paper on the subject, read before the American Public Health 
Association, in Nashville, November, 1879, of which a copy ac- 
companies this report. 

It will suffice for the preliminary consideration of the subject to 
rest the case on the description of the work contained in these two 
documents. 

SUBSOIL DRAINAGE. 

So far as my knowledge extends, there are few localities where 
artificial drainage at the depth of the sewers will be necessary. 
Should there exist places where the soil is retentive, it will be 
desirable to lay subsoil drains in the sewer trenches in the manner 
described in the report of the Memphis work. 

I believe that the method of sewerage herein recommended is 
in all respects suited to the conditions to be met. There are no 
local obstacles to the complete carrying out of the work, and I am 
confident that the enforced connection of every house with these 
tight sewers, thoroughly ventilated by their connection pipes and 
by their fresh-air inlets, and thoroughly cleansed by the daily dis- 
charge of sufficient flush tanks, together with the enforced cleans- 
ing and filling of all the privy vaults and cesspools in the village, 
will secure an absolutely perfect sanitary condition. 



BEPOBX 01 Tin: BTAT1 BOARD <>f hkaltii. 49 

It is sometimes assumed thai the Bupply of pure water from an 

• nee. remote from the possibility oi contamination, 

is all that is : for the sanitary Lmprovemenl oi a village 

Buffering from the effect of soil pollution. Certainly t he abandon* 
ment of drinking-water wells, which are invariably polluted where 

: in elose proximity to deposits of filth, is a very import* 
-unitary measure 1 ; but there is another way m which subter- 
ranean deposits of filth affect the health of the population most 

serioui dally bo in a gravelly soil like that of Stamford, 

It is only recently that account has been taken of the condition 
of the contained air of the soil. The experiments of Pettinkofer 

and Others have demonstrated the fact that the poisoning of this 
air by the infiltration of decomposing organic matter, has a most 
serious influence on the health of the population. You have 
yourself already called attention to the fact that, especially in 
winter when the surface of the ground is frozen quite up to the 
foundation of the houses, the houses themselves have a direct action 
for the drawing of this air from the soil. At other 
ills of the year the direct escape into the atmosphere is as 
as is that into the cellars, but during winter there can be no 
doubt that there is a very considerable constant fouling of the 
atmosphere of dwellings in the manner indicated. I would sug- 
gest further, that when heavy winter rains cause an elevation of 
the soil- water — as they undoubtedly do in a large part of your 
village — the contained air of the soil, unable to escape through tin; 
frozen surface, is forcibly driven into spaces, which, like the 
cellars of houses, are protected from frost and afford an easy means 
for its escape. 

Therefore, even though there may no longer be an unfavorable 
influence on the health of the people due to the contamination of 
their drinking water, there is no question that tin; atmosphere in 
which they pass most of the hours of the winter, is directly 
seriously -contaminated by organic impurities in tin; ground. 

ll«-re bs elsewhere! there is do bort of such radical 

improvement as will absolutely banish from within the limit 
the borough every manner of foul organic accumulation whether 
in the ground or upon it. 

So far I be world lias gone, the only m< 

ired, is by the construction 
«»f a from de] 

in a! 

7 



50 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



shall be driven well beyond the inhabited area within a very few 
hours after its production, and before its decomposition has even 
begun. 

I enter here into no argument against the construction of large 
storm water sewers, as that subject is sufficiently discussed in my 
Nashville paper, and as the mere fact of the far greater cost of 
such a system and the greatly increased difficulty of ultimate dis- 
posal which it entails seem to place it quite beyond your reach. 

In other words, I believe that a perfect sanitary condition can 
be secured only by the adoption of the system herein recommend- 
ed, and I believe that this system is the only one for which you 
would find it easy to provide the means. That your committee 
may be prepared to lay the subject before the people with all 
needed information concerning it, I append hereto an estimate of 
the cost of the work, which experience in similar soils leads me to 
consider a safe one. As many of your committee are much better 
qualified than I am to judge of the influence upon cost of the 
work of the boulders in the soil, I have based my estimate on the 
cost of construction in gravelly ground free from ledges or boul- 
ders of considerable size. This element must be added to the 
sum total. 

ESTIMATE. 



I estimate the total cost of executing the work, as 
and described, to be as follows, no allowance being 
contractor's profit: 
6,900 ft. 12 in. force main from the pump to the point 

of outlet n $1.60 per foot, \ 

2,200 ft. 18 in. pipe from the Canal basin south of 

Quintard's Block to the pump well, 05 $1.20 per 

foot, 

2,000 ft. 10 in. pipe sub-mains ft) 90 cts. per foot, 
14,000 ft. 8 in. pipe ® 50 cents, 
30,800 ft. 6 in. pipe ft 40 cents, 

10 fresh air inlets © $50, 

48 flush tanks ® $25, 

Royalty on same, ...... 

One 10,000 gallon flush tank at the head of the 18 

inch sewer, 

Royalty on same, 

Pump-well, pump, boiler, house, etc., . 



laid down 
made for 



1,0400 



2,640.00 

1,800.00 

7,000.00 

12,320.00 

500.00 

1,200.00 

480.00 

500.00 

100.00 

7,500.00 



REPORT OF THE BTATfl HOARD OF HEALTH. 61 

Making $45,080.00 

Add for contingencies 10 per cent., .... 4,608.00 

Making $49,588.00 

Add for engineering 15 per cent 7,438.00 

Making grand total $57,026.00 

The foregoing estimate does not include the cost of laying the 

house connection branches from the sewer to the line of private 

property. It does include the cost of the branch pieces by which 

these laterals are to be connected with the sewer, and as above 

stated, it does not include the additional cost of the work due to 

rock and boulders. 

Very respectfully yours, 

GEO. E. WARING, Jit. 
Newport, R. I., October 9, 1880. 



Some doubt having been expressed as to the efficiency of the 
rage system proposed by Ool. Waring, to properly carry off 
the S of Stamford, I desire to make a few explanatory 

imenta on this point. The velocity of the flow of water in 
- has been made the subject of exhaustive experimental 
research by Chezy, Eytelwein, Weisbach, and other eminent engi- 
B, so that the laws which govern it are now perfectly under- 
stood. The amount of water which will flow through a pipe of 
given size, having a given inclination and a given length, is there- 
not a matter of speculation or judgment, but an easily ascer- 
tble fact. The most important factor in determining the flow 
of water which only partially fills its pipe or conduit is the extent 
of what is called the u wetted perimeter,'' that is, the portion of 
the pipe or sewer which is touched by the water. The greater 
the proportion of wetted | i the volume of fluid to be 

r will be the 1 .1 the more slug- 

gish the flow. It is on account of that all lar.L r 

now con- ire built with an egg-shaped or oval cross-section, 

• <>f which u to diminish tl 

••■ase the depth of * c and the flow. 

son. in great part the day 

use : order t 

more rapid flow and obtain the resulting scouring action. Under 
Ian of large sewera tl. the solid mat- 



I 



52 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

ters of the sewage have abundant opportunity to settle and deposit 
on the bottom of the sewer. This action continues frequently 
until the greater part of the sewer is filled with solid matter, and 
hence this system involves the necessity of frequent man-hole 
openings, through which an entrance can be obtained to the sewers 
for removing their solid contents by hand. 

By the adoption of the smaller sewers proposed by Col. War- 
ing, a much greater velocity of flow is obtained than would be 
possible with large sewers. The rapid motion of the sewage thus 
obtained acts to prevent the deposit of its solid constituents in 
the pipes and enables it to keep up a continually scouring action, 
which tends to always keep the pipes free. 

Added to this is the daily flushing of every sewer by the auto- 
matic action of the flush-tanks, by means of which a large volume 
of water is constantly thrown into the upper end of every sewer, 
and which, rushing downward, carries with it and washes out any 
slight deposit which may have been formed. The amount of the 
solid constituents of sewage is usually very much over-estimated. 
As a matter of fact, the sewage of a town having a water-supply 
like ours is almost entirely water. This subject has been fully 
investigated by a government commission in England, with the 
result that the examination, by analysis, of the sewage of a large 
number of towns having a water supply, and in which water- 
closets were generally in use, being to show that the total solid 
matter amounts to but 72 parts in 100,000 parts of sewage, or, to 
state it differently, to 7-100 of one per cent. That is to say that, 
in 100,000 gallons of sewage, there was found but 72 gallons of 
solid matter. This statement is corroborated by the experience of 
any one who, in our gravelly soil, uses a leaching cesspool. Unless 
the walls of the cesspool become coated with kitchen grease and 
soap, so as to become partly impervious, the solid matter of the 
sewage will disappear entirely from the cesspool. In my own expe- 
rience, I have used such a cesspool (into which no soap or grease 
passes) for several years, and was never able to obtain from it any 
thing but clear water, although it received all the discharge from 
two water-closets which were in constant use. 

A certain minimum size is necessary in any drain pipe receiving 
water-closet waste, and experience has fixed this minimum at four 
inches diameter. We are so accustomed to using large drain- 
pipes that we are apt to underrate the carrying capacity of a six 
or eight -inch pipe laid with the average amount of inclination or 



HKPORT OP THK BTATE BOABD OF HEALTH* 
pitch. A six-inch sewer, having an inclination <>f <»ne foot in 100, 

will discharge, when running f nil. 4 l 75-100 cubic feet per min- 
ute. - equivalent t - » : > l : > gallons per minute, or 18,000 gal- 
lons per hour, or 432, 000 gallons per 'J J hours. It is thui - 
that l six-inch pipe, having an inclination of one foot in 100, if 

running full all the tune, is capable of carrying off * 

■/. with an ample margin to spare. The statist!' 
a large number of English towns a show that the aw 

quantity of sewage discharged per day per head of population 
varies from 10 to 70 gallons, the latter being a very exceptional 
The average rate usually accepted by engineers is from .'5<> 
to 50 gallons per head. Assuming the average family to com; 

• individuals, the total sewage discharge from each house 
would average from 240 to 40U gallons per '1 1 hours. Now, as a 
Qch pipe has a capacity, as above shown, of over 4 00,000 gal- 
lon-, every -4 hours, it is evident that a pretty large number of 
houses may safely depend upon a six-im for carrying off 

their ocularly a -barge from each house is vari- 

able and intermittent, so that it seldom happens thai there is a 
charge occurring simultaneously from all the houses on 
war. 
I trust the foregoing has made clear that, even with the sizes of 
pipes proposed, the plan of sewerage recommended by Col. War- 
ing has a capacity far in excess of any possible requirements of 
this town. . s rs are better than large ones because, by rea- 

son of their smaller capacity, the amount of decomposing matter 
within them is reduced to a minimum, and the amount of noxious 
crated by its decomposition thus proportionately decres 
trge sewer, on the other hand, contains a large amount of 
r suspended in a Blugg am of \v, 

and in contact with a large volume of contained air. thus pree 
ing every condition favorable to decomposition and the rapid gen- 
on of noxious gases. It is. in fact, a huge retort or g 
•he production of sewer gas, which latter, by means of 

tions. may be said to be u OH tap' in every house 
: with it. 
The system which Col. V. dvocates, ami which 

al, but dem< I by experience to be 

y adequate and 

[mum ao sew- 



I 



54 REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

as to ensure at all times a rapid and self-cleansing flow throughout 
their length, supplemented by a daily flushing of such character 
as to thoroughly scour and wash out the whole sewer from begin - 
ning to end. As a result, the excrement, grease, and solid filth of 
all kinds which enter the sewers are carried on and removed so 
rapidly and frequently that they remain in the sewers a few hours, 
at the longest, and are discharged before decomposition takes 
place. 

Reflection will convince any one that this is the ideal result to 
be attained in any system of sewerage. Under no previous sys- 
tem has it been even approximately attained. 

"The art of sanitary drainage may almost be said to have been 
born — or reborn — but a quarter of a century ago. Indeed, it is 
only within the past ten years that it has made its way in any 
important degree outside of purely professional literature." * * 
" Happily, men, and women, too, are fast coming to realize that 
humanity is responsible for much of its own sickness and prema- 
ture death, and it is no longer necessary to offer an apology for 
presenting to public consideration a subject in which, more than 
in any other — that is, the subject of its own healthfulness and the 
cleanliness of its own living — the general public is vitally inter- 
ested." 

We have long been accustomed to think of the air as being all 
above ground, but in this we have been gravely in error. The 
ground is porous, and it interstices are filled with air. This " ground - 
air " moves under the influence of wind pressure, differences in 
temperature and elevation, and other causes, so that poisonous 
emanations absorbed by it in one locality, as, for example, in the 
vicinity of a cess-pool or privy-vault, may be carried by it to 
another locality, as, for instance, the basement of a dwelling, and 
there be mingled with the air we breathe. 

On this subject Prof. Hartley of London, says : "It has been 
shown that the bulk of a gravelly soil consists of one-third air ; 
that is, the space between the stones and particles of sand which 
is filled with air amounts to one-half the space filled by the gravel. 
Let us now consider this soil to be the surroundings of a house, 
and imagine a drain leaking into such soil ; the ground -air would 
be charged with the products of decomposing offensive matter, 
and those abominations which are to be so much dreaded as the 
cause of zymotic diseases, [i.e., typhus and scarlet fevers, diphtheria, 
malarial fever, etc.] The house built upon this soil is full of 



mi: BOABD Of HKALTH. 
warm air, and ap the cliinm*-ys a draught rushes causing, when 

the doors and windows are closed in t ; rooms, a certain 

•mount of the ground-aii to enter by way of the fl< ying 

with it the germs of disease and peri th. M 

w, what i ? We have a \ 

avelly soil. We hare a COpioua artificial water supply, 

I of which, probably 200,000 to 300,000 gsJlom 
twenty-four h<>urs. is discharged through our numberL 
pools and drains into the soil, carrying with it the kitchen slops, 
grease, human excrement and other tilth from nearly every habita- 

within our limits. This enormous volume of filthy, put 

ble and animal matter we are daily 

•.ding farther and wider in through OUT porous soil, and thus 
bringing it more and more widely into contact with the ground- 
air in that soil, which air also BUrrounds and inevitably enters our 
dwellings. If it was our deliberate purpose to ruin the town by 
undermining the health of its inhabitants we could employ no 
more certain, effective, and in Man that we now 

have. The truth of t idenced by the experience 

of scores of towns and villages, here and in Europe, in which the 
inhabitants, after introducing an artificial water supply, have 
sought to utilize the soil beneath them for the disposal of their 
sewage, in order to avoid the expense of sewerage, and have been 
forcibly compelled to accept one of the three inevitable alterna- 

B, via. : ( 1) the abandonment of the artificial water supply ; or, 

:ie removal of filth by sewerage ; or, (3) the pusillanimous a< 
ance of general ill-health and high death-rate. The vital s 1 
tics of tv. _-iish towns, of populations ranging from 8,000 to 

'»0, show the following reductions in mortality after the intro- 
duction of sewerage, as compared with the death-rat' same 
towns before they :on of total d< 

er cent j ths from consump 

reduction in deaths from typhoid per cent A ■:■ 

system of sewerage may be more harm than good, but in the 
face of farts such as tl can argue against the desirability 

6f a we/ and well- m of sewerage ? 

The Borough of Sta iturally, one of t 

po&- • 1 our opportunities. DOW< 

e made that which shou] I 

ace t<> health and Lift 
ness in this has become noised about, and Stamford has be< 



I 



56 REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

associated with ideas of bad drainage, malaria, and general un- 
healthfulness. Whether well-founded or not, these reports have 
given Stamford a bad name, have retarded building within its 
limits, and have turned away strangers who have come here to 
look for homes. Proofs of these facts will be given to any who 
doubt the foregoing statement. In addition, therefore, to the 
incentive for action afforded by the desire we all have for health and 
long life, is the interest of property owners in the preservation of 
the value of their property. Beyond all doubt the value of prop- 
erty here is depressed by the facts above stated, and will be greatly 
enhanced by the completion of an efficient system of sewerage. 

With the data thus obtained, report shows that there are no 
obstacles to the establishing of a perfect system of sewerage in 
Stamford, and that the cost of the work will be much less than has 
heretofore been supposed. This latter fact is largely due to the 
adoption of "the flush tank system," invented by Col. Waring, 
and now in daily and successful operation in many towns, includ- 
ing all of those above named. This system consists in providing, 
at the head or starting point of each line of sewer, a " Field's 
flush tank," which is a small cistern, built entirely under ground, 
and containing a few barrels full of water. The water required is 
of trifling amount, and is obtained from the street mains by a 
simple automatic valve in each flush-tank. By an equally simple 
and automatic device the entire contents of each tank is suddenly 
dumped, once or twice every twenty- four hours, into the sewer, 
and rushing through the latter, scours it thoroughly, and carries out 
of it every particle of filth. The frequency of these "flushings" 
insures the removal of all organic matter from every sewer in a 
comparatively fresh condition, and before decomposition has com- 
menced. All accumulations of filth thus being guarded against, 
and no surface or storm waters being admitted, the size of the 
sewers can be greatly reduced. Experience shows that a six inch 
pipe is amply large enough for the first 2,000 or 3,000 feet of a 
line of sewer when thus frequently "flushed," and hence the great 
economy in cost of this system. The proposed plan of sewerage 
involves some 49,000 feet (9^ miles) of sewers within the Bor- 
ough, of which 63 per cent. (30,800 feet) will be 6 inch pipe, the 
remainder being 8, 10, and 18 inch pipes. In addition will be 
required 6,900 feet (1^ miles) of 12 inch force main for delivering 
the sewage from the pumping station to the point of discharge in 
the Sound. 



REPORT OF mi: STATE BOARD 01 BEALTH. . r >7 

the adoption of the pumping ill difficulties in the 

ird disappear. Without it, il is. im] 
blel A.Ttln' town. The cost of the pumping apparatus 

is included in the estimate, as ia also the cost of a suitable cov< 
collecting reservoir or sump, The pumping will do! ex* 

- 1.50 per day. everything included, and will probably be 
work required only equals that of four horse-power 
assuming the daily (low of sewage to be as big 
1,000 gallo 
Col. W alculation of the I 

0, not including any allowance for blasting nor for 

Adding a liberal margin for these and 

:• contingencies, (75,000 may be safely assumed as a sum 

which will cover the - I of the work, complete and ready 

for use. If this entire amount were assessed at once upon the 

owners oi property in front of which the sewers would pass, the 

. ouKl be only 77 per foot of frontage! 

Assuming, however, that bonds an- issued for the whole amount. 

• will be as follows, viz*: 

5 000 at •") per cent $3,750.00 

•f pumping, at $2.50 per day 018.00 

' xl.G&i.UO 

This - im is the equivalent o ■ day as the > 

I of sewerage. ( 'an there 

jiy doubt of our ability I this insignificant burden ? 

present Grand List of the Borough 7, so that the 

entire iirst cost of sewerage 15-100 ssed 

hrough. If bonding is resorted to 
and • .'} as abo\ :. an ad- 

ditional tax of \\ mills on the dollar will pay them. Our present 
igh tax i- at the i lis (an exceedingly low rate, 

so th in good condition to bear the slight increase 

v. and school, 1 1 mills. 
Adding • . amount inual exp 

lills) would make our ' 5 mills on 

dollar, or 1 i : much below the 

•age. The increase in ral >uld be only in 

more than much less, probably, 

than n!v trying to clean out our old 

and 
8 



58 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

One of the most important questions in connection with the 
proposed, arrangements for providing sewerage in Stamford, is 
that which concerns the mode of paying for the work. 

This question has been very fully discussed at the meetings of 
the committee appointed to consider the whole question of 
sewerage, and also at the earlier meetings of the committee at 
whose instance Col. Waring's survey, plan, and estimate were 
prepared. As I before stated, the entire first cost of the proposed 
system of sewerage would be met by an assessment of 77 cents per 
foot of frontage on the property abutting on the streets through 
which the sewers passed. This mode, however, would undoubt- 
edly be onerous to some persons, and unjust to a great many, for 
the reason that the distribution of the burden would be based 
wholly upon the frontage of property and not upon its value. A 
fairer way, therefore, would be to base the assessment upon 
property valuations, in the same manner as our taxes are now pro- 
portioned. Many objections have been made to this, however, 
including the very pertinent one that it would put a severe burden 
upon many of th,e smaller property owners, and one which they 
could not well meet. 

My own judgment in the matter is that the interests of all will 
be best served, and the burden be most equally distributed, by 
defraying the cost of sewerage by an issue of bonds, with provis- 
ion for the retirement of such bonds within a period of say twenty years. 
Assuming that bonds to an amount of even $100,000 are issued, 
the payment of them within twenty years would be amply 
provided for by an additional tax-levy of 1-J mills in each year, 
based on the present grand list. That is, a person whose property 
is assessed at $1,000 would be taxed $1.50 per annum, on account 
of the sinking fund for paying off: the bonds, and this small tax 
would in twenty years pay off the whole debt. As, however, the 
growth and development of the town will undoubtedly result 
hereafter, as in the past, in an increase of our grand list, the 
burden of this very slight extra taxation will be distributed over 
a constantly increasing number of taxpayers, and be based upon 
a constantly increasing grand list. In this way the expense of an 
improvement which is to be permanent, and for the benefit of 
the citizens for generations to come, will be spread over a period 
of twenty years, and be borne partly by the community as at 
present constituted, but partly also by those who become members 
of it during the period referred to. 



R1P0BI Of TH1 BTATK BOARD OF iikaltii. 59 

Our present t a xt*s here are Light, so tliit we are in excellent 

condition to assume the moderate a involved 

in providing ourselves with Bewera in with this added tax- 

d our total taxes here will be only <>f average amount, and 

Considerably smaller than in many Other places I COOld name 

The adoption of tin* plan above outlined will give us prompt and 
effective sewerage, and will provide for the paving off <>!' the debt 
created therefor within reasonable time, Leaving us afterwards 

with a complete system of sewers entirely paid for and belonging 
to the Borough, and involving DO further expense except the 

slight repairs and supervision required to keep them in good 
working order. 

In issuing the bonds it is proposed to offer them first in small 
amounts to the citizens of the Borough, so that all who wish them 
as a means of investment may obtain them. If any are untaken 
in this way they would then be offered to the banks. 

It is believed that this plan will commend itself to the intelli- 
1 favorable consideration of the community. It distrib- 
utes and equalizes the burden in the fairest possible way, and 
provides for the definite paying off of the indebtedness in a 
manner so easy as to make it hardly felt in our taxation. 

To say nothing of the benefits resulting to the community in 
health and in the increased value of property, I believe that the 
cost of the work as above distributed will, in the average consti- 
tute a burden but little greater than our present annual expend- 
itures for the cleaning out of our present cess-pools and drains, 
and the construction of the new ones which are made necessary 
by the fouling and choking up of old ones. The financial 
-tion has apparently been always the main difficulty in regard 
to the introduction of sewerage. Under the plan above out- 
lined this difficulty disappears, and there no longer remains any 
obstacle to the immediate and effective sewering of the Borough. 



i 



SECEETAEY'S EEPOET. 



The past year has been one marked by increased activity and 
labor in nearly all of the departments that come under our charge. 
The ordinary correspondence has increased threefold this year, 
and there have been more than the usual number of special inves- 
tigations. The increase in personal interviews and consultations 
on sanitary subjects is an important feature; also the corre- 
spondence with local authorities in relation to small-pox. The 
malaria investigation shows for itself the time and labor involved. 
The microscopical work in relation to trichinae has been mentioned 
before. Examinations of the healthfulness of well-water and 
from other sources used for drinking have been frequent, more so 
than in both of the former years combined. In procuring a 
specimen from a well for examination, if possible a. quantity 
should be dipped from near the surface, one from the middle, and 
another quantity from the deepest portion of the well, and either 
equal parts of all three mixed and sent, or else a specimen of each. 
Curious results have often resulted from the neglect of this pre- 
caution. Thus, by accident, a sample of water from near the sur- 
face of a well was sent one chemist. He reported it as utterly 
unfit to drink and loaded with organic impurities; a worse sped-, 
men he had scarce ever encountered. To the second chemist, a 
portion from the bottom of the well was sent. After examination, 
he reported that it was the purest specimen he had encountered 
for some time, entirely free from organic impurities, or very nearly 
free, and no excess of mineral compounds. As can readily be 
imagined, great discredit was thrown upon both and upon their 
science, and the whole matter was declared to be unreliable. Yet 
each chemist was right, and in this case, fortunately, it was so 
proved; for a third took specimens personally, and, as his results 
agreed with neither, made another examination, and found three 
layers in the well. At the bottom there welled up a very cold, 
pure spring, and from the surface drainage, warmer and therefore 



BOABD Of BHALTfl. 61 

lighter water, thoroughly charged with a solution of tl -tilth 

•.•lit and of that in the soil, remain* I •■ •. while tl 
■ middle layer formed by the diffusion of the two. Of 
f there had been a fixed quantity in the well, and i 
removed, in process of time the water would have 
by diffusion; but i - all tin- while rut- 

in a- coming in from the spring the same condi- 

So, in examining the water from a river, 
lould be allowed r tinder the Mr 

but nut near enough the bottom t<> stir up the mud, not, as is 
rally tin king it from the surface only, and thus 

obtaining a U portion of any light floating objects and less 

of t: lc and mineral impurit 

The it lemand for the publications of the Board 

aire;: alluded to in the general rep< -it. 1 Jut exclusive of the 

annual reports, tl rid for the sanitary pamphlets of the 

Board hi ~ed during the year more than threefold. This 

is one of the most important of any of the undertakings of the 
Board, the dissemination <>t plain, practical facts about dia 
and its prevention and how ened danger. We 

are adding to our stock, year by year, such treatises as fasl 

- will allow. An enumeration of those relating to 
sanitary science will not be out of place, as most of them are in 
stock and can be had led for. If the importance of the' 

subject warrants it, upon the exhaustion of one edition aiioti.- 

i. with any improvements t: rience has suggested. 

Thus there have been three editions of the pamphlet on the ! 
»n of Diphtheria. 

1. < »n the General Nature and Scop<- of Public Hygiene. 

2. I 

3. On 1 and See i I t. J. S. But- 
ler. 

s. On the Prevention of Diphtheria. 

7. Tl 
8. 

10. 



62 REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

Copies of these are given for free distribution to responsible 
parties and sent wlterever likely to be read and to be useful through 
any special interest in the subjects upon which they treat, caused, 
for instance, by the unusual prevalence of the disease they describe. 
The large number of questions called out by their perusal from 
parties to whom they have been sent proves conclusively that they 
have been read and thought over. Thus, from the authorities of 
a majority of the places where small-pox has appeared, special 
instructions as to their powers and duties have been received, the 
pamphlet issued showing how to manage for individuals and fami- 
lies. In like manner, questions relating to the house and its sur- 
roundings have been received from those to whom the paper on 
Rural Hygiene was sent. 

In quite a number of instances we have given prompt and 
much needed information as to just where and how a supply of 
pure vaccine virus could be immediately procured, a matter of 
great importance where the work is to be done with authority as 
well as generally, as shown by Prof. Lindsley's paper. In cases 
of emergency we have forwarded supplies in response to telegrams, 
and thus aided in getting ahead of the dread disease. The import- 
ance and value of a central sanitary bureau has been repeatedly 
demonstrated this year and the spread of pestilence averted. The 
following letter illustrates this supply out of several similar. 

November 6, 1881. 
C. "W. Chamberljn, M.D.: 

My Dear Sir, — I thank you for the prompt and satisfactory 
response to my telegram of Saturday p. m. I ventured to send a 
second message this p. m., not knowing to whom else I might send, 
as I am not informed whether any agency for the sale of vaccine 
exists in Hartford. 

We have a case of confluent variola, occurring in a child of 
four years, whose parents reside in the center of our village. 
Contrary to orders, the father "exposed" several of our people, 
hence the panic which generally arises in a country town on the 
occurrence of such a case is in this instance greatly intensified. 

Indeed, under existing circumstances it seems desirable that 
certain people should be promptly and thoroughly vaccinated, 
hence my telegrams. 

Please give me definite information where and of whom vaccine 
may be procured; at what cost (if in quantity or otherwise), and 



REPORT Of THE STATE BOABD OF HEALTH. 

whether the would equal the demand if we make, in 

rdanoe with the direction of oui rd oi Health," a 

ough and systematic vaccination of the community, and should 
r by telegram. I trust if convenient you will promptly 

enlighten me. 

1 shall be very glad to receive vaccine to-morrow, as early in 

the day as possible. 

It is gratifying to learn that Merideo has completed a pest-house 
under the general plan of this Board, and that others are likely to 
follow suit. There should be a van connected with the pest-house 
arry patients thither, so that vehicles in common use need not 
be infected; also to transport articles to the disinfecting h 
connected with the pest house, if there be one, as there should. 

There is one point that might as well be mentioned here, and 
thai is. the need of some legal restrictions upon the transportation 
of the bodies of persons that have died of malignant contagious 
So far as 1 can learn, there is no direct provision upon 
The question has been asked by registrars whether 
they have the right to refuse permits in such cases. There appears 
no law authorizing them to refuse permits, the only provision on 
- that in relation to the refusal of permits for disinter- 
ments in certain months of the year of bodies that have been once 
buried is forbidden. Railroad officials have made the same inqui- 
ries whether they are under any legal penalty in carrying the I 
<»f a person that has died of malignant contagio'.- Prob- 

ably the force of public sentiment would prevent any one issuing 
a permit in case of a person dying from small-pox, nor would any 
railroad probably receive such a body. Hut the bo. lies of persons 
that have died from almost every other malignant disease 
transported more or less freely. I learned of one case where a 
child died from diphtheria: the body was removed, and * 
opened when fun- at the place of destination. 

- gave rise to several o- - and introduced ti 

W place, before free. hould be a law forbidding the 

-portation of such bodies unless thoroughly 
m of thecoffi] ; with sawdust m< with 

a di- .1 the body wrapped in a with the 

sulphate of si Aution,* whicl 

•Sol] common salt Booncee, to a gallon of water. 



< 



64 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

disinfectant, much more efficacious than carbolic acid, which in' 
ordinary solutions is worthless, and having another advantage in 
that it is cheaper and inodorous. 

Some provisions should also be made regarding the transporta- 
tion in public vehicles of persons having malignant contagious 
diseases, in order to protect the public health. Of course, in the 
absence of any vehicle for the express purpose, it might be diffi- 
cult to secure necessary transportation in some cases, so that while 
it may not be advisable to absolutely forbid the transportation of 
such persons, it should be required of the owner of the carriage 
that he disinfect it thoroughly after such use. Some provision 
with regard to public funerals in case of death from malignant 
contagious disease should be incorporated in the laws, or if too 
early for that, public attention cannot be too often called to the 
matter. It is surely no want of regard or respect for the dead 
to prevent any contact with the infected body or emanations from 
it, carrying sickness and death to friends and neighbors or attend- 
ants from scattering contagion over wide areas. Public funerals 
in such cases should be discountenanced in every possible man- 
ner. 

It is to be hoped that the increased number of the report to be 
issued this year will fully meet the demand at least in this State. 
Of our last year's report more than twice the number issued could 
have been properly distributed. Had it not been for the (as it 
proved) wise action of the Board in ordering at its own expense 
several hundred extra copies, we should have been unable to have 
supplied half the professional men, public libraries, and similar 
calls, which must now go unheeded, although coming in almost 
every day. The only reserve we now have is to supply each new 
State as it wheels into line. It is with extreme regret that we are 
obliged to state ourselves unable to supply a legitimate demand. 
Of course our own State has had the preference. The last copy 
sent was after repeated calls to the State Agricultural College at 
Lincoln, Nebraska, the statement having been added that the person 
wishing the copy was lecturer on State hygiene and sanitary science. 
The establishment of several such professorships at different insti- 
tutions in the country is a very encouraging feature. There is 
need of good, plain, elementary text-books for use in our schools. 
At least some aspects of the question could be presented in a plain, 
practical manner, even if it were impossible to give anything like 
a connected view of the comprehensive whole included under the 



BBPOBT OF Tin: BTATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

term Pul ■ >ne. Thai there must be bo much element 

knowle Lge on bo many branches presupposed is one almost insup- 
• obstacle to anything like a solution <>f this 

problem. Every method and plan that aids in educating the 
. the prevention of disease and prolonging life is certainly 
to bo commended. 

BTATI BOARDS OP HEALTH, 

There have been bo many Inquiries relative to the States that 
have such organizations and the date of their construction, tfa 
have compiled the following table win ih shows the dal 
one. Their ; . ary, and also the fields they cover. For 

. that of Louisiana was first created in 1855, as a Quar- 
ranti i for the State, and in 1870, reconstructed and given 

in addition all the usual powers of State Boards; that of Rho Le 

I, has also tli" contagious diseases of animals to look on 
and prove:;'. Many minor differences exist, bul on the w 
they are planned alike. I have not yet learned the composition 
of the Arkansas Board. 

Ajs Been by the table. Massacl laugurated the movement, 

subject was I afloat in 1850, when a comm 

appointed to make a sanitary survey of the Siate. Their report is 
one of tb - apers on public hygiene, and is valu 

for all time. The reports of the B valuable sanitary 

library in themselves, and are contributions to the literature of 
bat will be of permanent value. The tacts re- 
corded have been - for much work by other hands, r 
i of the ! >nted and enthusi 
. they did much to popularize and extend the knowle 
of sanitary science. Dr. Logan, 
: he California Stat if Health lead, and, 
I think, the l'. - of the Louisiana and Virginia Boards, 
: with Mil; en no changes in 
organized, with possibly 
ption. T rts of the vario ling 
value and in ixtended and 

era! clerl 
■n be undertaken for- 
'■') others ored. The wise gi of the E 

has d in the 

d this lini 



'I 



66 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



publish reports every year, several once in two years. The earlier 
reports of the older Boards bring a high premium and are 
obtained with extreme difficulty. The presentation to our own 
Board of the Massachusetts reports from the first to the ninth in- 
clusive by our President, Dr. Butler, was of great value, as it is 
almost impossible to obtain a complete set now. 

The following is a list of the State Boards of Health, now in 
existence, with the names and address of their secretaries and date 
of organization: 



When organized. 


STATES. 


DATE. 


SECRETARIES. 


Massachusetts, 


1869 


, H. P. Walcott, Boston. 


California, 


1870 


, F. W. Hatch, M.D., Sacramento. 


Louisiana, 


1870 


, S. S. Herrick, M.D., New Orleans. 


Virginia, 


1871 


, S. S. Joynes, M.D., Richmond. 


Dist. of Columbia 


t, 1871 


, Smith Townshend, M.D., Washington. 


Minnesota, 


1872 


, C. N. Hewitt, M.D., Red Wing. 


Michigan, 


1873 


Henry B. Baker, M.D., Lansing. 


Maryland, 


1874 


C. W. Chancellor, M.D., Baltimore. 


Georgia, 


1875 


V, H. Taliaferro, M.D., Atlanta. 


Alabama, 


1875 


T. A. Means, M.D., Montgomery. 


Wisconsin, 


1876 


J. T. Reeve, M.D., Appleton. 


Colorado, 


1876 


F. J. Bancroft, M.D., Denver. 


Illinois, 


1877 


John H. Rauch, M.D., Chicago. 


Mississippi, 


1877 


Wirt Johnson, M.D., Jackson. 


New Jersey, 


1877 


E. M. Hunt, M.D., Metchuen. 


North Carolina, 


1877 


Thomas F. Wood, M.D., Wilmington. 


Tennessee, 


1877 


W. M. Clark, M.D., Nashville. 


Connecticut, 


1878, 


C. W. Chamberlain, M.D., Hartford. 


Kentucky, 


1878, 


N. J. Sawyer, M.D., Frankfort. 


Rhode Island, 


1878 


Charles H. Fisher, M.D., Providence. 


South Carolina, 


1879 


H. D. Fraser, M.D.. Charlestown. 


Delaware, 


1879 


William Marshal, M.D., Milford. 


West Virginia, 


1879 


J. E. Reeves, M.D., Wheeling. 


Iowa, 


1880 


S. F. Andrews, Des Moines. 


New York, 


1880 


Elisha Harris, M.D., New York. 


Arkansas, 


1880 




Indiana, 


1881 


T. M. Stevens, M.D., Indianapolis. 


New Hampshire, 


1881 


J. A. Watson, M.D., Concord. 


Twenty-seven s 


tates n 


ow have State Boards of Health. The 


District of Columbia has 


a similar organization, but is not included 



EtEPORl OP in i: -TATE BOARD OP HEALTH. G7 

in the twenty-seven, Active movementa are being made In other 
hich will in all probability Bwell the list rapidly, New 

York and Massachusetts remunerate most liberally, although other 

shown an increased regard tor the claims of Banitary 

ad Siatc hygeine, and of the practical value to the State, 

Of the results achieved. The Work is extensive enough in any 

to demand the whole time and thought of at least one man, 

still this claim is more slowly responded to; DUl One by one the 

States are recognizing this fact and acting upon it. 

MAI.AKIA. 

The study ol the recent outbreak of malaria in this State can 
led only as preliminary, but before any definite con- 
clusions can be drawn, the facts must he carefully collated and 

rded for future use. The held lias been thoroughly investi- 
gated, a large portion of it personally, but preference in the local 

histories has been given to those that have so kindly and fully 
I the inquiries. The paper of Gen. Viele treats of the 
Bubjed in a more comprehensive manner, and he has furnished a 
valuable contribution to the literature of the subject. The relation 
of W ter County, New York, BS a breeder of malarial germs 

for S - ern New England as shown, is very interesting and 

very valuable, considering that Gen. Viele lias constructed a topo- 
graphical map of that county, and is, therefore, fully acquainted 
with it< char;: i. The drainage map illustrates both papers 

and will be an invaluable aid for all future etudies of the Board of 
local diseases, as influenced by drainage areas. We have fell the 
need of such a map wui'ully in previous investigations, and a I 
felt want is thus supplied. A few extra copies will he provided for 
the use of the Board in future studies, and upon this general 
ground-work, the minor systems affecting smaller areas ca 
built up. 
In only a half dozen instance whole area covered, was 

replying to my circular, and BU 

quent letters of inquiry. Seventy-five in a hundred replied 
promptly, without re] .1 of tin- remain 

third 
and as stated above only 
neglected to ;. In some rmation could not 

is, Borne intelligent citizen could usually 



05 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

give nearly as correct an account, for the types and phases of ma- 
laria are now pretty much as well known by the people as by the 
physicians. The following is the list of questions sent out. 

1. Date of first cases that originated in this town, as nearly as known. 

2. Nature of the first cases, intermittent, typho-malarial, etc. 

3. Locality of first cases in relation to, 
&, altitude, on high or low ground, 

Z>, vicinity of marshes, ponds, or streams, 

c, any other probable cause which please describe. 

4. Have there been cases of 
a, regular intermittent, 
I), tertian ague, 

c, congestive chills, 

d, typho-malarial fever, 

e, enlarged spleen ; 

f, mention other forms. 
Which are most prevalent ? 
"Which have proved fatal ? 

5. Are malarial diseases now increasing, diminishing, or stationary ? 

6. Had there been any unusual disturbance of land, or obstruction 
to natural drainage by dams, or embankments previous to the appear- 
ance of malaria, and likely to cause it ? Describe any conditions which 
were likely to cause malaria. 

7. Is there any local cause that has apparently influenced its location 
or persistence in any special portion of the town? If so please describe. 

8. Nature of flooded lands, if any, and of the streams obstructed, 
whether rapid or sluggish. Average depth of water in ponds; is bed 
or any part exposed or offensive during any part of the day ? How 
long before the appearance of malaria were the dams built ? Have they 
been raised recently ? 

9. Has the presence of malarial diseases influenced the frequency of 
typhoid fever or consumption ? 

10. How extensively have malarial diseases prevailed, and what 
ages are affected ? 

Please answer the above questions as fully as convenient. Any other 
facts concerning the appearance and spread of malarial diseases will be 
gratefully received. It is desirable to secure as full a history of the 
present manifestation as possible even if no light be thrown upon its 
causation. 

The first special investigation that engaged our attention exclusive 
of those relating to small-pox, the salient features of which are 
given in the general report, and hardly need repetition, was in 
reference to the sanitary drainage of New Milford. 



REPORT OF mi: BTATB BOARD OP HEALTH. 69 

The following Letter of invital early in M 

ctioD made, and the report toll 

Mn. i OKD, («>nn.. Ma\ 1 1. I 

Db, C. W. CHAMBBBLAnr, Sabtfobd, Conn.: 

Dmr sir: — The selectmen of this town have called ■ town meeting 
fornexl Saturday p.m., the 14th inst., to consider the subjeel of the 
village sewerage, and to make an appropriation for necessary improve- 
ments and extensions. What exists no* is inadequate and incomplete, 
and we wish to work intelligently and with a view to permanence. To 
this end I have been requested by the authorities to inquire of you what 
tance, if any, we can gain from the State Board of Health. Can a 
representative of your Board come here to examine the situation and 
give us scientific and practical advice I [fso, can he come this week, 
and, after necessary investigation, give any desired information at the 
meeting on Saturday p. n1 This could be accomplished byhisooming 

here Friday p. m., and sta\ instill Saturday P. If. But if not then, bow 
soon after could he come, and confer with a COmmitt) 

I: I member of the Hoard cannot come, please inform me how we can 
i;et the desired information ami assistance. Yours truly, 

T. D WIGHT Mkkwin. 

Iii response t«> this invitation an investigation was made and a 
plan >rage and drainage advised, which was carried on 

illustrated by the map and following report. The drain in Main 
had been laid some time. 



70 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



SANITARY" DRAINAGE OF NEW MILFORD. 

New Milford is a beautiful town situated in the upper valley of 
the Housatonic, amidst very picturesque scenery. It has long en- 
joyed a deserved reputation as very healthful, the principal 
endemic disease being typhoid fever, although that was never very 
prevalent. The usual unsanitary conditions incident to village life 
were found here, although in a less marked degree than in many 
places not as favorably situated. Naturally, as in all villages, and, 
indeed, in many cities, the principal sanitary evil was found in the 
too prevalent habit of storing up domestic filth about the dwell- 
ings by priv}?"- vaults and cess-pools, instead of securing its prompt 
removal, and its utilization by the rootlets of plants, which, after 
all, are nature's great alchemists, and can, and do, transform death 
to life, and the sources of disease and death, to health and life- 
giving sustenance. In early years, before long occupancy had con- 
taminated the soil, so that the w r ater gathered from it was yet un- 
polluted by filth and the germs of disease, the resultants of such 
conditions in malignant-contagious diseases was comparatively 
unknown. The addition of an adequate supply of* pure drinking 
water from a beautiful lake high in the hills, whose water-shed is 
uncultivated forest-land for the most part, while it removed this 
element of danger from those that used the public water supply, 
increased the soil saturation by the large quantities of water intro- 
duced, which had no other outlet than the natural drainage of the 
soil. 

"Whether there was any relation here of cause and effect is, of 
course, not certain, but not long after malarial diseases appeared, 
and, as in many hill towns, in the form of typho-malarial fever, at 
the outset, the first case in 1879. Malarial diseases have prevailed 
here more or less ever since the original type, being the most pre- 
valent form. 

There has been no marked increase in the sickness rate of the 
town, except relatively, as in other towns, during the last two 
years, which have not been as healthy as the average. There has 
been no general prevalence of intermittent fever, or diseases of 
that type; dumb-ague and malarial neuralgias have been met in 
some cases, and the general periodic influence felt by all diseases. 
There has been not a case of congestive chills, and nothing like 
chronic malarial poisoning. The mongrel malarial fever, with a 




* ©RAIMA©© • 

www mi: 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. <1 

.•ion and cod tin u with no 

marked chill been m imon. < »f late all 

forms have been less frequ< 

Ls there were well-known sanitary evils tl ion, 

it waa tfa si plan thai w< 

76 the w p. If the conditions tavorab] 

. be reduced to their minimum, at the same timet 
coul I >n. There were BeveraJ levels, with 

osive table lands above, with no adequate or drain- 

and abrupt precipitous banks between in some p 
others, steep] r again, L WTiere there were sue- 

tr different levels the drain; 
at their maximum. re one or two morasses where 

drainage had been carried to a L swamp hole with no exit 

erflow, but these w< 
Some nine years since several public-spirited citizens had sub- 

>r so. and constructed a large drain 

pry oil the surfao rm water, which flooded the main 

autumn, and generally after heavy 

ag very unpleasant This is BQown on 

the map by a heavy line running through the center of the street. 

hydrants are also 
marked. There is force eno\ the hydrants to throw the 

p through the highest buildings, thus furnishing 

a perfect fire- Jly the public square, 

wider at the lower i. of cour- uare in shape, but it 

nrpose. The houses on the upper side stand on 
higher ground than th< and in front of the offset wall is a 

i lawn, then | . and then again, a level lawn of vary 

width on the other side, of which ; runs parallel with the 

one first named, with another h of lawn before the 

es are reached. There ar. elm for the 

ich, with its more open habit 
for i 'ioes not • all sunlight from 

ground while excluding ikes ■ v< itiful 

i 
and other public buildings,' including n hall, a fine ■. 

of pressed brick, the i 

train 
Lrainage 
•*r, but later the n 



72 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

to enter. But it never becomes offensive; it is well ventilated and 
receiving no sewage proper, is never foul. 

The cess-pool system, with all its evils of soil saturation and 
dangers from sewer gas, from non-ventilation of the cess-pool, es- 
pecially in winter, when the house is warmer, is in vogue here, as 
generally where there is a water supply and no sewers. To a large 
extent this is remedied by the new sewers, but where there are no 
sewers, still remains. Many do not consider the danger of poison- 
ing the air of the house from the gases following back the drain 
pipe, and as the ground is frozen in winter, the top of the cess-pool 
hermetically sealed, and the cess-pool half full of fluid contents with 
the foul gases above, if a pailful more enters by the drain a pailful 
of the gases must escape back into the house, for it cannot go any- 
where else. This is partly true in summer, but not fully, as part 
of the gases escape elsewhere, but in winter there is no other 
avenue than the house. This is a common evil wherever cess- 
pools are used, but the evil is so great that, at the risk of repetition 
of what is said elsewhere, it is stated here. 

It was decided that some general plan should be followed by which 
the greatest good could be accomplished and the most evils reme- 
died. The advice of the State Board of Health was asked, and as 
thorough a survey made by its delegate as circumstances allowed. 
The ground near the river is for a long distance a low, alluvial 
meadow, overflowed at high water. Near Bridge street the land 
is a little higher, but above that the low land reaches nearly to the 
railroad, and a few feet after crossing the railroad there is a steep 
bank nearly the whole length of Railroad street. The hill from 
this street up Bennett, past Terrace street, is steep, and leads di- 
rectly to the high hills which approach the river nearer as you leave 
New Milford, as is indicated by the course of the railroad. Terrace 
street also leads directly to steep hills and long ascents, as do all 
the streets running in that direction. The hills are very steep as 
you leave New Milford in any direction, except along the valley. 
The village lies upon a plateau, with here and there steep pitches 
and abrupt changes from one level to another. There are, as it 
were, a succession of irregular terraces. The meadow level first, 
then a narrow one for Railroad and West streets, and a broad 
plain for Main street, a rise, a narrow divide, then a descent and 
another plain for East street, beyond which the high hills rise 
sharply, and the topography of the town is roughly outlined. To 
be wholly shown, contour lines are necessary, but these I believe, 



RBP0R1 OF TH1 BTATB BOARD OF HEALTH. 7-'. 

have never I rveyed. The grouping of the drains 

the Blopee and Levels. [1 iaed that the i 

as the outlet whenever practicable, and thai the size of the 
•• be adapted to the work f of it. A- there was no 

ding for storm water 
it wa i further, thai drainage was 

tired, the Bewer be only Large enough to carry th< 
gion, and to receive in addition enough storm water to 
flush it thoroughly. The drains where no - e Deeded, il- 

lustrate the double design of Bewerage and drainage. The i 
unsanitary conditions in the town were formerly to be found at 

road street, where open surface drains ran sluggishly a] 

and found an outlet into a Bluggish ditch with little or no fall, 

h extended through the meadow to the river. Similar drains 

ran down from the plain above, and a succession of evils was pro. 

mptied into the open hold. An outlet is now 

I for all. As l.ei' dying the map it must 

at while principal object t 

acco: . the drainage of certain portions is so no less. By 

- all points can be reached. By the work 

already done : removed, and the town put in 

a better condition than the aver, ecting drainage and sewer- 

With a pure wa' ly and adequate means for the re- 

] of waste and filth, other .'-crease as well as 

malarial. Outside of the village and the meadows near the river, 

the town is hilly. One high hill alter another, with here and 

and or p inns lying among 

ajns of ample prosperity. The e 
of the hills is beautiful. es of 

inding through Low-lying mead' and 

village nestling amongst the h . Milford 

tory. < )f 
I learn that some new manufacturing enterpr 

I iria in the early history "f tho 
. taken i;. fcion with the : 

' 

lmpurit:- 



74 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

nidus for the development of the germ or particulate of malarial dis- 
eases. The future history of these two towns, Fairfield and New 
Milford, especially with reference to the prevalence of malarial 
diseases within their borders, will be watched with peculiar in- 
terest, as they have quite extensive drainage for the ground water. 
The map, with a general idea of the topography of the town, 
shows how complete the arrangements are. In many of the 
houses, as learned while there, the house drain pipes are ventilated 
as well as trapped. There is no movement more worthy of en- 
couragement than that to remove at once from one's immediate 
surroundings, the filth that, stored up in the subsoil, or in deeper 
pits, pollutes earth, air, and water. Moreover, the germs of dis- 
ease retain their vitality thus stored for years, and if kept in the 
soil near at hand, may at any time again poison some human 
system. As the seeds of unfamiliar plants are retained for long 
years in the deep soil, and when from any cause the lower layers 
of soil are thrown upon the surface and exposed to air and sun- 
light, spring up and grow and produce plants after their kind, so 
the seeds of disease may lay long buried, and when again intro- 
duced into some human system, reproduce the disease. There is 
then scarcely any greater menace to health than the storage of 
excremental filth near the dwellings of man. Deep pits upon 
which vaults once stood have been uncovered ten or fifteen years 
or more after disuse and covering with earth, and the character- 
istic foecal odor still found. The rapid removal of filth, then, is 
one of the most important sanitary measures, far-reaching in its 
benefits. 

During the past year there has been but little sickness within 
the town limits, and the year as a whole has been one of unusual 
healthfulness, especially during the autumn and winter. 







PA R T OF > 

POQUONUC RIVER 

^Nr.MfV.eVw.**. Ct 



REPORT OF Tin: STATE BOARD OP IIKAl.TII 



THE SCARLET FEVER EPIDEMIC AT POQUONNOC 

BRIDGE 

d in the town of Groton, aboul four miles 

itoD and about five from Mystic River. In the same town 

een each village and Po [uonnoc there are high hills; the lat- 

lie8 in a valley between. The map gives a very . 
of the topography of the village. Outside its limits there are 
I farm houses that were occasionally invaded. There are 
three and four hundred inhabitants as nearly as I can es- 
timal I from Groton follows the Shore Line Railroad 

it reaches the station, when it turn- and follows the river. 
e are about a dozen houses before the village is reached. The 
r is rather shallow and narrow near the village, where it re- 
water stream, the outlet of a pond which in its turn 
1 by a stream thai hills that inclose this val- 

To wards the west are the Groton hills and towards the east 
are also high hills. These are perhaps not due east or west, but 
in tl. d direction. On the west side the land lies on nearly 

a dead level for half a mile or more; on the cast the land is rolling 
and somewhat rough until the hills are reached. The villag 
in a valley or basin which the river drains, and it receives also the 
..age from quite a large watersh >d. The tide sets up the river 
to it- id in very high tides flows into the swampy mi 

: of the church. There are three of these swampy marsl 

I know this is the only one into which the tide flows, 
but that is i int in its action, that is only al very high 

< toe would think these would be the most favorable 
litions pos r the production of malaria, but there has 

developer aditions hereafter de- 

an to I).- m »8l favorable for tin' production of ma- 
The head water of the river 
;. at high tide, but rtlow at low tide 

rent points along Btream are shown on tie- map 
river. The railroad embankment 

• •iii- 
:it. This 

I, upon which rip rap 



76 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

and below. Below the bridge is a bar, bare at low tide, leaving 
a narrow channel, and at the outlet of the river there is one also, 
I am told, but this I did not verify. 

This bar at the mouth is said to be largely overgrown with eel 
grass, which has a tendency to obstruct the free flow of the water 
in and out over the bar. Old inhabitants state that since the 
growth of this grass and the construction of the railroad embank- 
ment, and the development of the bar shown in the map, the 
waters of the river, especially above the bridge, before limpid and 
clear, and stocked with fish and various forms of Crustacea, has 
become turbid, filled with large floating masses of aquatic vegeta- 
tion, and innumerable organisms, like jelly fishes, the lowest types 
of plant life are abundant, and that the food-producing fishes, 
and the like above mentioned, are no longer found that formerly 
were plenty. However that may be, the water was found to be 
generally dark and turbid, more so in the shallower parts nearer 
shore, where there were masses of aquatic vegetation of the 
lower types that are extremely simple in their organization. The 
waters, moreover, seemed to be teeming with the lower forms of 
animal life that are visible to the eye, but it was not examined 
microscopically. Below the bridge the river broadens; its general 
contour is well shown in the map prepared by W. H. Richards, 
C. E., of New London, under whose direction the cases were 
located. About the middle of May there were several cases of 
what was called diphtheria, preliminary to the scarlet fever. 

The earlier cases were many of them very mild, but as near as 
I could learn the first well marked case was on the 1 4th day of 
May. Tn all, until August 15th, there were eight or ten cases of 
diphtheria, and three deaths. The diphtheria cases almost, if not 
quite, invariably preceded the scarlet fever, although as many 
that had the latter disease had what were called diphtheretic 
throats, their friends often stated that they had both these dis- 
eases; hence a confusion arose. The eight or ten cases, however, 
above mentioned, were those where diphtheria was the primary 
disease. Soon after the diphtheria, scarlet fever appeared, and in 
a short time became epidemic; at the date mentioned there had' 
been forty cases of scarlet fever and five deaths, this makes fifty 
cases in all, and eight deaths. The statistics I obtained from Dr. 
F. A. Coates, who, from intimate personal knowledge, could give, 
the facts accurately as his experience in .this epidemic was exten- 
sive. I am also indebted to him for a clear and exhaustive de- 



REPORT OF tin: STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, 

■ of the c I the mai as of the 

fever, from first to last, in all forma and type 
the ; .il forms. It was endeavored at H: 

ant for the spread of the d n, but found that 

:>t in a few instances, there was no relation that could !»<• 
lished between bi s, there ? • r any in- 

ktion period between the supp , and the onset of 

the disease. 
Tlii" school which had a daily a\ tendance of about forty, 

closed tin- fourth week in June. The teacher stated • 
there was no attendance by other children >>( a family if one 

were sick; in SUCl the well children were in all cases with- 

drawn. In proof of this si. i by the register, that the aver- 

attendant ecreased from between thirty ami forty to 

cli day. 
Besides this, the fact that scattered cases occurred simultaneously 
1 family widely separated, where there was no 

nihility of intei ier the parents nor children coming 

ther for any purpose, in the on< U the traffic beine; with 

. in the oilier, with Groton. militated against 

Nor in the same family were the cases suc- 
ritb a period of incubation intervening after the second 
took the infection from tin 1 first, but several in one family v 

1 simultaneously, or nearly s<>. Then there 
number of cases that came down at once within a few hours of each 
other. Nearly a third of thi attacked with: 

space of time. A Bed by Dr. Coates, the: 1 to be a 

iral miasmatic influence, a; and the I 

on was not sustained by the facts in I 
■eme constitutional pr tic of 

mild cases, the numerous sequels, and the rapidly fatal ter- 
.alescence was apparently com] ablished, 

suing within forty-eight hours, when just before O 

I .early well, w 
frequent more for the purpose of 

ent of any complications than from 
- seemed r;t ,: ..'!- from 
a complete r* corn- 

man- 
:. but in I 

and nervous Bystem wen appa 



78 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

the action of the poison upon the nervous centers. In other in- 
stances, the disease from the onset, marched rapidly on to death 
without any hindrance. There were a few cases after the date 
mentioned, and some fatal, but there was no general prevalence. 
In the region to the northward there were many malignant cases 
scattered here and there, apparently sporadic. There are many 
that claim such cases originate directly from filth, as every chance 
for contagion seems excluded. 

By a vote of the town Board of Health of Groton, the State 
Board of Health was invited to investigate the causes of the epi- 
demic of scarlet fever, and report to them any action that might 
be deemed expedient to protect the lives and health of the people. 
In response to this request, a careful investigation was made, a 
part of the results of which have already been given. In the first 
place, a visit was paid to quite a number of the houses where 
scarlet fever had prevailed and their surroundings examined, and 
some interiors also visited. The usual sanitary evils incident to 
such places were found, but to a less extent than in larger villages, 
because the territory was sparsely settled. These are the storage 
of filth in vaults, and especially in unventilated cesspools which 
are tightly covered with an untrapped pipe from the sink. The 
wells, for the most part,' were at safe distances from the sources of 
contamination. In some instance, more than the usual care had 
been paid to the surroundings of the house. The local conditions 
about the houses would not explain the epidemic. During the 
investigation, an interesting instance of the communication of the 
contagion of scarlet fever was learned incidentally. There had 
been a family of three sisters residing in the village with their 
parents. One of them married, went to a western city to live, 
and a little more than a year before had died of scarlet fever. 
Her clothing was packed and sent to Poquonnoc, and, after alter- 
ation, worn by the two sisters, who were still at home. They 
were both attacked with scarlet fevef; but as there were no chil- 
dren near and only old persons in the family besides themselves, 
no other cases arose from these during that year. That was in 
1880. The question arose whether, in some manner, the germs or 
particulate of scarlet fever had not spread from here; but no evi- 
dence was found to trace the origin hence. Of course the 
contagion might remain if any of the clothing had been worn or 
handled by others before it had been thoroughly disinfected by 
air and sunlight, if not directly, by artificial means; but after the 



POET OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 7 .' 

! BUCh ' 

- their importanc learned. 

Although it was not absolutely certain, still it v 

ever was introduced by a child from a city where 
.vr had l 1 ensively. 

By the almost universal testimony ol nearly ail the inh 

iveral unprejudice 1 o thai had been - 

sod thai there wa 
smell proceeding from the river, noticeable ■ at low I 

in hot, muggy days, early in the morning, if near the river, and in 
rening. To any one on the river in a boat at certain times 
the odor peculiarly offensive. In certain di 

- of the wind, it was stated thai the odor was pera 
a distance from noticeable but to 

ing tlif pr< 
then n along the river an unusual prevalence of typhoid 

in unusu- 
ally dry an 1 I Low. Tl ed to be a 
of o1 - on Btirring up the bottom of r, and in 

I that these would at times arise quite 
y without any such disturbance. The cause of this odor 
found to be the decay of brush, mainly white birch brush thai 

in the river for 03 ipon. The success of the 

. who to [ity to twenty-five 

• bush,* I uiulated the culti- 

r cartload had kx 1 in 

of birch brush, but of every kind of brush that 

couI<: trimming ish from 

upon 

imped, t" setl Ited, and thrown in in 

all mam.' until it 7 full 

that part dir 

.1 down 
apart, to 

which 1 . 
• ritly. tl. from t! • 

esults of • .- of brush tl 

them. 

••ility 



80 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

the animal and vegetable decay were combined in the summer of 
1881. For there is little oxidization going on in winter and in cold 
weather of late fall. The advocates of the purification of rivers 
polluted by sewage have forgotten or intentionally slurred over that 
fact. They claim that a river that has received sewage becomes 
fit to be used as a source of water supply for cities or towns, but 
do not explain what becomes of the filth in cold weather and in 
winter, when no oxidization takes place. So here, although the 
oysters died during the preceding summer, it was probably late, 
and so the putrefaction was completed the next return of warm 
weather. However that may be, the compounds formed by the 
decay of the large masses of brush-wood that were in the river 
were enough to account for the odors, even if they were the only 
compounds formed. 

This subject was thoroughly investigated. A boat was taken at 
low tide and the river was explored to the bridge and some way 
below. It was seen how a comparatively favorable report could be 
made if brush were taken up (and the men knew where to go for 
all kinds) that had been in the water but a short time. The odors 
were slight and there was no great disengagement of gases; but, 
if a deeper layer was disturbed and those taken up that had been 
in two seasons or nearly as long, or even longer, as we had exam- 
ples of each, there was a disengagement of immense bubbles of 
gas of a sickening odor, and the bush would be encrusted with 
filth, and floating impurities were often entangled in the branches. 
In case of birch brush, the inside wood was a pulpy mass, while 
the tough, tenacious bark held it firmly together, although not 
preserving shape nor outline. The slimy, black mud that coated 
the oldest brush, that is, that deepest in the water, and presumably 
the longest time submerged, was also very offensive. At low 
tide the stakes and some of the brush were partly out of water. 
The odors were to a large extent retained in the valley by the 
conformation of the surrounding hills. The odors would arise and 
be carried along by the winds, and the point of subsidence vrould 
be about where we found the inhabited portions to be. They would 
also reach the hill slopes much more readily than those living 
directly near the river, as in the case of malaria. At the com- 
mencement of the investigation the prejudice was most strongly 
against the brush, but after a careful study of causes it was de- 
cided, after discussion by the Board, that here was a decidedly 
unsanitary condition. If human testimony is worth anything, the 



REPORT OF Tin: BTATB BOARD OF HSALTH. M 

lucta of d< 
og in brackish water. The compounds 
d specially studied in a Long-continu 
i ii now in ■ Prof. Brewer al [field 

>oL There v. condition to a consid- 

nt affecting all. ral laws of diffusion tl 

gases were scattered over the valley to the i hillsides. If 

filth does uot directly produce d ttled bej 

- render it of a more severe and malignant 
and fura favorable to an epidemic. 

While w thought that Bcarlet fever was caused directly by 

the p dilution of the air resulting from the decay of the bi 

fcly increased its malignancy and severity, and furnu 
ble. to an tic. The following report 

made to the Groton Board of Health : 

. 

ur: 

There is no doubt in our minds but that the presence of BUch 
ntities of brush in the river has resulted in conditions 
'mental to the health of the village, and has b< • y un- 

n the case. The brush has caused these condi- 
- in two ways — first, polluting the air by the putrescent cxha- 
latioi i ise from the decay of wood in salt or brackish wi 

secon'i. by im»rference with the free circulation of the tidal 
'■werof the Sheffield Scientific School, a member 
of this Board, who has l>r many yean been studying experiment- 
ally ' <>f our native woods in salt or :hus 
writes in relation to this case: "Th a that I have been 
making t ears in this mat* that any of our 
woo'. I in salt or 1 r produc abundant 
and offensive odors, not only of sulphuretted hydrogen (the 
but also of other exceedingly pd 

1. so far 
as .the senses c laltnessoi 

[ in that which is diluted with three or ; bulk 

- not cease for a long time, 
in the case of brush would pr rf a DUID 

case, of course, but in 
. 
11 



80 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

the animal and vegetable decay were combined in the summer of 
1881. For there is little oxidization going on in winter and in cold 
weather of late fall. The advocates of the purification of rivers 
polluted by sewage have forgotten or intentionally slurred over that 
fact. They claim that a river that has received sewage becomes 
fit to be used as a source of water supply for cities or towns, but 
do not explain what becomes of the filth in cold weather and in 
winter, when no oxidization takes place. So here, although the 
oysters died during the preceding summer, it was probably late, 
and so the putrefaction was completed the next return of warm 
weather. However that may' be, the compounds formed by the 
decay of the large masses of brush-wood that were in the river 
were enough to account for the odors, even if they were the only 
compounds formed. 

This subject was thoroughly investigated. A boat was taken at 
low tide and the river w T as explored to the bridge and some way 
below. It was seen how a comparatively favorable report could be 
made if brush were taken up (and the men knew where to go for 
all kinds) that had been in the water but a short time. The odors 
were slight and there was no great disengagement of gases; but, 
if a deeper layer was disturbed and those taken up that had been 
in two seasons or nearly as long, or even longer, as we had exam- 
ples of each, there was a disengagement of immense bubbles of 
gas of a sickening odor, and the bush would be encrusted with 
filth, and floating impurities were often entangled in the branches. 
In case of birch brush, the inside wood was a pulpy mass, while 
the tough, tenacious bark held it firmly together, although not 
preserving shape nor outline. The slimy, black mud that coated 
the oldest brush, that is, that deepest in the water, and presumably 
the longest time submerged, was also very offensive. At low 
tide the stakes and some of the brush were partly out of water. 
The odors were to a large extent retained in the valley by the 
conformation of the surrounding hills. The odors would arise and 
be carried along by the winds, and the point of subsidence would 
be about where we found the inhabited portions to be. They would 
also reach the hill slopes much more readily than those living 
directly near the river, as in the case of malaria. At the com- 
mencement of the investigation the prejudice was most strongly 
against the brush, but after a careful study of causes it was de- 
cided, after discussion by the Board, that here was a decidedly 
unsanitary condition. If human testimony is worth anything, the 



REPORT OP Tin: BTATI BOARD OF HEALTH. 

air WIS pollut 

from ish-wood rotting in 

'! gpeciall] 

eo now in Prof. Brewer a1 field 

■..I. There n meral condition to a consid- 

nt affecting all. I ral laws of diffusion tl 

gase- Vi-v the valley to I hillsides. If 

filth docs not produce d ae ihin^ La settled bej 

- render it of a more severe and malignant 
. and furnishes tfa arable to an 8] 

Whi] thought t! v by 

the p tllution of tl suiting from the decay of the brush, 

£ly increased its malignancy and si md f urn: 

vorable. to an epidemic. The following r« 
made to the Groton Board of Health : 

f HeaUh of the Tovn of 

-■ :i.kmi:.v: 
There is no doubt in our minds but that the presence of Bach 
quantities of brush in the river lias resulted in conditions 
'mental to the health of the village, and has been a very un- 
sanitary element in the case. The brush has caused these condi- 
tions int. —first, polluting the air by the putrescent exha- 
lations that arise from the decay of wood in salt or brackish wi 
second, by interference with the free circulation of the tidal 

he Sheffield Scientific School, a 
of this Board, who has for mai studying 

ally y of our native woods in salt or brackish water, thus 

writes in relation I Be: " Tl -that I have : 

making t in this mat' that any of our 

woo'. I in salt or b r produce very abundant 

and offensive odors, not only of sulphuretted hydrogen (the 
but also of other - 
E for a lo: far 

be senses c 
water, or in that which is diluted with three or :'■ bulk 

water. 
m the case of brush would probably last a nun. 
The dead oyster- t in 

11 



I 



82 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

a very unsanitary element, both, from their own decay, and from 
their interference with the free circulation of the tidal waters." 

By obstructing the free circulation of the tidal waters filth is re- 
tained in the river that would otherwise be swept out to sea; thus 
the products of the decay of the brush were doubtless augmented 
by those resulting from the putrefaction of the oysters that set 
upon the brush but died during the preceding year. 

By such pollution of the air conditions favorable to the produc- 
tion of an epidemic are caused, also favorable to the malignancy 
as well as to the spread of disease. Prevalent winds sweep these 
exhalations from the river over the village and to the distant hill- 
sides. As the village lies largely in a valley, they arise, diffuse 
themselves through the atmosphere, until the barrier of the hills 
is reached, which to a great extent confine them within the limits 
of the valley. The removal of the brush from the river is there- 
fore recommended, especially from that portion above the railroad 
crossing. 

While we believe that in accordance with the general laws of 
the disease, so far as known, scarlet fever was introduced from the 
contagion of some preceding case, and results from a specific 
poison, we also believe that such specific poison is vastly intensified 
by pollution of the air by the products of decay as described, 
and that the epidemic was rendered possible by this contamination 
of the air which intensified the specific poison of the scarlet fever, 
increased its malignancy, and furnished the essential conditions for 
its general diffusion, for it is well known that in epidemics the 
specific poison of the disease, whatever it may be, acts through a 
much greater space than at other times. 
By order of the Board, 

C. W. CHAMBERLAIN, M.D., 
Secretary of the Conn, State Board of Health. 

This report was received favorably by the Board of Health of 
Groton. They had intended to have the brush removed at once 
and taken by a large scow out to deep water and dumped; but 
they were at once threatened with an injunction and suit by the 
deep-sea fishermen if they dumped a single load in the deep 
water. The following extract from a letter from the chairman of 
the Board of Health of Groton explains the difficulties encoun- 
tered. As will be seen, the decision of the State Board of Health 
was that the decaying brush caused an unsanitary condition; 



BEPOBI OF tin: BTATB BOABD OF iikalth. 

■■■. in other words, nnhealthful, detrimental to health and Life, 
and likely :<• increase the * ght be in- 

troduced. 

A similar condition, from other causes, was Btated to exist in 
another town, where as yet there had been no sickness; indeed, 
once or twice in the Bame town nearly the Bame conditions had 

Sted, and no sickness arose. It was stated that all they needed 

was the germ ot Borne Eymotic disease to be introduced to hai 

epidemic. Shortly afterwards, the predictions were verified, for, 

from a single case of the disease, diphtheria spread like wild (ire, 
and in less than three weeks there were a hundred cases or more. 
In another instance, where similar causes existed, the same was 
•.red true. In less than two weeks there were fifteen to 
two: ;" a Bevere type of zymotic disease, and seventy-live to 

eighty of a milder type. There is nothing more plainly demon- 
1 than that filth increases the severity of disease and favors 
epidemics. These three instances all occurred within the ; 

re are, it must be remembered, three elements: the filth the 
nidus or nest for the disease, the germs or particulate of dia 
and third, a human system ready to receive it; either may be 
wanting. 

To return to the letter. The chairman states: 

We find ourselves embarrassed in the execution of our decree declar- 
ing the brush a nuisance and ordering its removal not less than one mile 
from the shore iu Long Island sound. We are met with this state of 
thing 

1. The doctors do not think it advisable to remove or expose so large 
ft quantity of decayed wood at present. 

•J. We have no place to put it. If it is cast into the sea. the fisher- 
men cry out against it, and threaten the proprietors of oyster bids that 
they will prosecute every man that dumps a single load; and the pro- 
prietors aforesaid are seriously atraid to act. 

. they prefer to incur the penalty of disobedience to our 

order. 

Y<m will recollect yo. 1 the possibility of harm and opposi- 

tion in dumping it overboard; hut I thought there would he no ... 
tion to that method of disposing of it. 

iiid putrid smell on any Bhore in the valley 
WOUl lit with g than at present they are BZ] 

t". w e fear thi 

5. Why not hury it I 

not room enough on the shore, and to hury 



84 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

sixty or a hundred acres of brush — I do not know the exact area of 
brush — would be seemingly impossible. We have passed the decree to 
remove it to the middle of the sea. 

What can or shall we do? We should be glad to be and do right in 
this emergency. 

We called on you to examine and decide, and we agreed to abide by 
and carry out your decision. But I thought we might all of us deliber- 
ately review the case, for you recollect you were strenuous for one thing, 
and that is, that this unsanitary condition of the river was a means of 
aggravating any epidemic, while you refrain from asserting that the 
scarlet fever wa9 caused by the brush in the water. I ask your attention 
to the new and practical aspect of the case. * * * 

The opinion was returned involved in the first report, but made 
more explicit that the brush should not be disturbed until cold 
weather, oxidation and decay would have ceased, and there would 
be little danger in its removal. We coincided in the opinion of 
the physicians of the neighborhood, that it would be dangerous to 
stir up so much putrescent and putrescible material. It was ad- 
vised that, should the removal be rendered necessary from any 
reason, that small portions be taken at a time and burned, by- 
throwing them upon an intensely hot flame in a temporary kiln, so 
constructed that the' smoke should be drawn over an intensely -hot 
coal fire before escaping into the open air. It was, however, de- 
cided to wait until cold weather. During a cold time late in the 
fall, quite a quantity was removed. It w T as amusing to hear 
the objection raised that, because the brush was not then offensive, 
it never could have been the means of doing any harm. The very 
fact that the cold weather, when oxidation was at a minimum, had 
been waited for, was lost sight of; and because, according to rule, 
putrescent decay was not then actively going on, was proof suffi- 
cient that it never had been, and that the brush had never been 
offensive. Of a similar nature w r as the published statement that 
those living near a heap of the removed brush did not find it of- 
fensive, and made no objection to it. Of course, it was not then 
particularly objectionable, as the time had bean taken for its re- 
moval when decomposition was going on at the slowest rate, if at 
all; hence, little or no bad odor. 

The following regulations of the Groton Board of Health are 
published, not as a model in all respects, but as possessing many 
practical common-sense qualities, and judicious, on the whole, in 
their recommendations: 



; Mi: BO \i:n OP HEALTH. 



BGULATIOfl HE BOARDOP BEA1 

THE TOWN OF GROT 1N M 

ADOPTED AUGUST 13, 1881. 

1. Thai in al 
Dip] 

q] and i • 
all ot >ns be positively e 

durh. ace of the 

2. a house is b 

- in a house so infected, that the chil 
and living in Baid house shall be kept av 

resort; nor shall any person b< 
to or fn -use be allowed to vi 

;ntil such infected house has b( 

such person cleansed of the 
ise. 

3. Tl. any person dies of such epidemic disease, 
the body shall be decently buried without delay, and privately. 

A : i »f these rules is required, under the penalties of 

the law in sue: 

And we recommend that all cesspools, vaults, and possible nui- 
sances be looked to and cleansed, and all filth removed and Dm 
and i " that any Bttch trouble near to any well of 

Highly examined. These things should be done at < 
without - ak out. But when contagious 

disease does break out. let no panic or noisy proc 

of danger, for ti 1; but let the local c 

munity quietly organize benevolent and efficient committ. - 

causes of deadly disease are removed, and that 
bolic or quick-lime, or other disinfi 
applied; others see that all bi 

; a notice posted on the d( 
and others still that the wants of sick fam: 
so that there shall be no occasion to 

t and act i it will 

Ith of our afflicted fellow c il as 

expense to the to I ard of Health, when called o 

.are ready to i ■ i. bo far as in their power I 

Gfio Bo H. 

• rthy of record, as it is only 

• rning their laws, which an and well 

enough, if we only k: 
S 



Ob REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

particulate which produces it may not be originated de novo from 
filth directly no one can assert positively. Indeed, our knowledge 
of the cell, the lowest organized element that we know certainly 
about, has been wonderfully simplified of late, while formerly we 
considered that agent that builds up every tissue of the body as 
composed of a cell wall enclosing protoplasm, and a nucleus, with 
perhaps a nucleolus within; first, our confidence in the cell wall 
was shaken, and we found it only a constituent of age caused by 
a hardening of the outer walls; then a nucleus was found not 
essential, and a formative particle of protoplasm is all that is left ; 
the rest may or may not be. So, as we delve deeper in this micro- 
scopical world, whose relative importance to our own lives we 
have but dimly discovered, we may unearth some truths concern- 
ing these little entities that cause disease that may settle many, 
of these vexed questions of origin. 




REPORT OF TH1 BTATK BOARD OF BEALTH. -7 



HEALTH RESORTS. 

Prom time to time, one and another of the places tl. 
under tl have cursorily been brought t<» our notice, and 

vol some slight attention. But, from what I Incident- 

rned, the advisability of making a grand and Bysten 
survey of these places has seemed imperative; and, upon pree 
t ion of the topic to the Board, it was determined that systematic 

work Bhould DC done as thoroughly as possible, and in Bome : 

lar order, taking advantage, of course, of any chance visits in the 
neighborhood. It is not to be inferred that there has been any- 

tiling in general learned concerning unsanitary conditions 
prevail at health resorts in this State, but from the importance of 
the Bubject and from what has resulted from similar work else- 
where. The importance of considering what provisi< ns are pre- 
sented for escape from the buildings in case of fire, in accordance 
with the suggestions of the Illinois State Board, caused that to be 
added to the points to be investigated. The greatest sanitary 
usually found where a large, but heretofore little-used, 
old country tavern suddenly becomes popular as a summer resort. 

primitive regulations still survive, and. as a result, sic! 
breaks out. But, as shown by the careful investigations of a i 
ton doctor, the more common result is that the seeds of typhoid 

I kindred 3 are implanted in the system duri] 

sum • in such a pleasant, sequestered spot, to be devel- 

: in the autumn Boon after the return home. When the real 
!' the trip become apparent, people that are extremely 

careful about tary sum - of their own homes and 

that of their, neighbors, will, without a thought of the 

•ability of ation to tl t, take their fam- 

into a house where there are cesspools within a step of the 
ba<k door, and as near to the windows of the Bleeping-] 

children as CUTC v - ill allow, whore tic well is 

aid cesspool and the privy vault, flanked by the 
pen for convenience. The rapid accumulation of wast.- and filth 
soon think <>f tak- 

. large. I 

shore an : iliar 

liabilities. A rod not fully 



88 REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

completed houses. The sanitary surroundings, except so far as 
absolutely necessary, are usually neglected until the last thing. 
An illustration of this general nature occurred ' at one of the 
resorts near the shore this year. After nearly every one had had 
bowel trouble that was stopping at the house, and some symptoms 
of continued fever, resulting in typhoid fever in two or three 
cases that developed after removal, directly into typhoid fever. 
An investigation showed the following sanitary evils, some of 
which were, in a sort of general way, known, but not supposed to 
have any relation to the sickness »in question until attention was 
called directly to them. The first was a large garbage heap, oys- 
ter shells, lobster shells, leaves of vegetables, pods of peas and 
beans — in a word, kitchen refuse. Upon this was poured a por- 
tion of the slops, and, in general, it was a catch-all for garbage; 
so that, from bones and the like, enough animal matter was added 
to contribute a full quota of the peculiarly detestable odor of 
putrefaction. Doors and windows on that side of the house, when 
to the windward of this heap, were at once closed. This was soon 
remedied by thorough removal and a disinfection of the soil. The 
main drain from the house, through the barn, down to the sea, 
became choked up. When this was dug out to find the obstruc- 
tion, it was found that the drain passed the well very closely, and 
that right here there was a break, and had been for some time, so 
that a regular channel had been worn from the drain to the well 
and the water polluted. A general sudden outbreak of enteric 
fever or of bowel diseases generally, is usually due to polluted 
water. Diphtheria is apparently more readily transmitted by the air. 
When the use of the well-water was discontinued, the bowel trou- 
ble ceased directly. A little care in the first place would have 
averted all this trouble. There have been but few instances in 
this State of extensive sickness at health resorts, and they are, for 
the most part, carefully managed. Still, those that have such 
places in charge should especially know, and act in accordance 
with their knowledge of sanitary laws. It should ever be in their 
minds that neglected filth in the immediate surroundings is more 
potent for evil than the bright, clear, invigorating air from the 
sea or mountain is for good, and that health cannot be secured 
while continually drinking polluted water, even in the most care- 
fully selected surroundings. An important field is here offered 
for study, the results of which are intimately related to the pro- 
tection of the health of the people. 



REPORT OF ill BOARD OF SBALTH. 

PYOGENIC tm.1 KONIA. 

This more properly stands for a form resulting from in: 
t hut results from changes within the body, but, in want of a better 
name, may be used for that variety resulting from filth, and 
dally polluted air. It has Long been recognized that breath- 
ing contaminated air predisposes to catarrhal and other lung trou- 
bles, by inducing a constant congestion of the lung tissues by its 
irritating qualities, sets up a chronic low grade of inflammation, 
and even induces pneumonia Polluted water Less directly pro. 
duces similar trouble, but mainly by depressing the system gem-r- 
ally, so that a cold is followed by severe inflammation. The fol- 
lowing cases illustrate the latter variety. 

In a family, both husband and wife were attacked with pneu- 
monia, the one two days after the other. Both had the character- 
signs of pneumonia; but the wife had two severe chills the 
first day. and chills or increased fever every other day, until 
n days after the attack, when she died. There had also been 
real deal of sickness in the family during the winter and 
spring. The husband, however, recovered. They had used cis- 
tern water, but latterly had depended on a neighboring well for 
drinking water. The sink drain passed underground within two 
of the cistern, and had become stopped up. which was the 
cause of their ceasing to use the water of the cistern for drinking, 
using it for all other purposes. On examining the cistern, the top 
was found covered with a soapy scum, almost like soapsuds, 
proving B clear connection of the drain and cistern. I nfor- 
tunately. they had not learned that the assurances of our health 
in the corrections of our dwellings, our sink-drains, and our 
but it might have been better for them if they had. In 
bher instance, where there was a series of cases in a school, on 
tion it was found that a la:. ol, which received all 

filth from the water-closets, ami the laundry water as well. 
practically ventilated into the Bleeping-room of the victims, 
ol was tightly covered on top, the ground frozen, 
and an open pipe leading directly from the bed-room wash-bai 

be of hot water from the laundry v. 
gases of ispool wei gh this p 

thed by the children. Of course, at all tin. 
wirr md their way here. Ti. 

and many more sick. 
L2 



90 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

CESSPOOL VENTILATION. 

The following is one out of many illustrations of carelessness 
in this regard: 

A gentleman who had lost several children from diphtheria 
wished his house inspected. Everything about the house seemed 
well managed, as it was the abode of wealth, imtil the disposal of 
the filth began to be investigated. As there was a good water 
supply and no sewer, of course we found a cesspool of large size, 
covered closely on top, and unventilated. Upon entering the cel- 
lar, a large opening near the furnace was noticed. Upon inquiry, 
it was found to be a drain for water which sometimes entered the 
cellar, leading directly to the cesspool, untrapped. Every time 
anything passed into the cesspool an equal bulk of foul air or gases 
was forced back into the house, and more readily into the cellar. 
The furnace had no cold-air box, but, as is too often the case, took 
the air from the cellar directly. If the owner had contrived an 
apparatus to send all over his house the foul air and gases generated 
in the cesspool, he could not have succeeded better. Perhaps he be- 
lieved that his cesspool had no relation to the health of his family. 
Death taught him a different lesson, and in the future the teach- 
ings of sanitary science will not be neglected. A forcible illustra- 
tion of the ease with which gases will pass long distances through 
the earth was afforded by the bursting of a gas main in one of 
the streets of New Haven some years ago. It was noticed that 
the inmates of several adjacent houses did not come out as usual 
one morning, nor was there any stir about the houses. The neigh- 
bors broke in and found the inmates lying insensible in their beds, 
with a powerful smell of gas in the rooms. As gas was not used in any 
of the houses, nor were there any connections for it in any of them, 
it was difficult to tell where the gas came from. At length, it was 
found that a gas-main had burst in the street, some sixty feet 
away, and the gas had diffused itself through the ground and 
entered the houses by their cellars, and thus poisoned the inmates. 
Fortunately, they were found in time to save life, but many were 
a long time sick. In a similar manner, but, of course, in a less 
amount, the cellar, especially in winter, when it is warmer, draws 
in all the impurities that may be in the ground air, and thus it is 
an unfit source to take the air to supply a furnace. 



REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

SI \l (ill i Kl.'-ll"! 91 

It is a question of increasing interesl whether something of the 
natuj should not be required by law in this Si 

re now so many appliances for rendering the work here 
1 harmless to health, and indeed comparatively inoffen- 
that the only excuse for not employing them is their expense. 
- is the main reason for compelling the union of all Buch 
ilishments in a city into one. bo that, for their combined use, 
use to each would be small. All the offal can be ven- 
dry, inodorous powder of two grades, each of which 
brings a good price aa a fertilizer, ami the processes are com- 
pletely inodorous; one standing closely to the apparatus v. 
perceive no odor. There are certain regulations that would ren- 
der such establishments less objectionable if they must i 

rately. All blood and fluid, or semi-fluid substances, should 
be received and kept in galvanized iron receptacles and not upon 
the floor. All offal should be similarly placed and at once re- 
moved from the premises. The hides, if they must be kept, can 
be deodorized partially by brushing over the fleshy side some anti- 
cs. The floors and walls should be washed thoroughly and 
gone over once with the sulphate of zinc and salt solution. 

THE RESULTS OF SANITARY SCIENCE. 

It was stated last year in this connection that the sanitary 
engineer was abroad and health boards actively at work. An 
illustration has already been given of what can and has been 
accomplished by the results achieved by the New Haven Hoard of 
th in placing their city among the six healthiest cities in the 
world. The change in Detroit, Mich., from one of the onhealtl 

lential cities to the very reverse, so that it ranks among the 
healthiest, was also noted. At Croydon, Eng., by the combined 
action of sanitary engineer and health board, the death rate has 
been I from 25 to 16- per thousand. Now all putrescible 

matter, instead of remaining for months and years in a condition 
■n. flows upon the land nndecomposed within two 
hours; so in a number of other plac . may be roughly < 

I that a quarter of a million people th in 

rears ending 1880, who would have died had the death- 
. as formerly in England. If r_* caaee i 
illness be th, it follows that 

mill; , have I 



92 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

saved from a sick bed by some influences at work in the past de- 
cade that had not been previously." It is not strange that intelli- 
gent people should believe in sanitary science. A volume might 
easily be filled with illustrations of this topic. A passing allusion 
is simply made here to show that the results are capable of demon- 
stration. The narrow-minded illiterate, whose thoughts as well 
as lives are cribbed and confined by a narrow range, naturally see 
little good out of their own routine. Argument and even demon- 
stration are to these of little value. 

DEATH OF DK. LEWIS WILLIAMS. 

It becomes our painful duty to announce the death of Dr. 
"Williams of Pomfret, in recounting the events of the year. He 
was a warm and earnest friend and advocate of the State Board of 
Health, and its firm supporter. Of a broad and well-cultivated mind, 
he was up to his death an active student, and kept full step with 
his brethren in everything that pertained to medical science; an 
earnest humanitarian in the best sense of the word; nothing 
that promoted the welfare of mankind was indifferent to him. 
His death is a great loss, for his well-trained mind and disciplined 
judgment made his observations and reports of inestimable value. 
His statements were carefully accurate and his opinions worthy of 
the fullest confidence. The broadness and catholicity of his mind 
were remarkable, remote as he was from that contact with others 
in the same work. But he never suffered his isolation to narrow 
his mind, and was as ready to judge a new fact on its merits as in 
earlier days. In all relations of life he won the encomiums of all 
that knew him. 

ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

Accum, Culinary Poisons. 

Adams, Sewers and Drains. 

Army Med'l Reports,, Habitual Drunkards' Act. 

Adulteration of Food Reports, 1855-6. 

Animal Inoculation, Pasteur. 

Annual Report Medical Officer, Privy Council (17th). 

Anthropology. 

Annual Report Medial Officer, Privy Council (12th). 

American Social Science Association, Trans., 1881. 

« " » " 4 Vols., per Dr. Butler. 

Allen on the Education of Girls. 
Agriculture, Board of Connecticut Report, 1880. 
American Public Health Association, Trans., Vol. VI. 



UPOBT 01 Tin: BTAT1 BOARD Of m:\i.rn. 

an od the Brain. 
Beale, Slight Ailn* 

i. American Nen 
Blake on S 

Box on Heat, A Practical Treatise. 
Bowditcfa on the Sudbury Water. 
Boulnois. Scavenging. 
Benner, First Lessons in Health. 
Baird, Food Fishes. L 878-79, per Son. J. R. Hawley. 

" " 2 vols., 1st and 3d. 
Budd on Typhoid Fever. 
Building a Home. 
Bucknill, Habitual Drunkenness. 

11 re of the Insane. 

Buchan on Plumbing. 

1 of Health, Report for 1880. 

rt. Ventilation ami Heating. 

Bulletin National Board of Health, 1881. 

Chad wick, Circulation or Stagnation. 

Caldewood, Relation of Mind and Brain. 

Caldwell, Malaria. 

Chandler, Chemistry of Water, Reports on Potable Water. 

ago Board of Health Reports. 
Characace, Parts 1-2. 

umont on Public Health. 
Cincinnati Health Department Report. 1880. 
China Medical Reports, 10th issue. 

u << u 20th .1 

" « 21st " 

• Medicine. 
_!iton, Bovine Tuberculosis. 
Contagious Disease. I ice. 

Cottage Hospitals, Burden. 
Corli inklyn on State Medicine. 

" on Sanitary Houses. 
on Healthy Houses. 
Cullimore on Consuii^. 1 
Contagious Diseases, A< 

D ' Hon. J. R. B 



94 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

De La Bee he, Sanitary Condition of Bristol, Eng., &c. 
Denton, Sewage Disposal. 

Drysdale & Haywood, Health in the Household. 
Defective Drainage of Dwelling-Houses. 
Diphtheria Restriction of Michigan. 

Edgecomb, Modern Sleeplessness. 

Edwards on Malaria. 

Ellis, Survey of the Connecticut River. 

Falligant on Dengue. 

Flint, Sanitary History of the War. 

Fleming on Tuberculosis. 

Frankel, Starch and Glucose. 

Fox, Artificial Production of Tubercle. 

Fothergill, Physiology. 

Grazzi, Relation of Improved Dwellings to Morals. 
Greenhow on Epidemic Diseases. 
Gray, Factors of an Unsound Mind. 

Hart, Truths About Vaccination. 
Harley, Anthracite and Health. 
Hecker, Epidemics of the Middle Ages. 
Health Primers, 6 vols. 
Heliyer, Sanitary Houses. 
Hood, On Warming Buildings. 

Index to Report on Contagious Diseases Acts. 
Index Medicus, 1881. 

Jillson on the Worcester Water Supply. 
Johnston, Chemistry of Common Life. 

Kirkbride on Insane Hospitals. 
Kingzett, Hygiene. 
Kestner on Trichinae. 
Klebs & Crudelli on Malaria. 

Laws of New York Relating to Public Hygiene. 

Laveran, Impaludisme. 

Lee, Handbook for Coroners. 



in tort Df Tin: 9TATE BOARD Of m:\i.TH. • '•"» 

Living on V 

I . cal I . ■. ■ ■ 

Lowin, Public And District Sewers of Denver, 

Laws Relating t" Protection oi Young Girls, Bng. 

Latrobe, Plan for Sewerage of Baltimore. 

La Roche on Malaria. 

Lonisiana Eealth Reports, I 875 and 1880. 

1 nllm-li. Malaria. 
Marsh !•'• 
Maryland Biennial Health Reports, '77-7S. *7'.'.-'mi. 
Martin's Contributions to State Bygiene, Vol. 1. 
Magin, Bacteria. 

Metropolis Hoard of Works Report. 
Monson on Separate System of Drainage. 
Mi;: S ii of Infectious Disorders. 

Murchiflon on the Continued Fevers of England. 

N ;;1 Reports. 

tl Chemistry. 
. Eaven Report of Board of Health, 1880. 
ark, Drainage of. 
S v Bedford Water Supply. 

gston, Medical Jurisprudence. 

Lham, What is Malaria ? 

Philbrick Sanitar . 
Phin "ii Trichina?. 

Pittsburgh Report Board oi Eealth. 
Providence 3 'age of. 

Page's Fungi. 
Plumber and Sanitary $81. • 

otland. 
" •• England, 
y g a of 1850, I 

itler. 

• l Ontario, I 

and of Eealth, Lunacy, and I 



96 REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

Reid, Ventilation of Dwellings. 

Review of Hygiene and Sanitary Police, 1881. 

Report on Disposal of Refuse, Saunders. 

" " The Levantine Plague. 

11 of Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane. 
Robinson, Sewage Disposal. 
Report of Connecticut Hospital for the Insane. 

" " Hartford Retreat " " " 

" " Metropolitan Board of Works. 

" " Board for the Relief of Poor and Public Health, Scot- 
land. 

Report of Commissioner of Prisons, England. 

'« " " " " Appendix. 

" Board of Health, City of Baltimore, 1880. 

" " " " " " Philadelphia, 1880. 

u a * « u u it Reading, " 

Registration Report, R. L, 1880. 

" " Providence, R. I., 1880. 

Report Water Commissioners, New London, 1880. 

" Board of Education, Bridgeport, 1880. 

" Health Department, San Francisco, 1881. 

11 Lunacy Board, Scotland. 

" Commissioners in Lunacy, England. 

" Ohio Board State Charities, 1880. 

" New York " u " 

" Malaria, Sternberg. 
Registration Reports Monthly, London, Dublin, Edinburgh, 
Paris, Ontario, Rome, Vienna. 

Report on Adulteration of Food, Congressional Committee. 

11 of Twenty Years' Experience in Physical Education at 
Amherst College. 

Roth, Dress in its Sanitary Aspects. 

Russell on Sanitary Houses. 

Rowbotham, Water Supply of London. 

Registration Report of Vermont, 1880. 

Rawlinson Sanitary Questions. 

2d Report Rhode Island State Board of Health. 

" " Illinois " " '« " 

Report of State Board of Health of Tennessee. 

" " « u " " " Alabama. 



EtEPOBT OF Till' STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. '7 

Biennial Report of loard of Eealtfa of California, 

•• •• '• -• D 

" Maryland. 

" 4i North Carolina. 

•' m '• Colorado. 
- .•-' Board of Eealth of Wia lonsin. 

11 Massachus 

•• " " •• New York. 

" " " " South Carolina 

' Michigan. 

" " u ,l •• Louisiana. 
" •• •• " " " Kentucky. 
" " " " Minnesota. 

« u ii u u h New Jersey. 

«• Board of Health City of Utica, 1880. 

»' " " •« M Somerville, 1880. 

.... ii ii ii ». Memphis, " 

' " »' " Augusta, Ga., 1880. 

11 • " " " " Concord, 1880. 

" »« " " Lowell, " 

ii ii .. ii ii ii Albany, u 

" •' " « " Bridgewater, 1880. 

" " " " " Dayton, 1880. 

rte of tlie Local Government Board, 1st and 2d. 

Sanitary Record, 1881. 
Sanitarian, VoJ. 9. 

itific American Supplement, 1881. 
Silliman, Norwich Water Supply. 

on Sources of Pure Water. 
Small Pox in London. 
Spear'.- Report on Wool-sorters' D i 
Squibb, Adulteration of Food. 
Sanitary Congress of Great Britain, kli Report 

in India. 
Softening and Purification of Wato 

lia. VoL 1. 

Shove's Pneumatic Sewers m, 

SmaU-Poi Eospil m. 

>rt 

1 



98 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Sewer Gas, Extracts from Authorities. 
Statistics of Elementary Schools in Italy. 

Tanquerel, Lead Diseases. 

Teale, Dangers to Health, a Pictorial Guide. 

Thomson on Food of Animals. 

Trichin®, Marine Hospital Report, from Hon. J. R. Hawley. 

Topographical Map of New York, from Gen. Viele. 

Tuke on Insanity. 

Turner, Hygiene of Emigrant Ships. 

Transactions American Society Engineers. 

On the Sewerage of Memphis. 

Vacher, Sanitary Condition of Birkenhead. 
Vivisection. 

Ventilation of Madison Square Theatre. 
u " Halls of Audience. Briggs. 

Watson, Hygiene. 

Wanklyn, Water Analysis. 

Winslow, Influence of Light. 

Wilson, The Ocean as a Health Resort. 

Watterly, Domestic Hygiene. 

West Ewing, Improvement Society Report. 

Woodward, Camp Diseases. 

Waring, Sewerage of Village Cities. 

" " and Drainage of Cities. 

" Storm Water in Town Sewerage. 
Working of Contagious Diseases, Acts in China, 
Waller, Report on Croton Water. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



ruin Dec. 1st. 1880, to Dec. 1. 1881, 
■y of Secretary, .... 



Cash on deposit, 
Total. 



16.87 
1,000.00 

203.13 
$3,420.00 



RECEIPTS. 



Cash. 

Balance old account, 

Total, 
Bills outstanding, about, 



c. w 



. S3. 000.00 
420.00 

. $3,420.00 
. $475.00 

CHAMBERLAIN, M.D., 

Treasurer. 



Approved, 
C A LINDSLKY. M.D., 
A ii 



DETAILED statement. 
Printing. 



For Bureau of Vital Statistics, 


$400.10 


Sanitary Department, 


7.00 






Kngineers, . 


1.50 


ay, 


3<'T 


Traveling Expenses, 


. 


Photo- Lithographic Company, 


307.00 


Postage, Express, and Telepr 


168.34 


Legal A«lvic»* and 1 


. 



100 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

Sanitary Examinations and Analyses, . . $54.63 

Stationery, Twine, and Sundries, . . . . 50.00 

Total, ...... $2,216.87 

C. W. CHAMBERLAIN, M.D., 

Treasurer. 

I have examined the accounts of the Treasurer of the State 
Board of Health for the year ending November 30, 1881, and 
have compared them with the accompanying vouchers, and find 
them correct. 

C. A. LINDSLEY, M.D., 

Auditor. 

The same remark made last year with reference to the accounts 
applies this year also; that is, that the yearly statement has to be 
made with reference to the work then finished, and consequently, 
as the fiscal year ends the last day of June, and our accounts are 
made up from December to December, they represent really parts 
of the accounts of two years. It makes little real difference, how- 
ever, as it would be difficult, even if the two coincided, to draw the 
line rigidly until a certain work was finished. Although the ex- 
penditures this year are larger, the stock on hand of blanks and 
the like for our necessary work is larger, reducing the expenses in 
that line for the ensuing year, materially. Our working balance, 
however, for the next quarter will be very small, and as usual a 
period of strict economy must intervene before any new work can 
be very actively pursued. That is one trouble- of our limited 
means; before commencing any prolonged investigations we must 
wait for a proper accumulation in the treasury. After a certain 
ground has been gone over our reports will not need to be as large, 
but just now, as in the early years of all such institutions, there are 
certain topics that must be disposed of as a sort of ground-work, 
both for enlightening the people, and also as a reference and 
foundation for more detailed and special work, in place of a great 
deal that is of general use, and, as before stated,, essential in pre- 
paring the way for the other. As soon as finances will admit we 
hope to establish a sanitary laboratory where many of the interest- 
ing questions can be investigated experimentally. The meteoro- 
logical conditions with reference to disease opens an intensely in- 
teresting field, if we were only financially able to enter upon it. 



VACCINATION; 



Prof. C. A. LINDSLEY, M.D., 

MKDIGAI DePABTMKRT, Vai.i; COLLEGE, December, 1881. 



"Nothing however beneficent can escape the criticism of the 
times in which we live. The criticism of vaccination, often 
passionate and violent, relates chiefly to points which, however 
interesting they may be, leave the main question unaffected. 
We may speculate about the possibility of the potency of vaccine 
being exhausted in the human family ; we may be surprised 
to find that people with good vaccine scars sometimes have 
Small-Pox ; we may dispute as much as we please about the 
average period when re-vacci nation may be considered a pru- 
dent safe-guard ; * * * but after all we find that we rest in 
a security against the hot rid pestilence of S ma I I- Pox unkn 
to former generations." — Dr. George Derby. 



VACCINATION. 



BY C. A. LTND8LKT. 



It is one of the recognized duties of the State Board ot Health 
[uire and diffuse among the people such information concern- 
ing tlic care and protection of their health as will be of practical 
use to them. 

The fields of study pertaining to public hygiene are wide and 
varied, and among them all there are few, if any, at the present 
time, of greater significance than vaccination. There are few, if 
any. topics, which deal with human life at all approximating to 
the importance of this, respecting which there is so much misin- 
formation and unfounded prejudice in the public mind. 

It is, therefore, an eminently proper subject, upon which the 
people should have correct information, that their unjust preju- 

- may be removed and that they may enjoy the best resu 
this beneficent boon. 

It is the purpose of the present paper to state, in brief and plain 
language, wh; - done for the human race and how 

it can be employed most safely and effectively. 

In 1708, more than eighty y< it was announced by the 

A Jenner that the inoculation of vaccinia, or cow-pox. in the 
an subject was a full and sure protection from small*] 

• disoort made by man has contributed 

human longevity. The greatness and value of this 
specific preventive of small-poi can Dover* be successfully 
ted. 
e claim of Jenner thai >tion is coin; srmi* 

nate small {>•< \ wipe OUt from the list of human illf 

loatl 
as based on the ace of millions and mil!; 

Dd think' Id. 



104 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

For the very reason fhat its protective power is so nearly infal- 
lible and its use so nearly universal, the present generation are 
comparatively exempt from small-pox, and therefore cannot and 
do not adequately appreciate the magnitude of the blessing which 
Jenner's discovery has conferred upon mankind. Vaccination 
owes its whole importance to its relations to small-pox. It con- 
fers upon the human system no new advantages, but rather is 
temporarily itself a source of some discomfort and suffering. Its 
whole value consists in its power of protecting one from that most 
fatal of human maladies, the small-pox. Its general observance 
and practice is in obedience to the law, " Of two evils one should 
choose the least." 

WHAT HAS VACCINATION DONE ? 

We can best understand the question by inquiring about the 
prevalence of small-pox in the last and previous centuries as com- 
pared with its prevalence now. 

In past times, throughout Europe and in other countries small- 
pox was universally regarded as one of the greatest scourges of 
mankind. The bills of mortality during the last half of the last 
century showed that ninety-six one-thousandths, almost one-tenth, 
of all the deaths in London occurred from this sole cause. In 
the great cities, on an average of a long series of years, it can be 
shown that one-third of all the deaths which took place in chil- 
dren less than ten years old arose from small-pox. 

"Not a decade passed in which 'the disease did not decimate the 
inhabitants in one country or another, or over great tracts of 
country; so that it came to be more dreaded than the plague." 

In Berlin, according to Caspar, from 1783 to 1799 small-pox 
caused one-twelfth of the total mortality. 

In France, 30,000 persons perished annually of this disease. 
Medical treatment availed but little to stay its ravages. A prov- 
erb of the time illustrated how resignedly the people accepted 
their fate: "From small-pox and love but few remain free." 

Among remote communities, where it had not previously pre- 
vailed, and where therefore none were exempt from its contagion 
by previous suffering, its ravages have been fearful to content*, 
plate. 

In 1518, it made complete the depopulation of St. Domingo, pre- 
viously begun by sword, fire, and famine. Mr. Prescott, in his 
"Conquest of Mexico," describes an epidemic as sweeping over 



REPORT OP THE BTATE BOARD OF UKW/ni. 

[and like c the praii lown prince and | 

. the dead ; 
a another) •• perished in h< . 

Washington Irving ria" menl 

era] epidemi g the American Indians in which "all 

bout L560, >ays De la ( k>ndamin< 

:. in the | >, upwards of 100, Odd [ndj 

we have accounts of epidemi 5 with no 

c >ver Blamschatka, Greenland, and [celand. 
[te trityin these latter-mentioned i 

to the infection being suddenly spread among peoples, none of 
who exempt bypr< btacks. In civilized count 

wher and the contagion contin- 

ually conveyed about by uninterrupted intercourse, the 
i in all communities, but finding subj< 
who bad not already bad it, and were so exenr 
ral and so contagious was tbe infection that very 
hildhood without the consequences of exposi 
• an adult person not pit-marked in the face was the excep- 
to the general rul 

iths from small-pox fall far short of a full realization 
of its evils. It wi ;al to all its victims. The BurvivoT 

were, 1 

from various seven J afflictions, which, if 

enjoyment of life and often abbrevi- 

auley eloquently comp 

in England toward the end of the 

Eigne, I : . the 

J, calling it. • 
'.: the minister- of death." *"The I 

thin living memory. 

:' its 
to a cha 

•History of Bnctuxl, 

14 



106 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

Survivors often found that although life was spared the boon 
was of questionable value, it was so much shorn, of what made 
life enjoyable. 

In many, sight or hearing, or both, were impaired or totally 
lost; and thus maimed, mutilated and disfigured, they dragged on 
a sickly, miserable existence, to become speedy victims to consump- 
tion, scrofula, or some other fatal disorder. 

Sir Gilbert Blaine stated that the report of the Hospital for the 
Indigent Blind showed that two-thirds of its beneficiaries had lost 
their sight by small-pox. 

The people of the present day have no familiarity with the hor- 
rors which small-pox may cause when uncontrolled. In our 
times, the happy immunity which we enjoy, the almost entire 
exemption of the present generation from the ravages of this 
dread destroyer of life and happiness, is wholly due to the protec- 
tive power of vaccination. 

So well is this understood, that in all communities where health 
boards exist, clothed with adequate authority and being intelli- 
gently alert, small-pox is never permitted to be propagated beyond 
the first few cases in which it may occur. ' 

Vaccination is therefore a subject of such considerable import as 
a measure of public hygiene, that it deeply concerns every com- 
munity upon which it is practiced not only that it shall be done, 
but done in the best, safest, and most efficient manner. 

There are several questions which present themselves demanding 
answers, before deciding how vaccination may be most success- 
fully employed in aid of public hygiene. 

Shall vaccination be compulsory ? 

W hat virus should be used ? 

What are the evidences of a successful vaccination ? 

How often should vaccination be repeated ? 

Who are proper subjects for primary vaccination ? 

Who are proper subjects for re-vaccination ? 

COMPULSORY VACCINATION. 

The question of compulsory vaccination is one of too much mag- 
nitude to be fairly discussed in this paper. I will therefore dismiss 
it with the statement that it is practiced in several countries in 
Europe, and partially in several States of the Union. Thus Mas- 
sachusetts and Rhode Island require all attendants upon the public 



BEPOBT OF THE BTATE BOARD OP ffEALTH. L07 

■iKit.-.i before they can be admitted. Hartford 
is th< ty in this State so far aa tin- writer knows, where 

lition of admission to the public 
[uirement is enforced apon the beneficiaries of other 
public institutions in many places. And wherever compul 
laws .wist and arc enforced they Bupply the mosl satisfactory and 
lusive evidence of the value and power of vaccination in pro- 

Dg the public health. 

T1IK QUALITY OK VACCINE VTRU8, 

vera! varieties of vaccine virus. 
1. That obtained directly from a young and healthy heifer 
winch has been inoculated with virus transmitted by the e 
process of inoculation through previous heifers in succession from 
a cow having the disease, COW-pOX, in the natural way. This kind 

'2. Vii :ned from the human subject after successful 

inoculation with any active vaccine virus. This kind is called 
huma because it has been transmitted through the 

human subject. 

The humanized and the bovine, as above defined, are the forms 
almost exclusively employed at the present time. But there have 
. and are still in occasional use other kinds of bovine virus. 
Theorists and experimenters have used virus obtained by inocu- 
lating kine with the products of human vaccination. This is called 
•id is practiced in the expectation that by pae 
in into tie of the cow it will recover any virtues it may 

I «t by frequent t:. on through the human 

More reckless theorists and experimenters have Lnoculai 

with the pus of small-pox taken from the human subject. 

:■ kind of s been obtained by inocu- 

lating k:: m a similar irniprive disease of 

ox. This 

not frequently 
ply, and as • 

ifly. 

1.' •• lymph 

:h lias been humanized, 1. i. in 



108 REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH. 

restoring any lost powers or energizing the active virus of the 
lymph. Observers very unanimously agree that the lymph so 
produced is not at all improved in quality by transmission through 
the cow. On the contrary, it is weaker in infectiveness until it 
has again become humanized by one or more passages through the 
human body. 

The scientific fact that humanized vaccine is not improved by 
retro -vaccination, being now satisfactorily determined, and the 
operation being rarely successful, it is quite probable the practice 
will fall into disuse. 

In this country it has never been much practiced except in an 
experimental way, but in Naples and other parts of Italy it has 
been more prevalent. 

The attempt to renew the stock of vaccine virus by inoculating 
cows with the lymph of small-pox from the human subject has 
been made many times. Variolation is not so often successful as 
retro -vaccination. Seaton says, " that for one case in which the 
inoculation succeeds it will fail in at least a dozen." Martin, the 
'best authority on vaccination in this country, says, "that on the 
fingers of one hand may be counted the experimenters who even 
claim success." There is, however, satisfactory evidence that it 
has occasionally proved successful; notably in England, where 
virus propagated from such original stock has been employed in 
many thousands of cases with such results as to remove all doubts 
of its protective power. On the other hand, says Dr. Martin,* 
"more than once or twice virus resulting from such experiments, 
issued widely by jubilant savans, has been employed, and the result 
has been a wide diffusion of small -pox." Hence the propriety and 
safety of variolo-vaccination is very questionable. Viius from this 
source is not at present used in this country. . 

Equination or the inoculation of kine with the horse-pox is 
another mode of developing the disease, but as it is chiefly inter- 
esting in its scientific aspects, is difficult to accomplish and not 
demanded by any need for vaccine supply, it is a matter of little 
practical concern. 

Excluding, then, retro-vaccination, variolation, and equination 
as belonging more to the domain of scientific pathology than to the 
daily duties of the medical practitioner and the interests of his 
patients, we may confine our attention to the study of the ordinary 

♦Trans. Amer. Med. Assoc. 1877. 



POM OP tin: 8X LTH BOARD OP BE \i.iii. 

form . ine virus ived by inoculation of kin«- [ 

.pox, and of the humanized viru 
ing the bovine through the human system. 

ate that all the bovine virus now used in this 
[a of the "Beaugency" stock. Od the 26th of April. 
1 866, -pos in a milch cow v. . 

us, iii France. Prom this cow another 
was inoculated, and from the second still others, usually heif- 

ssion without interruption down to the tim< 
co-Prussian war. when for most evident reasons the succes- 
of the "stock" was Lost, in Prance. Bui 

even for the world, through the philan- 
thropic enterprise and energy of that i d vaccinator, J'r. 
rtin of Boston, some of this virus was brought by 
mger to him, in September, 1870. The virus h<- 
from the 258th, 259th and 260th of the series ;' 
the B Martin and his son, who some ; i 

d him in the business, have perpetuated il uninterruptedly 

All the other producers of bovine virus in 

this country have their stock from Dr. Martin, Senior or Junior. 

ting bovine and humanized virus 
as just defined is, Which is t The true answer will he 

1 upon the com]' power of each, and the 

to influence subsequently the health o; 

which is M< ST PROTECTIVE, BOVINE ok HUMANIZED VACCINE v : : 

1.. ' popular error, which is. that no pel 

infallible safeguard against future Many well-authenti- 

i instances are on record of I lividual E 

twice and even th b the disease, and . 

last attack was DOl mall- 

., does not alwa; an infallible prol 

small-pOX. 1 liable to 

- 

Lutely in full: 

e lymph 

ble that ;• 



110 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

But small-pox in any form very rarely occurs again in a person 
who has once had it. It is the marked exception to the rule. But 
small-pox in a form called varioloid is not now very uncommon in 
persons who have been vaccinated. In most such cases vaccina- 
tion has not proved as protective as small-pox would have been. 
"Where shall we find an explanation of this defective protection ? 
Let us cast a glance back at the early history of vaccination and 
observe its results along from time to time, down the four score 
years it has been in use. 

Jenner made his first vaccinations with the lymph of the origi- 
nal disease, cow-pox, as it occurred naturally in the cow; and his 
subsequent vaccinations were made with lymph taken from the 
human subject. Having once inoculated mankind with the dis- 
ease, the product of that inoculation was used in other human 
subjects, and thus it has been transmitted by successive vaccina- 
tions of persons, through thousands and hundreds of thousands of 
human beings from the time of Jenner down to the present. Jenner 
believed that the humanized vaccine lymph lost none of its efficacy 
by transmission through the human body. That belief is still 
shared by many physicians at the present time. But from an 
early period in the practice of vaccination, there have been some 
to call in question this faith, and to doubt if humanized vaccine 
does not become gradually enfeebled by so many successive trans- 
missions without, however, altogether losing its preservative prop- 
erty. Now because, until within quite a few years, the use of 
humanized vaccine has been almost universal; and because the Na- 
tional Vaccine Institution of England has maintained, from the time 
of Jenner to the present, this mode of propagation without renew- 
ing the stock from the original source in the cow, it is possible to 
compare the results of vaccination in the earlier years with those 
of the later, in the cases in which virus of shorter and longer hu- 
manization has been exclusively employed. 

Fortunately the statistical records found in the literature of the 
subject, from the beginning of the century onward, enable us to 
arrive at very reliable conclusions about the matter. The limits 
of this paper forbid a lengthy and exhaustive analysis of the sta- 
tistics. I' can only illustrate the prominent facts which they de- 
velop by quoting a few of the most convincing statements. In 
London, during the decade 1870-9, in every million of inhabitants 
4,779 died of small-pox. Of these so large a proportion died in 
hospitals, where observations were accurately recorded, it waspos- 



REPORT OP Tin: STATE BOABD OP HEALTH. Ill 

Bible • nine that over 37 per cent occurred in 

had been vaccinal 

>ver 1,800 d< 
COrred in London, in every million of vaccinate. 1 pen 

It is just as clear that only one case in ten 

,1 small-pox was fatal; 1,800 deaths tl 

must [ of the d • every millii 

•ion. These were the facta in the 
1 let ns look hack, and contrast - of a similar 

;. in the early part ot' the century. Daring the first ten y< 
1800-0. the medical profession almost universally believed that 
nation, except in the rarest instances, prevent d smajl-pcx 
■ he remembered, too, that this faith wa 
on careful observation. Jei ry was not universally and 

unanimously received, but on the oilier hand met with violent 
opposition and the most unreasonable objections were at first 
against it. There wrremore anti-vaccinators in the first decade of 
the century than there are now. The ad of vaccination be- 

i. with Jenner, that the protection which vaccination would 
.actly that which an attack of small-pox would COB 
subsequent attack. They believed its pro - » be 

.ore nor less than that. The anti-vaccinat- ;ore 

would hav . with hilarious delight such facts as, thai 

of the deaths from small-pox were of persons who had been 

inated; that the post-vaccinal dea » in 

. million of vaccinated pen ! 000 were sick in 

is wholly inconceivable that such : 

ii or any thi i 

to them, and yet failed to be observed by the watchful Loos 

■::. h >uid 

:"ul scrutiny both by its ad . 

•ry in 1798. A c 
in 1802, to inqoj 

:ifter vaccination I 



112 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

occurrence of post-vaccinal small-pox, but declared it to be " very- 
rare " and "generally so mild as to lose some of its characteristic 
marks, and even to render its existence doubtful." In 1811 the 
National Vaccine Establishment carefully investigated and pub- 
lished an account of two cases in their report for the year. They 
mentioned one of these as the severest that had yet occurred to 
them, and also reported that it -was their belief that, "since the 
practice had been fully established, no deaths from small-pox had 
in any instance occurred after vaccination." This was in 1811, 
thirteen years after vaccination was begun; and as yet no fatal 
case known of post-vaccinal small-pox. Remember, too, that the 
exposure to its contagion was vastly greater than now, because it 
was constantly prevalent. After 1810 the practice had become 
very general in other countries and cities of Europe, and the statis- 
tics were carefully recorded. They show a like exemption from 
the contagion of smallpox after vaccination. In Copenhagen, then 
a city of over 100,000 inhabitants, where vaccination was uni- 
versally practiced, not a single death from small-pox was registered 
during the thirteen years from 1811-1825. In Annspach, in Ba- 
varia, with a population of 300,000, at that time thoroughly vac- 
cinated, no death occurred from small-pox during the nine years, 
1810-18. Between 1804 and 1813, more than two and a half mil- 
lions of people were vaccinated in France, and only seven individu 
als of those were known to have taken small-pox. 

It was not until vaccination had been practiced fifteen or twenty 
years that post-vaccinal small-pox becam e at all common or fre- 
quently fatal. Since then, however, the frequency of post-vaccinal 
small-pox has been steadily and regularly increasing everywhere 
where the long humanized vaccine virus was employed. Wher- 
ever reliable statistics have been recorded, this fact is made evident. 
In France, from 1819-35, there were recorded 5,467 cases of small- 
pox after vaccination, of which 51 were fatal. In Switzerland, 
between 1822-32, 4,211 cases occurred, with 92 deaths. In Copen- 
hagen several epidemics occurred from 1825-35, in which there 
were 3,093 post-vaccinal cases and 66 deaths. In the London 
small-pox hospital, between 1826-35, there were 915 such cases, 
and 54 deaths, as reported by Dr. Gregory. By comparing these 
fifteen years, 1819-35, with the first decade of the century, a very 
conspicuous increase of small -pox after vaccination is made evident, 
as well as an increased intensity of the disease, as shown by the 
t more frequent deaths ; the mortality being nearly 2 per cent. 



EUPOBI Of Tin: BTAT1 BOABD Of m:u/rn. Ill 

unal] fraction of l per cent, in the e 
But during the period from 1836-52, as appears bj reful- 

is ot Dr. Msrson, of the London small-pox hos] 
the mortality of po8t-yaooinal cases has increased to ♦'•.'• ) ; 

i 1852— 67, even under better hygienic conditions, the death 
. still advancing, reached 7.6 per cent in the same hospital 
And in the last decade, L870-79, there were l.j,000 cases, with a 
death rate of 9.2 per cent.* 

Whatever view of the statistics of vaccination, as practiced with 

long-humanized vims, one may take, the conclusion i^ irresistible, 

that the earlier the period in the use of vaccination, the smaller 

•he death rate, ami the later the period the larger it becomes. 

i a fraction of one per cent, previous to 1820, it has reached 

nearly 10 per cent, in 1880. 

What better demonstration is possible, that vaccination with 
long-humanized lymph has degenerated, than this showing affords ? 
The most legitimate conclusion from the foregoing history of vac- 
cination is. that long-humanized vaccine lymph gradually deterio- 
s; that virus obtained directly from the cow or heifer is far 
more protective than that which has been transmitted by repeated 
inoculations through successive human systems for eighty years ; 
that the fewer removes it is from the original source the more pro- 
tective it is. 

No one has called in question the efficacy of animal vaccination. 
There can be no reason to suppose that it is any less protective 
now than in the time of Jenner, or that humanized virus, which is 
but few removes from its source in the cow, is any less pi 
now than the humanized virus of an equal number of removes in 
Jenners day. Bnt there are other evidences of difference than the 
comparison of results as regards protective power. Let one notice 
the beginning, pro gre ss, and termination ot I ippq 

or upon opposite arms of I subject; the one 

with humani/.' ion from the COW, and the 

heifer. Tin- dif- 

fereo ment of I Lea and the. duration <>f 

induced disease, case of the man* 

• 

the eighth day. The rus is slower by 

•I am largely ii. ia rlo« Cameron, M 1> . MM'., for the abu\r statist* -. - 

"/fitly Rerietc for May, 1881. 

15 



114 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

days, the areola beginning not until the latter end of the ninth or 
early part of the tenth day,and declining at the end of the twelfth and 
often not until the thirteenth and fourteenth day. In the human- 
ized virus the whole course of the vaccine disease is often finished 
and the crust separated on the fourteenth day after the insertion 
of virus. But the crust of the bovine vaccination never loosens be- 
fore the twenty-first day, and often not until the twenty-fifth, and 
even sometimes remaining adherent until the thirty-second. Be- 
sides these visible differences in the local manifestations of the 
disease, there are others, such as altered characteristics of the 
crusts, and resultant cicatrices, all indicating that the impression 
made upon the system is correspondingly diminished; and they 
satisfactorily explain why post- vaccinal small-pox is gradually and 
steadily increasing in frequency and fatality, after vaccination 
with the long-humanized virus. 

Now what evidence exists respecting the protective power of 
bovine virus ? Animal vaccination is the original form in which 
the dairy-maids and dairy-men of Gloucestershire, England, were 
protected, and from whose experience the great Jenner evolved 
the discovery. Is it equally effective now as it was then ? is the 
important question. 

Dr. J. L. Meares, health officer of San Francisco, writes in his 
last annual report as follows: "The bovine virus (Beaugency stock) 
has been exclusively used by the health department since its intro- 
duction here five years ago. The vaccinations since that time 
reach the large number of over 80,000. This is exclusive of the 
vaccinations performed by the physicians of the city generally. 
. . . I have yet to see a case of variola or varioloid after a suc- 
cessful vaccination with bovine virus." 

Still stronger evidence on this point is that of E. Warlomont, 
M.D., Director of the State Vaccinal Institution at Brussels. He 
says that, "out of more than ten thousand vaccinated at Brussels 
with animal vaccine, from 1869 to 1870, not one case was to my 
knowledge noted as having been attacked by the epidemic which 
terrified the world in 1870 and 1871." In 1878 Dr. Warlomont, at 
a meeting of the Academie Royale de Medicine of Belgium, made 
an appeal to his colleagues in the following terms: "I have pre- 
viously said that no such case has been reported to me. I repeat 
it, and up to the present time, and not one of the numerous medi- 
cal men whom I have interrogated on the subject has contradicted 
me. Has there really not been any ? That seems to me impossi ble. 



BIP0B1 OF Tin: st ate BOAKD of health. 115 

However it may !><>. I appeal to hospital physicians and those ^<-n- 
tfemen attached to charitable institutions to clear up t 

of the deduction to be drawn from it. 

quires to he t rifled." In the present year, 1881. 

writ. has nevei yet met with any r and 

most eloquent testimony in favor of the method 
that I could possibly have This silent eloquence is of 

ter value, when the ardor is considered with which tin- adver- 
saries of animal vaccination, of whom a few rare specimens still 
. would have collected the failures; or, if we remember, 
taking the larger and more general view of the immunity procured 
by all kinds of vaccine inoculation, that Belgium has had the 
honor of being the native country of the illustrious President of 
the International League of anti-vaccinators, who no doubt would 
have been overwhelmed with the purest delight by such a 
cove 

From this testimony we may conclude that if no case of post- 
anal small-pox has been observed in the course of eleven or 
twelve years, out of more than 10,000 vaccinated with animal 
virus, the instances, if there have been any at all, must have been 
exceedingly rare. And the conclusions of the whole matter from 
all the foregoing evidence seem well established : 

1. That in point of protective power bovine virus is superior 
to humanized vir 

2. That humanized virus but few removes from its bovine ori- 
gin is but slightly, if at all, inferior in protective power to the 
bovine. But that continually transmitting* it through the human 

•in is a cause of slow, gradual, and certain d< <>n. 

The quality of the virus is a matter of such grave cone. 

Leration is not com] be superb 

of bovine over humanize . in point of protective power. 

oovine vaccine is superior also in other regards. 
For a long time a want of confidence in the enti 
g humanized lymph lias been felt. The spectre of other and 
ing communicated t<> the subject of vac 
hannl ind of anxious parents, and always proi 

stion, Is rter M good and pore r has 

been somewhat increased since the occurrence of a few insta: 
of the inoculation of syphilis has been not: though t: 

cases have been, aim Uions of peo: 

: r ed, so e but very tew in I 



116 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

have been well authenticated, yet enough have been verified to 
establish the possibility of such results from the use of human- 
ized virus. 

This danger, remarkably slight though it be, is wholly avoided 
by avoiding humanized virus and by using the bovine, because 
kine are not subject to that disease. 

Confidence in the safety of animal lymph is still further 
increased, because the results of all scientific investigation of the 
communicability of the disease of kine to man goes to disprove 
the possibility of inoculating any diathetic disease with bovine 
vaccine lymph. 

ERYSIPELAS PRODUCED BY VACCINATION. 

Up to September, 1870, when Dr. H. A. Martin, of Boston, im 
ported the first bovine virus of the celebrated Beaugency stock 
from France, the long-humanized virus (often called the Jenner- 
ian, because it had not been renewed since the time of Jenner) 
was almost universally employed. The occasional occurrence of 
erysipelas after vaccination with the Jennerian stock was an evil 
which no degree of prudence in the selection of the virus, study 
of coincident influences or of the condition of the subject, could 
altogether guard against. The liability to this disease, which was 
always a serious complication when it occurred, and which some- 
times resulted fatally, was a source of constant anxiety to the oper- 
ator and the patient and friends, and not infrequently a cause of 
unjust blame. 

It is now eleven years since the importation of the bovine stock 
into this country, and many hundreds of thousands have been 
vaccinated with it, affording an experience sufficient to base a 
judgment of its merits upon. It is said that erysipelas is particu- 
larly liable to occur in re-vaccination with humanized virus. Dr. 
Martin asserts that, with his own hand, in 1872-73, he re-vacci- 
nated about twelve thousand patients with bovine virus, and there 
was not one case of erysipelas among them all, and he had never 
known a case following the use of bovine virus at any other time. 
In 1877, he publicly announced in the Boston Medical and Surgical 
Journal for February, that bovine virus was not only exempt from 
the risk of causing erysipelas, but that it was absolutely prophylactic 
of erysipelas. It protects from erysipelas. 

In reply to an inquiry by the writer, if his more recent expe- 
rience since 1877 had given him any reason to modify his opinion 



BflPOBT Of Tin: 8TJ.TB i:o\i:i) Of in:\i/ni. 117 

in regard to this invaluable and important quality of b 

virus, he writes, in a letter dated Dec. 9, 1881, as follow 

imm m erysipelas, cither during the course or after the 

: tile vaccina induced by the use of true bovix* 
vims (t. e., virus from a young bovine inoculated from another, 
and so on back to original " spontaneous " cow-poi in the milch 
cow) is something ascertained beyond all doubt <>r <|ue>ti<>n." 

This testimony by a competent witness, after so many years of 
hful observation, and when the bovine virus has been I 
upon persons to the number of several millions, ought to be con- 
clusive. 

These facts seem to be well established, viz.: that bovine virus 
is more protective than long-humanized virus; that it is 
from the danger of communicating other diseases, and especially 
syphilis; and that erysipelas, which is the pest of humanized 
virus, does not occur at all after the use of bovine virus, but that 
it is even pr>>/>},>/l>tc f i<- of erysipelas. 

For it is scarcely conceivable that so many individuals could be 
wounded, even so slightly as by an abrasion or puncture of the 
skin, without some of them suffering from erysipelas, if the appli- 
catton of the bovine lymph was not protective against it. 

But all these superior merits of bovine virus apply only to a 
pure and genuine virus. 

The business of producing the bovine virus has been undertaken 
in this country by a host of persons, some of whom have more 
. ;ii skill or knowledge of the subject, and often with 
so sharp a scent for the pecuniary profits that their moral inte_ 

• obstacle to putting in jeopardy the public health, if their 
gains may be thereby increased. 

cultivation of bovine vaccine virus may be justly 
ered a skilled pursuit, requiring for success a liberal m< 

erience, judgment, and knowledge. Wnoever may 
possess these qualifications and will faithfully employ them 
always produi quality than one who is deficient in 

not a men- manufacturing . in which 

ends upon getting the largest returns from the smallest oi 
a commercial calling wherein , 
pass his competitors by buying and selling with ju 

the fluctuations of the market In short tin 

• 
secondary to i action oi 



118 EEPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEAXTH. 

which will most effectually protect our fellow-citizens from the 
contagion of small-pox. 

Bovine virus is supplied for use in several forms, as, — the crusts 
formed by the drying of the vesicles, the lymph stored in small 
glass tubes, and the lymph dried upon the points of quills or upon 
bits of ivory prepared for the purpose. In other countries, still 
other methods have been practised. In Italy, the entire pustule 
has been excised from the animal and preserved between bits of 
glass. When used, fragments of the flesh thus excised are inserted 
in the arm of the subject. On one occasion, thirty-eight children, 
vaccinated from such portions of cut-out pustules in a state of 
putrefaction, were seized with convulsions and phlegmonous 
inflammations, and many of them died. 

The dried crusts taken as they spontaneously separate from the 
animal contain the active lymph in a dry state, well adapted, with 
care, to preserve its active properties a long time. Much care and 
attention to the condition of these crusts, as well as to their selec- 
tion, is requisite to insure satisfactory results from their use. 

Crusts or scabs are, however, composed of varying proportions 
of lymph mixed with epidermis, debris, and perhaps pus, all of 
which is animal matter and liable to putrefactive changes, wnich 
may cause an unhealthy action in the party vaccinated ; and for 
this reason they are not recommended as the best form of preserv- 
ing the vaccine lymph. Besides, a considerable portion of the 
crusts prove to be inert, and no amount of skill yet attained by 
experts enables them to distinguish always the good crusts from 
those which are worthless. Lymph preserved in glass tubes have 
been much employed. But experience with these demonstrates 
that it is an unreliable method of preservation, the lymph being 
immediately subject to change on exposure to the air. This 
method is almost fallen into complete disuse, though at one time 
quite popular. 

The most approved method now practiced of preserving lymph 
is by collecting it from the vesicles at the period of their matu- 
rity upon thin lance-shaped pieces of ivory, upon which the lymph 
dries in a firm, thin layer. It is then wrapped carefully in cotton- 
wool, tissue-paper, and finally an outer covering of impervious 
gutta-percha, which effectually excludes air and moisture. Pre- 
pared in this manner, it has often been sent to the most distant 
countries without any deterioration of its active properties. 



EtBPOBT OP run BTATE BOARD OF BBALTH. 119 

•• ia 1 1:\ I sol. id LYMPH COM! 

aether form of vaccine virus found for Bale by instrument 
deal. The statements made in the circular pub- 

lishing the virtues of these ••patent oonee " are so much at vari- 
with the real facts respecting them, as revealed by a car 

examination of them, that it would seem to be within the lines <>f 
the legitimate and proper duty of the State Board of Health to 
openly caution the citizens of the State regarding their fraudulent 
and dangerous character. 

The said circular, which lies before me, describes them as being 
and as "solid lymph made into a thick massy 
These remarkable statements are alone sufficient to excite the sus- 
picions of any one having any practical knowledge of the busi- 
of producing lymph. The writer is informed by experts 
that an amount of "consolidated, solid lymph," enough to make 
one of these cones could not be produced for more than one hun- 
dred times the price named in the advertisement. One gentleman, 
who is among the most eminent vaccinograplrers in this country, 
and who has been a large producer of animal vaccine, writes me, 
that, if every particle of the little tears of dried lymph which 
could be obtained from two hundred heifers could be carefully 
collected, it would not be enough to make one "solid cone" of 
the size which is advertised by the New England Vaccine Com- 
pany to sell for three dollars. In the same veracious (?) circular, 
it is asserted that " these cones are entirely free from any trace of 
pus, debris, or epidermis," thus attempting to impress still more 
forcibly the previous statement that they are only "solid lymph." 
The writer submitted for examination one of these cones to I >r. 
T. Mitchell Prudden, Director of the Physiological and Pathologi- 
cal Laboratory of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New 
k, and Lecturer on Normal Histology in the Medical Depart- 

Le College. The following is a copy of In 
rt of his examination: 

"New York. July 1. 1881. 
•• Dkab I encloei ©rt of th< 

of virus, and send you a slide for examination with 
glass of low povv 

portion which I e 

»urs, T. IfrrcHKLL Pbi ddi 

Ds. Ciia.v \. Ldtosli 



120 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 




Q rv^ 



MICROSCOPICAL DRAWING FROM A SOLID LYMPH CONE, AS DESCRIBED. 
a HAIRS, b PART OF A LEAF, c VEGETABLE FIBRES, d AMORPHOUS MATTERS. 



REPORT OP Tin: STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 1-1 

Tin: BKPOBT. 

•■'i 3 largely >r and Bmall< 

'1 detritus, I gether wit b ;i large numb 
roken of! and others torn onl ; 

kirui >f connec 

rable colored amorphooa mat 
9e nature 1 am unable to determine. A few Lymph cellfl and 
fragments of the aame are also present. 

• Quantitative iv>ult< were net Boughl for; but from about half 
single cone I picked out se - of hair 

which were readily visible to the naked eye, and many more \. 
which w< ''ii by low powers of the microscope." 

itched mixture that the patentee offers to the 
"8 id lymph." It seems to be constructed on the - 
utke mortar, to be held together with hair. 
Any physician with an appreciable sense of the dangers of sep- 
tic i>oisoning would never venture to inoculate a patient with such 
and of animal and vegetable matter, liable at any moment, 
unde ble conditions, to take on putrefactive changes, which 

it fatally poisoner. 

gs of the Medical Society of the County of 
Kings, N". V d account of a death after oe 

one of the coi ined from the New England Vaccine Com- 

pany, occurring to an officer in the U. S. Navy, a;cl reported l>y 
on. 

ip's medical journal: 

Whit taker, Chief ir. Left arm wry much 

inflai n." 

•• Mar •: :; i. Whitta i fever; 

ul; inflammal 
Whitta 

•ion of 
inflamma enfer- 

with 

: 7th. A 

Whitta'.' 

No im- 

l«i 



122 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

provement in the condition of the arm. He is under the care 
of Dr. S., of Brooklyn." 

" March 10th. Whitfcaker, Chief Engineer. Erysipelas. Infor- 
mation was received this morning that Mr. Whittaker grew worse 
the early part of the evening, and died about 10 o'clock, p. m." 

The above record leaves little doubt that the virus used in the 
vaccination was the cause of the erysipelas and death. 

The surgeon making the report writes that "this is the only 
case of erysipelas or disease of any kind which he has observed 
from vaccination, . . . but the Powhatan lying near us had one 
fatal case some weeks ago." 

All the bad results of impure vaccination do not get into print. 
But it needs but very few such sad events as the above to main- 
tain and intensify the popular prejudice against all vaccination, 
however prudently and scientifically done. 

It is a very serious misfortune, that so good, so safe, and so 
essential a means of public safety should be questioned and 
doubted and its usefulness limited because it must share in the 
public mind all the odium and reproach which justly should attach 
only to the imperfect, deceptive, spurious, and injurious kinds of 
vaccination. Yet such will continue to be the fact so long as it is 
popularly believed that old women, druggists, midwives, clergy- 
men, schoolmasters, etc., are competent to properly perform the 
operation and pronounce upon its results. Such will continue to 
be the fact, so long as the intense commercial competition in the 
production of cheap virus attracts venal-minded and mercenary 
men of every grade of capacity who may think it presents a 
chance for money-making. Such will continue to be the fact, too, 
so long as physicians culpably neglect to fully inform themselves 
as to the source and quality of the virus which they use upon 
their patients, and trust to druggists, instrument-makers, and 
traders of every sort, who, through their facilities for advertising, 
can offer them virus at the cheapest rates. 

The evils resulting from vaccination are, in the present light of 
science, almost wholly avoidable. ^With scarcely an exception, 
every unfortunate result from vaccination may be justly attribu- 
table to ignorance or inexpertness on the part of the vaccinator or 
a culpable carelessness in the selection of the virus. 

Besides the dangers which may follow the use of poisonous 
virus, there is a far greater mortality resulting to persons who 
contract small-pox, while living in supposed security, on account 



REPORT OF Tin: BTATE BO \i:i> OP HEALTH. 

of theirs ms having been spurious and in ' "What 

i< called vaccination," Bays Dr. num* 

i rnited S • in name, and no 

son has said concerning vaccination in 
land, so in the United ••Ali persons, amateurs, drugg 

women, mid wives, etc., are I to vaccinate In any way 

they may tliink proper, and the persons operated on are considered 

. w been • I." 

It will | i Long time before public intelligence will 

igh a standard as to tolerate the interference of the 

state tthorities with the rights of private citizens 

in any manner, and by any one, or with anytl 
that said citizens may select, and to pay for it and take what 

may ensue. But as the eminenl E sanitarian 

Mr. S "No principle can be more obvious than 

that h? the to vaccinate the people, above all, if it 

compels • ile to be vaccinated, it must take every poss 

security for t'. ace of tin' vaccination which it off< 

The subject is one of such momentous importance to the public 
it is worthy of profound attention. The wide-spread 
this time o£ small-pox in every direction throng' 
whole country will asion for a vast deal of vac 

and re ting. 

Is it p restrict the use of the vaccim . with 

■h the market is flooded by irresp i 
viding on the part of the state, to all qualified practiti 
>f a quality reliab 

would insure such quality, 
• low a rate as t<> 

so carefully 
to the fullest confid 

W. M. V Municipal Small- 1 

- SS follows, on t: 
■ 

1 which : 

oiraal lymph ..f p dity 

is of so e; left 

of UIkIduI)!' Ill* 1 



124 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

WHAT ARE THE EVIDENCES OF A SUCCESSFUL VACCINATION? 

As has already been observed, large numbers' of persons are 
vaccinated only in name and not in reality. It is therefore a mat- 
ter of much importance to know confidently and reliably in which 
list a person rightfully belongs, that he may govern himself ac- 
cordingly. 

In the early days of vaccination the test was, subsequent inocu- 
lation with the small-pox. In Jenner's time the protective efficacy 
of vaccination was very frequently tested in that way. Within 
two or three years after Jenner announced his discovery, he re- 
ported that upwards of six thousand persons had been inoculated 
with the virus of cow-pox conveyed through a succession of human 
subjects, and the far greater part of them have since been inocu- 
lated with that of small-pox, and exposed to its infection in every 
rational way that could be devised, without effect." 

Such a test proved beyond question the protective power of 
vaccination. That fact is no longer in dispute. No fact in medi- 
cal science is more firmly established. It is in these days, there- 
fore, only needful to know that one has been the subject of a 
genuine vaccination to know that he is thereby protected. 

Vaccination produces a specific disease; vaccinia, with diagnostic 
indications so well marked that an expert does not mistake them. 
The beginning, progress and termination of the inflammation ex- 
cited by the inoculation of a person with the virus of cow-pox is 
so characteristic, when it is undisturbed in its natural course, that 
it is unlike any other, and can be recognized and identified as a 
vaccination by an intelligent person of good powers of observa- 
tion, who has had frequent opportunities of seeing true vaccina- 
tions. But without such opportunities, or without the ability to 
improve them, the diagnosis cannot be made. Such an one has 
no hesitation in pronouncing every sore arm, following his punc- 
tures or his scratches, a successful vaccination, whatever condition 
it may present, whether spurious or genuine. Not infrequently 
the sore upon the arm arising from the insertion of worthless virus 
is even more severe than that resulting from the genuine lymph. 
Hence the dangerous error of entrusting an operation, the success 
of which one's life may afterwards depend upon, to an unskilled 
and incompetent person, who cannot distinguish between a com- 
mon or an erysipelatous inflammation and the specific indications of 
vaccinia which result from the inoculation of vaccine virus, and 
which only afford safety from small-pox. 



REPORT OF Tin: BTATE BOIRD OF HEALTH. L25 

!■ w< old » rv< do good purpose, and is qo( within the intei 
[be at length and minutely the 
T idod 

the reader th< ghty 

the influence of which Lfl of Bnch © I 

portion and perhaps the whol< life will i d by 

it. The simplicity of the operation, and the inconsiderable U 

h usual;;. inld not blind any one to the 

that it is an event of deep concern to every individual, [t 

trivial thing which many regard it. 
gently performed and with uncertain effect 

now OFTEN SHOl LD vaccination BI BEFEATEO? 

i>ject of r* ation is one upon which much differ* 

of opinion exists in regard to some minor s. But upon 

the importance of it. and the use of it, as a general rule of | 
unanimity of opinion. 
Why is re-vaccination necessary? 

There are ; 9 for it; one is, because the prim 

::iation v. ive. 

iner recognized this necessity, and he was accustomed to 
what too much neglected now. to watch 

inations throughout their entire course, and if any irregularity 
occurred, to advise re-vaccination immediately, or at some early 
convenient period; because he had already learned that 

inations were not fully pro :id could not be depended 

In these hr 
lymph so frequently vitia* 

vaccination i- tore con.: his- 

■ 

It is the more unfortuna the prim 

if it has tab 

And BO a child who ha.- had 01 
spur. ally, if at all. pi 

hich 
a good prima! ded. 

:it reason w 



126 REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

make good the defects of a primary vaccination, although it is the 
best means of remedying the evil which can . be employed. 
Another defect of primary vaccination is due to the application of 
too minute a quantity of vaccine lymph, the operation being per- 
fect in other regards. 

Dr. Marson, who was for many years physician to the London 
Small-Pox Hospital, shows, by an "analysis of his cases, that the 
mortality in post-vaccinal small-pox bears a very distinct relation 
to the quality and amount of the vaccination as evidenced by the 
number and character of the vaccine scars. His analysis showed 
that, of patients wiih one cicatrix over 9 per cent, died, of those 
with two marks 6 per cent, died, with three about 3^ per cent., 
and of those with four and more only about 1 per cent. It showed, 
also, that in cases with good cicatrices less than half the number 
died than died among patients with indifferent marks." 

This evil is largely obviated by the recent method of vaccina- 
ting, which is by abrading a portion of the skin and applying the 
virus to the raw surface. This pretty uniformly secures the appli- 
cation of the lymph over as large an absorbing surface as would 
more than equal the two, three, or four punctures that used to be 
made in inserting the virus. So that a vaccination by the modern 
method is generally equivalent to three or four punctures by the 
old method. The other reason why re-vaccination is necessary is 
that experience has determined, beyond a doubt or question, that, 
in addition to those who are only partially protected by reason of 
irregular or spurious primary vaccination, there is another class of 
no inconsiderable numbers, who, notwithstanding perfect primary 
vaccinations, have gradually acquired a renewed susceptibility to 
the contagion of small-pox in greater or less degree. It is not 
possible to distinguish this class from those who still enjoy the full 
protection afforded by vaccination. If such discrimination could 
be made with assurance it would be necessary to re-vaccinate only 
such as needed it. But the impossibility of knowing which, in a 
vaccinated community of adults, are liable to the infection of 
small-pox and which are not, involves the necessity of giving the 
means of protection to all. 

Re-vaccination, therefore, is a wise proceeding, on the part of 
grown-up people, as affording probable needed security to such as 
have had defective infantine vaccinations, and as affording an 
additional security even to the best vaccinated, as no individual 
can tell whether he may be one of the great majority who are 



\Ti: BOARD OF HEALTH. L27 

fully prol mall minority all y 

\ ith ill-defined ch 
more than th< 
with only need it more than those with thre< 

. i 

. : [i >\ SHOl LD BI DON] . 

the primary vaccination in infancy to have been 
unez 1, the teachings of experience are, that the subj< 

until the period when the growth of the body ia about being 
lcg of pnberty. During this transition 
between youth and adult life, the changes in the system 

aded in a small minority of persons with a partial loss <>f the 
protective p" I that La a period beyond which 

rson possibly incurs some degree of risk if m 
The in. of re-vaccination at t] more urgent in 

• indications of a good primary vaccinal 
A good and sufficient primary vaccination is, as a I 
then full ive inn 11 the age of twelve or fifteen years. 

cs under which an earlier repetition would be 
a known exposure to the infection of variola or the 
prevalence of 8 lie of the disease. • 

As to subsequent re-vaccinations, the weight of evidence is, that 
an adull nation with true bovine virus with positive vac- 

1 effect will be fully pro -t small-pox for 

■r of life: or, t will b 

insusceptible of small-; if he or she had twice bad thai 

it is certain cannot truthful I; 
iih the long-hum; 

: by the frequent 

-' of varioloid and even variola after adult re-vao-ina- 
tion with it. 

of opinion p 

I (and 
until within ten 

D in 
infai 



128 REPORT OF THE STATE BORRD OP HEALTH. 

THE AGE AT WHICH PRIMARY VACCINATION SHOULD BE PERFORMED. 

This is a matter of much practical interest. 

If an infant has been exposed or is liable to be exposed to the 
infection of small-pox it should be vaccinated at once, however 
young. There is the less objection to vaccinating infants of very- 
tender age with the bovine virus, because there is no danger of 
erysipelas, which is the great dread when humanized virus is 
employed. But if there is no known risk of exposure the opera- 
tion may safely be delayed until the age of three or four months, 
but not longer, because soon after this the period of active denti- 
tion begins, with its attendant irritations and frequent derange- 
ments. During this period vaccination should not be attempted 
except for necessity, because it might not take, or it might be ren- 
dered imperfect by the other disorders of the system, and thus 
impose upon the child the misfortune of an imperfect primary 
vaccination. So that if not vaccinated before the time of teething, 
it is desirable to postpone it until after that process is mostly over. 
This waiting prolongs, by several weeks or months, the period of 
exposure, during which the child must be more closely guarded, 
and cannot without some risk be taken even upon the street, or 
make journeys, or be carried in any public places. 

The importance of an early vaccination is the more impressive 
when we remember that young children have always been the 
most numerous victims of small-pox. The statistics of England 
show that one-fourth of all the fatal cases are of children under 
one year of age. 

CHILDREN SHOULD BE IN HEALTH WHEN VACCINATED. 

This rule does not necessarily exclude many children who are 
sickly and feeble. Scrofula does not prevent the full development 
of vaccinia, nor would, the latter stages of chronic whooping- 
cough forbid the operation, and so of some other chronic disor- 
ders; but acute febrile diseases do always. Except under pressing 
necessity, skin affections, particularly those of a vesicular form, as 
herpes, eczema, and intertrigo, should occasion the postponement 
of the operation until they are cured. 



VACCINATION. L29 

\ .:■ -.-fill vaccinator will always examine if there be any um-rup- 
lisorder upon his patient, such as often is found behind the 
ears, any chafing in the folds of the neck or in the groins, h 
he operates. 

TL' I observing powers of Jenner early detected the in- 

terfering influence of cutaneous diseases, and he described how 
they prevented the full and correct reception of the vaccine influ- 
ence. His rule of practice was " to sweep away all eruptions from 
the skin previous to inserting the vaccine lymph." 

The period of weaning is an unsuitable time for this operation, 
for obvious reasons. It should not be performed, except under t In- 
most pressing need, during epidemics of any of the severe diseases 
of children. Also, except for urgent cause, during the seasons of 
extremes of temperature it had better be postponed. 

CONCLUSIONS. 

1. That the vaccinia produced by the proper inoculation of vac- 
cine virus protects the subject as much as an attack of small-pox. 

2. That wherever compulsory laws are enforced, the protection 
afforded by vaccination is satisfactorily demonstrated. 

3. That as between the two kinds of vaccine virus now in 
viz., the bovine and the humanized, the bovine is to be preferred. 
(o.) Because it is fully protective, while the humanized gradually 
loses its protective power by frequent transmissions through the 
human system, (b.) Because bovine is exempt from the risk of 
communicating other diseases than vaccinia, while the humanized 
virus is liable to produce erysipelas, and in rare instances has con- 
ed the pois<m of syphilis. 

J. That the vast importance of this subject, as it concerns the 
public welfare, forces the inquiry : If the best interest mu- 

nities do not demand that a supply of genuine, trustworthy, bovine 
virus should he always provided by skilled producers, under the 
official direction of the state or national governmei 

5. That a primary infantile vaccination with good . ;rus 

Ml fully protective until the age of puberty, and that I n 

at or about that time, resulting in any per vaccinal 

effect, will be protective through the remainder of life. 

IT 



Malaria in Connecticut. 



C. W. CHAMBERLAIN, M.D., 

; ap.y op the Connecticut Medical Societt, Member of the Ai>\ 
Committee op the American Fui:i 10 Hkai.ih AB800IATIOV, SSOBI 
op tue Connecticut State Board op Health. 



MALARIA IN CONNECTICUT. 



The problem of the causation of malaria,* notwithstanding the 
amount of time and thought that has been expended upon it, is not 
yet fully solved. In fact, one can hardly say that we know much 
more concerning the primal cause than is known concerning all 
fever poisons, that is. that they are particulate, minute particles of 
matter and insoluble, and probably either of vegetable or animal 
nature, but which is not so clear. The address of the president 
of the section on practical medicinef at the International M.-di- 
cal Congress of 1881, in touching upon this point, stated : 

u Perhaps no more important step has been made in practical pathol- 
ogy than the proof that some, at least, of the contagia are organized 
solids. This discovery, which has tried the patience, experimental skill, 
and scientific criticism of the best observers to establish, has brought us 
at length within view of that which has been hitherto so mysterious. 
To have been able, though imperfectly, to separate the contagious par- 
ticles, to have come to the conclusion that no fever poisons are soluble, 
is a hopeful preliminary towards forcing them to yield up the secret of 
their natup 

There had been a pretty general agreement on the particulate 
nature of the virus of yellow fever, growing out of the close study 
of that disease since the recent epidemics in this country, and the 
precise nature of the germ that produces splenic fever, the bacillus 
anthracis, has been demonstrated. The paper on vaccination in rela- 
tion to chicken cholera and splenic fever, by Pasteur, read a* 
same Co i. confirmatory of these views. The experin; 

of Lanzi and Terrigi. 1870 to "7 r >. tended to prove that malarial 
fevers were produced by algffl spores, not of any one species, but 
of- any sufficiently small to pass through the capillary 

asserted the idea that malaria was due to sp 
or gn